Newton’s Purrspective – Cats and Sleep

Sir Isaac Newton is our Feline Editor At Large (just how large, he’s not saying) who writes very brainy and very well researched articles for us. Newton lives in the North East and is fond of storms, our catnip toys, a soft bed, sunbeams, and naps. He has an ongoing email flirtation with our Daphne. This is his current, and as always, very well done article.


Cats have a reputation for preferring sleep over almost anything else. Perhaps you’ve seen the cartoon showing a group of “business cats” sitting around a table. The head cat is calling for a vote. Should they explore, invent things, do research etc. or keep napping? All answer “nap”. You may laugh, but I don’t think that is such a bad idea considering the decisions far too many humans make without taking adequate time to think about it, consider the consequences, or gather information and read about, or “sleep on it”.




Isaac Newton

Cats need approximately 12-16 hours of sleep daily. I really don’t understand why we should get a bad rap for that. Dogs need 12-14 hours of sleep and nobody jokes about them! But seriously, if you’re going to take an afternoon nap wouldn’t it be better for a snooze with a cat? Of course, we felines enjoy helping you read, type on the computer, text on your phone, knit – almost any activity. But naps are our specialty and you could learn a lot from us! Lying down is an invitation for a snuggle. We are soft and super flexible for cuddling – especially in cold weather. We also make the most delightful music while “making biscuits” on your stomach. Irresistible!

In fact, we cats have perfected the art of napping. We can fall asleep quickly and awake refreshed in a flash! Surprisingly, some people (who may have been cats in another life) have even learned the joys and benefits and they call it, appropriately, a “cat nap”.

Even if you aren’t feeling tired you probably enjoy watching Kitty sleep. What could be more relaxing, meditative even? You may wonder if cats dream. Of course we do! Sometimes our legs kick or our toes twitch like we are running in hot pursuit of a toy or something to eat. We can look like we are chewing, dreaming of a delicious morsel. What are we dreaming of? Perhaps we are dreaming of what we love, like chasing butterflies, hunting for a snack, or a platter of fresh meat. Or maybe we are indulging a more sinister side – catching and crunching unwary birdies.

Regardless, we are never as uncouth as dogs. Have you seen them dreaming? Barks and whines and enough leg movement to generate electricity! Cats are refined and elegant even in our dreams.

Can a cat sleep too much? I think a more important question would be “Have Kitty’s sleeping habits changed?” Kittens and senior cats do tend to sleep for longer periods. But lethargy in a normally active cat is a concern. Other considerations include poor diet or a health problem such as changes in Kidney function. A veterinarian should definitely be consulted if there are symptoms of disease (vomiting, changes in water consumption, flinching with pain when touched or picked up, etc.). Keep in mind that we cats are experts at hiding sickness as to not appear to be weak and vulnerable. Extra sleep could be a “self healing” technique handed down via DNA from our wild ancestors. If Kitty is sleeping much more than usual a health check is in order. If the veterinarian gives Kitty a clean bill of health it may mean that Fluffy may be bored and in need of environmental enrichment – perhaps a CATio, extra attention from you, or fresh Cat Faeries toys.

Now some people complain that cats race around in the middle of the night for “no reason at all”. Of course there is a reason! Wild cats are normally crepuscular. They are most active at dawn and dusk when prey is most available. Housecats don’t have to catch their own meals, but we retain some of that genetically programmed timetable. We have just modified the timetable a bit to suit ourselves. Why not? We (in the sense of the “royal we”) were once worshipped in Egypt and have never forgotten that.

Who doesn’t like to have fun and get a little exercise? How fun it is to scuff up the area rugs and knock things off tables! Considering that our night time vision is six times better than that of humans why shouldn’t we take advantage of the extra room to run when the rest of the household is asleep? We have all day to nap.

Sir Isaac Newton, Feline Boy Genius and Cat Faeries Editor At Large
 
 
 
 

Reader’s tips on how to lure a feral cat into your heart and into your home!

 

From Rosalinda: “This little stray showed up in our backyard, we feed it but once it eats it runs and hides.”


When we posted this story and photo from Rosalinda of her little backyard stray kitten she told us that the kitten runs and hides after feeding time. We have some pretty smart and experienced with feral cats readers on our Facebook page, and if you’ve got a feral cat or kitten who you’d love to bring into your home here are some of their tips!


Deborah V tells us: I had a little cat that I was feeding and she was very shy (and careful, I must say). But, after about 6 months, she started to come up to me and let me touch her. Then after a while, I got her to come inside. She stayed with me inside (never going outside again).

Patricia C. has stellar advice: If you lay down she may not be as frightened. Also sing a soft little song. Some cats love music.

Donna I. reminds us of this great trip, which works wonders! Give the kitty the trust blink. you look it in the face and slowly close your eyes and open them, if you wear glasses take them off so it can see your eyes. blink slowly and wait to see if they blink back. if you do this for a few days it’s ok, if they blink back then they trust you. maybe you can put the food in the bowl and sit there on the steps, not in the chair. he/she will learn your scent, maybe even rub up against you. just be patient

Diane McG suggests: Beautiful kitty. Please try to rescue it because it’s very dangerous outside. You could probably borrow a live trap from the Humane Society.

Wendy R says: Just keep feeding her. I’m sure eventually she’ll venture inside and stay. Just show kitty love.

Colleen D has encouraging words: She will come around!

Robin P. has words of wisdom: Doesn’t trust yet…please be patient..God Bless you!

Norma Jean TS wants you to know: Soon it will be friendly

Cathy MS wants you to know: I’ve been feeding a stray cat for a year on my front porch. Iv only recently been able to scratch her back a little.

Andrea Lee B: tells us: It is wonderful you are feeding the baby but please… when you do catch… get her/him neutered.

Millie C has a good tip: Every time you put food out keep bringing it closer and closer to your home and the kitten has to claim you. Thank u so much you have a great heart

Elizabeth W has this to say: Be patient. Little by little she’ll feel safer. Just keep it up. Don’t make fast moves or loud noises around her.

Phyllis L speaks from experience: Try to get a have a heart trap and catch it to get it spayed or neutered. Alley Cat organization will help with that. Took me over a year to get the last of 4 ferals to come in my house. That was 10 yrs ago!

Patricia K has good advice: Move the bowls further away from the chair. You are BIG… sit down, but not too close. Sweet talk very softly while the kit is eating. You will have her in your lap in about a week, maybe two.

Sina T is encouraging: I am hoping that she will come around for you.

Connie H tips her hat to Rosalinda: Love that you are feeding. Just be very patient.

Linda M has good things to say: It looks like a young cat, if your willing to take care of this beauty be gentle and keep feeding on a regular basis it takes time for them to trust and they choose.

Pamela M. is cheering you on: The girl says just keep at it and be patient she’ll come around. Has to learn to trust first and foremost

Joan F. is optimistic: Be patient, trust will come…this little cutie needs your love & help!!!


When you feed your feral cat, or cats, sit with them. Being closer to their level makes you less scary, more friendly. Cats and other animals communicate telepathically – they see images of what we are thinking (like when you are looking for the cat carrier for a vet appointment, they “see” the image of the carrier in your mind and run!) What you want to do is free your mind of the usual chatter, worries, and thoughts and images of chores we are bombarded with. This technique is good for you and the cat as it’s a nice time to meditate. Imagine your thoughts on the 12th floor of a building, in an elevator, which is holding all the chatter and thoughts in your mind. Now, bring the elevator down to the 11th floor with less chatter and thoughts. Then to the 10th floor with even less chatter and thoughts. Keep going. The goal is to reach the ground floor in a paradise where you’ll be free of chatter and thoughts and be in a state of quietude which is going to feel very safe to the feral cat and be healthful for you too. If the cat wants to approach you let it happen BUT do not reach out. Play hard to get! Make the cat want your attention! You might see the cat lay down, sit down, or clean a paw or face. This is what we want. Keep practicing. Eventually the cat will trust you and you can try to stroke the cat (start with the aura, then then fur once the cat is ok with your reach) and at that time you can decide what’s next for you and the cat!

While you are descending down the Meditation Elevator you might picture your thoughts and chatter being swept away by a broom, perhaps blown away be a breeze, or encased in a cloud or a rose bud where the breeze with take it away, or place those thoughts in a sail boat and allow them to sail away.
 
 
 

How to safely travel in a car with your cat – crash test dummy videos will reveal the dangers

This is an Encore Article from our blog and newsletter! How to safely transport your cat in the car. New videos!

We posted this warning and a video 5 years ago. Recently we found more videos of crash tests with stuffed animals in various harnesses and carriers.

It’s Summer and we are in cars and going places more than usual. And sometimes we are transporting our cats. Think that buckling your cat’s carrier handle with your seat belt is safe? We did until we researched it many years ago. The best place for your cat’s carrier is on the floor of the back seat, behind the passenger side with just enough space between the front seat and the back seat so that the carrier is snuggly tucked in place. If there’s a collision the carrier won’t go flying.

Here are videos of crash test dummies – very very scary and everything you thought you knew about safety for cats and dogs in cars will literally fly out the window!

How plastic and cloth carriers and harnesses do in crash tests from Subaru America and The Center for Pet Safety

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pIHrDdu_bVE

You can see the individual test videos for the carriers, crates, and harnesses from the above tests here.

Most dog harnesses fail miserably in these crash tests from Australia – worth watching even you have cats.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CxR4HltkwUA

This video is in German but you don’t need to understand it to see what happens in crash tests, the visuals say it all.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iptBky_g3H4
 
 
 
 

Cat Parents are getting smarter every day with Cat Faeries help!

We have some exciting solutions to climate change to tell you about. Farm lands with grazing animals is being lauded as THE SOLUTION. And even backyard gardeners, like us, can do it too with compost!

Here you can learn about “regenerative farming” or “regenerative ranching” and even “regenerative gardening in small spaces” which could very well halt and reverse climate catastrophe this short and eloquent TED Talk given by a 4th generation farmer who is also a friend and colleague of the ranch we get our own meat which will motivate you and make you feel hopeful. You’ll become another consumer who demands only foods grown or raised in a regenerative manner.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=suHCiRlT-oc

Something anyone with a garden, farm, or even has a nearby empty lot can do! Dump compost on it! It draws down C02 from the atmosphere and creates carbon rich soil which plants love! We share this video because it gives us hope. Each and every one of us can be WE that will save this planet while THEY don’t care and won’t step up. Share this one far and wide! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z91QsZA1l_w

From a blogger Acadia Tucker: “I want to make regenerative gardening easy because cultivating even a little bit of carbon-rich soil can make a big difference. Eric Toensmeier estimates that his own tiny carbon-rich backyard garden, about a tenth of an acre, can offset the carbon emissions of one American adult per year. For me, that says one thing: let’s grow some good food. It’s time.” https://www.greenamerica.org/blog/author-and-farmer-acadia-tucker-answers-questions-about-climate-victory-gardening

Fix the climate, prevent cat food shortages, and take back the one only planet which has cats on it and be a hero that future generations will thank!
 
 
 

Newton’s Purrspective: Climate Change and the Half Full Cat Food Bowl

Sir Isaac Newton is our Feline Editor At Large (just how large, he’s not saying) who writes very brainy and very well researched articles for us. Newton lives in the North East and is fond of storms, our catnip toys, a soft bed, sunbeams, and naps. He has an ongoing email flirtation with our Daphne. This is his current, and as always, very well done article.


Fellow cats! With all the crazy things going on in the world today I have to admit it is very tempting to curl up in my Cat Faerie bed and ignore it all. But it is time for everyone to step up and act responsibly for the good of our health and that of our planet. Remember – “There is no Planet B” as seen on a T-shirt! Another t-shirt points out – “Save The Earth, It’s the Only Planet With Cats!”

I know I got your attention when I recently talked about the dangers to our beloved sacred wild herb from screwy weather conditions, our beloved Catnip could be in peril. But I am sorry to be the bearer of more bad news. The situation is much worse than even I imagined. Climate change is also threatening our food supply! Yep, that’s CAT FOOD!

If you did not rise up and speak to your maids and butlers (perhaps by doing a little discrete nail sharpening on their shins) it is not too late to start your campaign. Climate change is here. And as they said in the 1960’s: “If you are not part of the solution, you are part of the problem.”




Isaac Newton

The central part of the US has experienced extreme weather conditions this past year. Of course, the most obvious adverse effect of too much rain is flooding. Property, lives and infrastructure have all been impacted. Our hearts go out to all the people and animals who lost homes, or more. The huge amount of flooding also affects agriculture, though the precise mechanism may not be so obvious. The good news is that the recent flooding did not happen during the growing season, so crops may still be planted and harvested on the normal schedule. The bad news is that any crop stored in barns or silos is at risk for water damage. Dampness can lead to mold, of course, rendering the crops unsuitable for food. Also, flood waters also carry dangerous contaminants such as pathogenic organisms, pesticides and other toxic substances.

Toxins could also remain in the soil after floodwaters abate. And as you know, everything is connected to everything else. The FDA has already issued warnings to farmers. https://www.fda.gov/animal-veterinary/cvm-updates/resources-animal-food-producers-flooded-central-southern-plains-us

Although this is a proactive gesture it reminds me that not all quality regulations are equal. Standards for human consumption are generally higher than those for nonhumans. In fact, the FDA report alludes to the fact that contaminated feed may be somehow permissible for domestic animals. I, of course, am outraged! Why should we dear animals eat food considered unfit for humans?

I’ve been talking about the effects of floods on crops. Are cats affected by the quality of silage? They certainly could be. We just don’t know all the potential pathways for toxins to move into our food.

As obligate carnivores we cats cannot be complacent about the quality of our food. Cat food can, and does, contain a variety of fruits and vegetables. You unknowing felines could be eating lettuce, blackberries and… yuck: artichokes! I kid you not. http://vetnutrition.tufts.edu/2017/07/research-update-new-insight-into-grain-free-cat-diets/ There is nothing wrong with a little vegetable or herb matter in the high-end cat food that was studied and I don’t even want to think what might be in bargain brands.

I will be 12 years old in August and I’ve lost my kittenish naïveté (though not the desire to play with bottle tops). I have definitely become more cynical about our government. The “Green New Deal” has lots of ideas to improve life for all in America. But, as with anything that originates in DC it will cost a lot money, and just as bad, it will take a long time, time which we don’t have. We cannot rely on THEM to fix the messes we are in, but must step up and WE must fix impending disasters that have already begun to befall this planet!

Frustrated individuals and communities are taking things into their own hands. Strategies range from youth educating older generations, to planning boards changing local building codes to towns filing suits against companies that threaten community resources. We have to demonstrate what we really want and need because those lazy-bones, bribe taking politicians rarely do the job they were elected to and paid to do.

As always, I urge you to make sure your servants get the facts and then get out and vote. In fact, don’t wait for November. Call or write NOW! I know most of us are frustrated, but we must not let apathy rule us. If I had opposable thumbs I would be calling my government representatives. Because your cat depends on YOU here are a few phrases, articles and videos that you should become familiar with we cats and our beloved people can live long and prosper.

Your friend,
Sir Isaac Newton, Feline Boy Genius and Cat Faeries Editor At Large

 
 
 
 

When cats are naughty or loud at night and what it can mean!

When cats fight at night or pee outside of the litter box at night this tells Auntie Cat Faerie that most likely you’ve got feral cats coming around!

The neighborhood ferals, also called Community Cats, are active at night when it’s safer for them to prowl and hunt outside. Since it’s the middle of the night when we are sleep, we have no idea they are there and we might even tell people “we don’t have ferals in our neighborhood.” Surprise!

Your inside cats hear them, see them, and if they are spraying urine or peeing outside your house, your kitties smell them. All of which upsets your cats. Many cats don’t care about the presence of outside cats but for the indoor cats who do care it will cause them to fight – or worse – pee in retaliation! Still not convinced that some of the behaviors your cat is exhibiting is caused by ferals, answer this: 1) do you find that your cat peed or pooped by a window or door? 2) do your cats only do this in the middle of the night and rarely during the day? A yes to either question is evidence that you have outside cats annoying your indoor cats. And until you keep those cats away from your home stopping the problems for your indoor cats may never stop 100%.

  • To keep outside cats away don’t feed them, look at installing Spray Away or The Water Scarecrow which use water to chase them away, hang up put shiny objects near your doors such as old CD’s or DVD’s (and keep the porch light on to reflect)
  • Give your cats our Territorial Rescue once or twice a day in food/water. You can also spray it around the house, and near the doors and windows.
  • Give your cats our Convivial House Cat who behaves in a manner similar to Feliway but is 100% natural and edible! It can go into food and water, as well as sprayed on objects or near the doors and windows.
  • Our Beneficial Crystals truly do boost effectiveness of both products when drops are applied.
  • Clean the outside of your doors with our Anti Icky Poo to remove any traces or urine and its smells. If you see a water mark at cat-butt-height that’s evidence of your doors being sprayed. Also check flower pots, chairs, and your car’s tires.
  • After you’ve cleaned the door off apply some of our Convivial House Cat or Territorial Rescue to the outside of the door and repeat as often as you can – this is going to help chill out the ferals!
  • We have customers who installed a Feliway diffuser on their porch and liked the results! You just need an outlet.

Another cause for fighting in the middle of the night is if one of the cats is getting old and kidneys are failing – perhaps one cat is yowling and this is upsetting the other cats (and disturbing your sleep)? If yes, this is a sign of kidney failure (and deafness which causes the yowling go hand in hand with kidney failure) Get to the vet this week!

  • Before you go to bed, go around the house and give a few random “here and there” sprays of Convivial House Cat or Multi Cat Household to a few objects per room.
  • A bedtime snack might help them stay calm – most cats will be happy with a tablespoon of a “mid-night snack.”
  • Feliway diffusers help too. We suggest 1 or 2 per room concentrating on the rooms where they spend the most time and/or near doors/windows.