Meet the Feral Cats of Disneyland. More “cats on the job!”

A few years ago we heard that Disneyland in Anaheim, CA had and actually cared for about 200 feral cats who keep the theme park free of rodents.

Cats roaming Disneyland were discovered in the 1950’s. Rather than “get rid of them” the park decided to house and care for them so they could help keep the park clear of mice and rats.

All of the cats are part of the program we know as TNR – Trap Neuter Release. The tipped left ear is what tells you that the cat has been spayed or neutered, and is part of a feral colony.

During the day these cats are kept from the public in special cat ranch hidden on the property. At night they come out to hunt and play! But sometimes one or two sneak out and make themselves seen. This home video shows one of them being fed a few scraps of food at the park’s Hungry Bear Restaurant:

This LA Times article from May 2, 2012 by Hugo Martin tells us all about them!

http://articles.latimes.com/2010/may/02/business/la-fi-cover-disney-20100502

Someone known as Aunt Peaches writes about the cats too

http://www.auntpeaches.com/2013/08/the-feral-cats-of-disneyland.html

PS: The Disneyland feral cats are specifically told not to bother these two mice…


Do you know of any “working cats” in your community?

We’d love to hear about them and we’ll print your story!

Submit it to: catfaeries@catfaeries.com

Subject line to read: My story: cats on the job

We’ll send you 4 catnip toys if we use your story!

How To Help Feral Cats This Winter

Winter is a cold and potentially dangerous time of year for feral and homeless cats, whether or not a polar vortex is pushing arctic air into your neighborhood. Here’s some ways to help.

Alley Cat Allies is a national advocacy organization dedicated to the protection and humane treatment of feral cats (www.alleycat.org). You may have seen their “I’m an alley cat ally” ads featuring Hollywood personalities including Portia De Rossi. Alley Cat Allies has posted a good article on how to help feral cats during the winter at www.alleycat.org/WinterWeather.

Another way to help is to contact one of your local feral cat organizations. Alley Cat Allies has a posted a contact form at www.alleycat.org/sslpage.aspx?pid=1452 so they can connect you with an organization in your area that is a member of their Feral Friends Network. They also have a National Cat Help Desk that you can contact via www.alleycat.org/sslpage.aspx?pid=1453.

You can also find local feral cat assistance groups by doing search via Google for “feral cat (insert your city or area).” Contact your local group and ask how you can help.

One of the best ways to help feral and homeless cats during the winter is to provide shelters to keep them warm and out of the weather. Here’s a great video on how to make a simple low cost shelter from a plastic tote box. It even includes a cute cat helper providing supervision.

Everyone loved the article we posted about the Boy Scout who built winterized boxes to house feral cats in his community. You liked it so much that we searched for blueprints for something similar you crafty folks could make your own. Here are some plans for a larger “Feral Cat Condo” from a Michigan animal rescue group – www.voiceless-mi.org/plans/

So get out there and help feral cats this winter. You may make some new friends – both human and feline.

Israel commits $1.3 million to Trap/Neuter/Release street cats

What wonderful news! Let’s hope this plan inspires countries and cities all over the world to do the same. The life of a street cat is brutal. Depending on circumstances such as weather and climate, a street cat’s life expectancy is just a few years. And those are generally years of hunger and misery. And more kittens, thus more and more street cats. The cycle can easily be broken.

http://www.care2.com/causes/israel-will-trap-neuter-and-return-45000-street-cats.html

“My female housecat isn’t spayed and I don’t see why I should do it.” The Wizard of Veterinary Medicine will tell you why, and with humor.

Good golly, it still amazes us that in 2013 we still need to have this conversation about spaying. Dr. Richard Orzeck, DVM who calls himself Dr. Oz the Wizard of Veterinary Medicine tells us why it’s vital to spay a female cat and he’s funny about it too. We are presenting two of his articles, one which is very funny, and one which is more scientific. Both are well done and informative, you’ll enjoy both and if you have friends who need coaxing about spaying, please forward this newsletter.


The funny version:

http://www.worldsvet.com/unspayed_diseases.html

The scientific version:

http://worldsvet.wordpress.com/2008/04/11/pyometria-ovarian-and-breast-cancer-diseases-of-un-spayed-dogs-and-cats/

Is that new kitten driving your older cats crazy?

Friend of Cat Faeries, Aldyth Beltane of All Creatures Healing Network in San Francisco places kittens in foster care until they are old enough or socialized enough for their forever home. Recently we talked about how those rambunctious kittens can drive older cats to a meltdown.

What to do?

Multi Cat Household to the rescue! It’s all about acceptance, tolerance (oh boy, you can say that again), giving space when it’s needed, not feeling your space is encroached upon, feeling that family bond, and chilling out from just about anything which annoys the modern housecat.

The other thing you can do is install as many Comfort Zone with Feliway diffusers as budget permits. The feline delighting pheromone spreads calm and friendship throughout the house as well as buys you insurance that someone won’t start peeing outside of the box.

Happy Spring! And hey: spay, neuter! Aldyth tells us that every year, it’s the same thing… far too many kittens are being born with few homes ready or able to take them and love them. Come on! Spay! Neuter! Donate to your shelter so they can help pay for spray/neuter for people who can’t afford it. Let’s solve this problem!

PS – you can tire out kittens with our cat toys and allow those older cats do get their beauty rest in peace!

The “Cats and Culture Tour” of Italy’s street cats and sanctuaries, October 2010

Of course we all love cats! And we all probably love Italy and all things Italian too. Who knew that the Italians have had a love affair with cats spanning centuries? Well, they love them. Street cats are not viewed as pests like they are in the US. They are fed and cared for, often by adorable ladies who sit down on park benches, feed the cats and relax in the sunshine
 

Friends of Roman Cats is a US based organization which raises money for the street cats of Rome and other parts of Italy and for the cat sanctuaries. They help pay for spay/neuter, medical expenses and food. They also raise money to spay/neuter cats in San Francisco. Here’s some information about this very unique and special tour. We hope you can go! Ciao Bella!

From the Friends of Roman Cats…
 
Friends of Roman Cats is excited to announce another Cats and Culture Italian tour this coming October! The tour offers cat lovers and lovers of Italy a chance to see how another country treats its homeless / feral cat population. Italy is a No-Kill country where cats have been appreciated for centuries for their companionship and for keeping down rodent populations. You will meet dedicated individuals who care for some of Italy’s stray cats and learn what is working and not working with Animal Welfare in another country. The tour will be a way for people to understand Italy and Italians through the way they interact with animals The tour will start in Venice where we will meet some of the cats whose ancestors came from the Middle East to combat plague-carrying black rats. We will visit a cat colony that lives in Venice’s main public hospital and see more cats and their dedicated caretaker on Venice’s Lido Island. We will have plenty of time to visit some of Venice’s greatest artistic treasures and take in its beauty.

The tour will proceed to Florence where we will see the cats that live in a magnificent Renaissance garden, and in a picturesque cemetery that looks down on the City. Participants will have ample time to explore this beautiful city. Then we will visit a cat sanctuary in the Tuscan hills on a property donated by a beneficent Countess. We will next visit the medieval town of Arezzo and meet with an Anglo-Italian veterinarian who has created a 21st century cat shelter outside the town. We will spend the next day and night in the beautiful hill town of Siena where we will have a guided tour of the town and visit with a group that works with the Sienese municipality to spay and neuter Siena’s stray cats. We will spend our last 3 days in Rome, visiting the Forum, Coliseum, The Vatican, the Trevi Fountain and other monuments in historic Rome, and as well as some of the cat colonies that live in the midst of Roman ruins. All the cats in the shelters and sanctuaries we visit have been spayed or neutered. A good number of them are former house cats that have either been abandoned or whose owners could no longer care for them.

The tour will begin on October 7th 2010 and end on Oct.19. The price for 15 people will be $3,025 double occupancy. A single rate of $549 is available and there is a $500 deposit that will be refunded if we do not get enough people by May 1. It will include 3-star hotels or better with breakfasts, some dinners, a comfortable private bus, a one-time transfer from the Venice airport to the hotel, vaporetto tickets for 2 days in Venice, entrance fees to some museums and historical sites, local city guides and all the cats you can desire! $250 of the price is a tax-deductible donation and goes to help the shelters we will visit. Susan Wheeler, President of Friends of Roman Cats will accompany the group. For most of the tour a tour manager will also accompany the group.

 The dollar is stronger right now than it has been in several years. This price is based on current prices so the sooner people sign up, the better. People who sign up before April 1 will get a $50 discount.

www.friendsofromancats.org