Dr. Cheryl Schwartz DVM on helping your Diabetic cat




When Dr. Cheryl Schwartz wanted to learn about veterinary acupuncture she found that a book on the subject did not exist – even in China where acupuncture originated. She turned to the text books for human doctors, and took courses in human acupuncture knowing she could transfer what she learned for people to animals. After years of treating patients with 4 feet and a tail she wrote her book “Four Paws, Five Directions, Traditional Chinese Medicine for Cats and Dogs” which is now a text book in China.




Here is a Cat Faeries exclusive Q and A with Dr. Cheryl Schwartz DVM:

1) I know that for my own diabetes (type 2) the ideal diet is very low carb, moderate protein, and high fat. It’s worked wonders. Would you say that a similar diet for cats who have diabetes or for people who don’t want their cat to get diabetes is a good idea? And what about for cats with kidney failure? It seems to me that both ways of feeding a cat is ideal.

Dr. Schwartz: Great ideas and questions! Low carb, moderate protein and high fat are beneficial for cats with diabetes and kidney failure

2) I’m eating a lot of organ meats (also known as offal). In particular, lamb sweetbreads*. Which by the way, my cats love (recipe to follow). How do you feel about organ meats vs muscle meat for cats with diabetes or kidney failure?

Dr Schwartz: I prefer small amounts of organ meat mixed with muscle meat, because higher amounts seem to create constipation and stagnation in cats.

* Cat Faeries Note: See below for two recipies for lamb sweetbreads – one for cats, one for people.

3) My MD has me on 70 grams of protein a day and I’m surprised that I’m liking eating less protein and more fat. What might you recommend for an average sized cat of about 11 pounds? What ratio of meat to fat to vegetable do you like?

Dr. Schwartz: I don’t usually break it down between fat and protein. I use more TCM therapy. I recommend the fatty meats like lamb, chicken, beef. Some cats with diabetes do well on stewed or boiled pork loin or butt. It is important to make sure the cat does not also have pancreatitis where fat metabolism/absorption can create more inflammation, so each cat seems to be unique. Ratio between meat and vegetables would be 2/3 meat to 1/3 veggies, including some sweet potato.

4) I no longer cook my own meats at a high heat because the high heat creates “advanced glycation” which happens inside the body when charred, grilled, or fried meat is consumed. I understand that this means it turns to sugar when it’s eaten and this is one of the reason diabetes is has become practically an epidemic for people, and also our cats and dogs. I steam, stew, boil, simmer, or poach my meats now and eat them pretty rare. Would you recommend those techniques for a cat’s meat? Do you have anything to say about advanced glycation and how to prevent it?

Dr Schwartz: High heat is present in dry food and it does increase the sugar content. I recommend stewing or poaching, or hot pot as best ways to prepare. If the cat can tolerate and like it, I would recommend raw food.

5) There has been a lot of talk lately about resistant starch and safe starches for people – basically steamed potatoes and white rice, severed with something acidic (like lemon juice), fat and served cold. For people it can be healing to the gut and it gives people some carbs which do not jack their blood sugar. Any value in this theory for cats?

Dr. Schwartz: I like steamed sweet potato or pumpkin for cats.

6) Are there safe carbs for a cat? Any safe grains?

Dr. Schwartz: It depends on the cat. I really like the sweet potato, pumpkin. Another alternative is mashed cooked lentils or garbanzo beans with cooked white rice. Adding a small piece of pickle* is sometimes tolerated by some cats. Either the cat likes it or not.

* Cat Faeries Note: Coming up in another newsletter, how to properly lacto ferment vegetables suitable for you and your cats.

7) Which fats are good for cats? For people ideal fats are saturated and those include: coconut oil, MCT oil, lard, grass fed butter.

Dr Schwartz: Cat Faeries fish oil mainly. Grass fed butter*, olive oil, small amounts coconut oil.

* Cat Faeries Note: www.mcclellandsdairy.com/ or www.pureindianfoods.com are who we buy our grass fed butter or ghee.

8) Which flower essences help cats with either or both conditions?

Dr. Schwartz: Kidney Kitty is good. It would also be helpful for diabetes cats

9) You are big on color therapy. Would you recommend shining a colored light on a cat?

Dr Schwartz: For the kidneys use blue light. Shine the light around the kidney area in lumbar vertebrae. For diabetes use yellow or green light and shine it at the end of the ribs (Thoracic V) and beginning of the lumbar as well as Spleen 6.

10) Any other therapies that a person might employ?

Dr. Schwartz: Other great modalities might be sound therapy with tuning forks.

11) What acupressure points are good for diabetic cats and cats with some form of renal failure?



For diabetes



For renal failure

(Photos from “Four Paws, Five Directions, Traditional Chinese Medicine for Cats and Dogs” used with permission of Dr. Cheryl Schwartz)



Your Cat Faeries’ Lamb Sweetbreads Recipie

Lamb sweetbreads are the pancreas and thymus of young sheep and they are one of the most nutrient dense foods there is. You only want to buy them from organic/pastured sources. To find them in your state: www.eatwild.com

  • Soak a pound or so of sweet breads in cold water for two hours
  • You might rinse them a few times during their soak
  • Strain in a colander in the sink
  • You want to pull off the big chunky fat pieces – the reason is that this fat isn’t delicious, it can be bitter, and the tough texture clashes with the dumpling like texture of the sweet breads
  • Try to remove some of the membrane without tearing or compromising the shape of the sweet breads
  • Cut them into uniform sizes so that they cook evenly. About 1 and a half inch pieces.
  • Par boil in gently boiling water for 5 minutes and drain

IF SERVING TO CATS – STOP HERE! The seasonings which are good and healthful to us are not good for cats (onion especially)

Continue on only for people…

  • Melt a lot of butter in a pan
  • Add some white wine and stir vigorously to make a slight reduction
  • Seasonings can include salt and pepper, a pinch of cumin powder, onion powder (organic and delicious onion powder can be bought at Azure Farms online)
  • Add the sweet breads
  • Simmer for 20 to 25 minutes. Interestingly, they do not dry out, yet if they are undercooked the texture isn’t very nice.
    At this point you can remove them and do a thicker white wine and butter deduction sauce by adding more of both, and stirring vigorously
  • You could even put some heavy cream in at this point or a bit of soft goat cheese
  • Put the sweetbreads back in the pan so the flavors marry with the sauce
  • Some people fry up the fat bits and have them separately
  • Leftovers are so good that they are even good cold!
  • You might experiment with adding cooked sausage and mushrooms

Reversing Diabetes World Summit 2014 – FREE and it’s happening NOW!

12 Days: May 5 to May 16, 2014

50 Presentations by truly groundbreaking individuals

Dr. Brian Mowll has put together one of the most impressive lineups of health experts you’ll ever see in one place for the Reversing Diabetes World Summit 2014. Included in the lineup are scientists, world-renown doctors, New York Times best-selling authors, popular web bloggers and writers, fitness trainers, and dietitians. We are especially excited to hear: Jimmy Moore, Mark Sisson, Izabella Wentz (who will talk about the thyroid – diabetes connection), David Perlmutter MD, and Mike Adams. We probably won’t miss a single lecture!

None of the speakers are veterinarians, but the information is going to be helpful to you anyway. The more we all learn about diabetes in any species the better we’ll all be. Perhaps next year there will be a vet on the roster!

This ground breaking FREE summit is a 12 day education on how to prevent, control, and reverse diabetes for you and those your love. The information that these experts have to share will benefit your health in countless ways even if you don’t have diabetes or are predisposed to it. Did you know that Alzheimer’s is being called Type 3 Diabetes? Sugar and carbs are not our friends!

FREE registration, click here: http://thediabetessummit.com/

Don’t procrastinate! Start listening to these podcasts right now because each day’s presentation is only available for 24 hours.

For the speakers and schedule click here: http://thediabetessummit.com/schedule/

A very special “Friend of Cat Faeries” is the wonderful (and Daddy to two cats) Jimmy Moore who will give his presentation May 9th on the Ketogenic diet. Jimmy is the creator of Livin’ La Vida Low Carb, and the author of “Cholesterol Clarity.” Read his books and blog and don’t miss his talk on the 9th.

You did NOT eat your way to Diabetes

We like this article because it brings up an important point about why diabetes is so prevalent and predicted to get much worse. Toxins and changes in our environment for many individuals might be the root cause, less so that the cause is genetic or “reckless eating.” This article is geared for people, but we think it’s obvious that if these toxins are causing insulin resistance or Diabetes for people then it makes sense that cats are just as vulnerable.

http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/14046739.php

Comb your cat – green uses for cat hair!

cat-and-fur

Spring is here and our furry 4 footed friends are shedding their fur, or in the case of Winston our bunny – it’s an outright molting!

When you brush of comb your cat (or dog or rabbit) don’t throw away the fur. Use it in creative green ways:

  • Bird nests: Grab a basket you don’t use and put the fur inside along with twigs, strips of bark, pine needles, and wood shavings. The birds will grab the bits and pieces which they want to build a nest. Cat fur will add some warmth to the nest
  • Compost: The nitrogen in fur and hair is wonderful for your compost bin. But since it takes a while for fur or hair to break down cut it into 1/8 inch bits, you could also toss it around your garden or let it the breeze take it to add nitrogen to your soil.
  • Pesky Critter Repellent: Putting wads of combed out cat fur around the garden near special plants can deter snails and slugs. Wads of cat fur put down a gopher hole could scare off the critter. It can also keep squirrels, hares, chipmunks, and deer away.

For these projects to do effective and safe, don’t use cat or other animal fur that was treated for fleas as the chemicals could kill or harm birds, and you would be adding poison to your compost.

How to keep those uninvited cats out of your garden? It’s easy!

We’ve been asked literally thousands of times for ways to humanely keep the neighbor’s cats or ferals out of flower and vegetable beds. And as you know from reading our website the number one trigger for cats peeing outside the box is the presence of cats in your yard.

We tried all kinds of battery operated gizmos to keep cats out of our rose garden and vegetable beds including the ones which shoot water when the cat comes within range. Some worked pretty well, and others failed. Some worked for awhile then they malfunctioned. We would never use toxic “pet repellents” And we certainly wouldn’t use cayenne pepper because if it gets into the cat’s eyes they could gauge their eyes out trying to rub at the burning pain.

A very astute Biodynamic gardener told us about something which has worked beautifully for us. We are avid organic gardeners and obviously we are devoted to cats, but frankly we were getting fed up with finding cat poop among the lettuces. Her suggestion sounded good, so we tried it.

It’s an old country Italian trick where you fill glass bottles with water then place them around your garden. Why does it work? The water filled bottles shimmer in the sunlight. This shimmer is something which does not exist in nature and the cat doesn’t understand it or like it, so the cat leaves right away.

We experimented with several different bottles until we decided that the pale green color of white wine bottles give the most shimmer in sunlight. Soak off the label. Fill the bottle with water and replace the cap. We think turning them upside down with the neck in the dirt looks sort of arty and whimsical!

For added shimmer and cosmic fun we’ve put a big crystal in the dimple of the bottom of some of the bottles.

We know that this remedy may sound crazy, but really, it works. It’s been 5 years now and we’ve not found a single "feline calling card" in with the roses or the vegetables. Other than the wine, it’s practically a free solution! This is the most economical, humane, and non toxic feline garden abatement we know of.

Shortly after we posted this tip we heard from a long time friend of Cat Faeries who is an Italian countess. She wrote to tell us that you see water filled wine bottles in gardens all over Italy. Many are near or under key plants. If the plants are particularly precious you might see several bottles grouped together. Thank you Contessa dearest for adding this for us!

The list of the top 11 “safe” cat foods for 2014 – just in! Get your copy!

Susan Thixton is Cat Faeries’ good friend and sister in crusading for impeccable quality in all things for cats.

She has just released her “List” of 11 cat foods and 22 dog foods which she considers to be the safest and of the highest quality, and which are trusted enough to feed her own cats and dogs. Most of them have signed The Pledge that their foods will be free of Chinese ingredients and that they will uphold and maintain her high standards of quality and integrity. Believe us when we tell you that most cat and dog food companies won’t sign The Pledge!

To get your copy of the list you need to donate anywhere from $10 to $50. Why pay for it?

Susan Thixton is about the hardest working person we know. Her dedication and commitment to you and your cats is unwavering. Selling this annual list is her only source of income and her expenses are high. She travels to pet biz trade shows where she can corner and speak with the makers of cat and dog foods. She attends the annual AAFCO meetings which cost $1,500 entry fees and travel.

Susan spends hours making phone calls and sending faxes. She works 7 (seven!) days a week, often chained to her computer until 10 or 11pm every night. And she’s got her own animals to feed, and a home to maintain. If she didn’t charge for this list she would not be able to be an advocate for us. Mind you, she loves this work, but she needs income to be able to do it.

This link will take you to the page that explains her list and the criteria she has set for food manufacturers – http://truthaboutpetfood.com/the-2014-list

This link will take you directly to the ordering page. Please donate the highest amount that you can afford – http://www.truthaboutpetfoodcom.mybigcommerce.com/