Pumpkin seeds – your cat’s new friend and a tapeworm’s worst enemy!

 

Pumpkins are in season right now and their seasonal yumminess has me not only eating them but thinking about their miraculous seeds and how they benefit both your cat and you!

Pumpkin seeds are a good friend to any animal – such as your cat or you – who might have parasites! Yes, face it, we all have them to some degree and they lead to many big health problems. Regular eating of ground pumpkin seeds will paralyze them so that they will lose their grip on the intestine wall. Once these uninvited residents have been loosened, they will be pooped out! Keep eating those seeds because there will be unhatched eggs which will grow up and we want to keep the flow of parasite removal going!

Parasites that cats can get:
Tapeworms
Roundworms
Hookworms
Flukes

How do pumpkin seeds work to kill parasites?

Pumpkin seeds contain cucurbitacin which is an amino acid that paralyzes leeching worms which causes them to lose their grip on the walls of your or your cat’s intestines. When they lose their grip, they are easily pooped out with no further intervention of your part. People can chew the seeds. Grind them for your cat’s food or to toss in your salad or sprinkle on other foods that you like.

How much ground pumpkin seeds is needed?
Cats – 1 teaspoon per day
You – ½ to 1 cup per day

Most cats do not mind the flavor of ground pumpkin seeds.
Always tell your veterinarian that you are giving your cat pumpkin seed powder.

Pumpkin seed pesto in your blender – your cat’s and yours:
Put in the blender…
½ cup of raw pumpkin seeds
1/8 cup good olive oil or coconut oil
BLEND AND STOP – Put a teaspoon in your cat’s food

Continuing for your meal add this…
A pinch of cayenne pepper
Lemon juice
Fresh US grown organic garlic
Greens such as parsley, cilantro, kale, spinach
Blend and eat

There are a few products for cats and dogs on the market which are pumpkin seed based. We checked and learned that the pumpkin seeds were grown in China. Do we, yet again, need say how bad it is getting food items from China? Aside from buying your own pumpkins right now (the edible kind, not jack-a-lanterns), scooping out the seeds, soaking them, dehydrating them, and then using a Vita Mix or other high powered blender to create powder) you can buy certified organic, grown in Oregon, pumpkin seeds. Our source of choice for US grown pumpkin seeds is Living Tree Community (https://www.livingtreecommunityfoods.com/product/pumpkin-seeds-american-family-farmers-grown-alive-organic/) who have dried them at 95* thus keeping them in a raw state, rich with enzymes and nutrients!

All you need is a coffee grinder and you can grind up enough to last your cat and you several days. We recommend that you do not use the same grinder to grind up coffee or hot spices. Many people have 2 or 3 grinders reserved for specific types foods to grind. Coffee grinders are easy to use and generally cost around $20.

Benefits of Pumpkin Seeds:

  • Good fiber – helps regularity
  • Loaded with nutrients including magnesium,
  • Prevents certain cancers including stomach, lung and colon cancers
  • Good for the heart
  • Contains antioxidants which reduces inflammation
  • Lowers blood sugar
  • Omega 3 fats
  • Anti parasitic
  • Tasty!

 
 
 
 

“The Cat Rescuers” documentary film

The Cat Rescuers is a new documentary film about the volunteer heroes in New York City who are trying to make a dent in the 500,000+ population of New York’s street cats, because as we know, the humane societies nationwide cannot do it all themselves.

See the 2 minute trailer!

http://catrescuersfilm.com/

Meet some of the city’s rescuers:

http://catrescuersfilm.com/the-rescuers/

Schedule of upcoming screenings:

http://catrescuersfilm.com/screenings/

Learn how you can host a screening in your community:

http://catrescuersfilm.com/host-a-screening/

The film isn’t available on DVD yet, but it will be available for purchase later this year! We’ll put a notice in our newsletter when it’s available (if you aren’t signed up for our newsletter, you can sign up here).

 
 
 
 

Cat Parents are getting smarter every day with Cat Faeries help!

We have some exciting solutions to climate change to tell you about. Farm lands with grazing animals is being lauded as THE SOLUTION. And even backyard gardeners, like us, can do it too with compost!

Here you can learn about “regenerative farming” or “regenerative ranching” and even “regenerative gardening in small spaces” which could very well halt and reverse climate catastrophe this short and eloquent TED Talk given by a 4th generation farmer who is also a friend and colleague of the ranch we get our own meat which will motivate you and make you feel hopeful. You’ll become another consumer who demands only foods grown or raised in a regenerative manner.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=suHCiRlT-oc

Something anyone with a garden, farm, or even has a nearby empty lot can do! Dump compost on it! It draws down C02 from the atmosphere and creates carbon rich soil which plants love! We share this video because it gives us hope. Each and every one of us can be WE that will save this planet while THEY don’t care and won’t step up. Share this one far and wide! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z91QsZA1l_w

From a blogger Acadia Tucker: “I want to make regenerative gardening easy because cultivating even a little bit of carbon-rich soil can make a big difference. Eric Toensmeier estimates that his own tiny carbon-rich backyard garden, about a tenth of an acre, can offset the carbon emissions of one American adult per year. For me, that says one thing: let’s grow some good food. It’s time.” https://www.greenamerica.org/blog/author-and-farmer-acadia-tucker-answers-questions-about-climate-victory-gardening

Fix the climate, prevent cat food shortages, and take back the one only planet which has cats on it and be a hero that future generations will thank!
 
 
 

Newton’s Purrspective: Climate Change and the Half Full Cat Food Bowl

Sir Isaac Newton is our Feline Editor At Large (just how large, he’s not saying) who writes very brainy and very well researched articles for us. Newton lives in the North East and is fond of storms, our catnip toys, a soft bed, sunbeams, and naps. He has an ongoing email flirtation with our Daphne. This is his current, and as always, very well done article.


Fellow cats! With all the crazy things going on in the world today I have to admit it is very tempting to curl up in my Cat Faerie bed and ignore it all. But it is time for everyone to step up and act responsibly for the good of our health and that of our planet. Remember – “There is no Planet B” as seen on a T-shirt! Another t-shirt points out – “Save The Earth, It’s the Only Planet With Cats!”

I know I got your attention when I recently talked about the dangers to our beloved sacred wild herb from screwy weather conditions, our beloved Catnip could be in peril. But I am sorry to be the bearer of more bad news. The situation is much worse than even I imagined. Climate change is also threatening our food supply! Yep, that’s CAT FOOD!

If you did not rise up and speak to your maids and butlers (perhaps by doing a little discrete nail sharpening on their shins) it is not too late to start your campaign. Climate change is here. And as they said in the 1960’s: “If you are not part of the solution, you are part of the problem.”




Isaac Newton

The central part of the US has experienced extreme weather conditions this past year. Of course, the most obvious adverse effect of too much rain is flooding. Property, lives and infrastructure have all been impacted. Our hearts go out to all the people and animals who lost homes, or more. The huge amount of flooding also affects agriculture, though the precise mechanism may not be so obvious. The good news is that the recent flooding did not happen during the growing season, so crops may still be planted and harvested on the normal schedule. The bad news is that any crop stored in barns or silos is at risk for water damage. Dampness can lead to mold, of course, rendering the crops unsuitable for food. Also, flood waters also carry dangerous contaminants such as pathogenic organisms, pesticides and other toxic substances.

Toxins could also remain in the soil after floodwaters abate. And as you know, everything is connected to everything else. The FDA has already issued warnings to farmers. https://www.fda.gov/animal-veterinary/cvm-updates/resources-animal-food-producers-flooded-central-southern-plains-us

Although this is a proactive gesture it reminds me that not all quality regulations are equal. Standards for human consumption are generally higher than those for nonhumans. In fact, the FDA report alludes to the fact that contaminated feed may be somehow permissible for domestic animals. I, of course, am outraged! Why should we dear animals eat food considered unfit for humans?

I’ve been talking about the effects of floods on crops. Are cats affected by the quality of silage? They certainly could be. We just don’t know all the potential pathways for toxins to move into our food.

As obligate carnivores we cats cannot be complacent about the quality of our food. Cat food can, and does, contain a variety of fruits and vegetables. You unknowing felines could be eating lettuce, blackberries and… yuck: artichokes! I kid you not. http://vetnutrition.tufts.edu/2017/07/research-update-new-insight-into-grain-free-cat-diets/ There is nothing wrong with a little vegetable or herb matter in the high-end cat food that was studied and I don’t even want to think what might be in bargain brands.

I will be 12 years old in August and I’ve lost my kittenish naïveté (though not the desire to play with bottle tops). I have definitely become more cynical about our government. The “Green New Deal” has lots of ideas to improve life for all in America. But, as with anything that originates in DC it will cost a lot money, and just as bad, it will take a long time, time which we don’t have. We cannot rely on THEM to fix the messes we are in, but must step up and WE must fix impending disasters that have already begun to befall this planet!

Frustrated individuals and communities are taking things into their own hands. Strategies range from youth educating older generations, to planning boards changing local building codes to towns filing suits against companies that threaten community resources. We have to demonstrate what we really want and need because those lazy-bones, bribe taking politicians rarely do the job they were elected to and paid to do.

As always, I urge you to make sure your servants get the facts and then get out and vote. In fact, don’t wait for November. Call or write NOW! I know most of us are frustrated, but we must not let apathy rule us. If I had opposable thumbs I would be calling my government representatives. Because your cat depends on YOU here are a few phrases, articles and videos that you should become familiar with we cats and our beloved people can live long and prosper.

Your friend,
Sir Isaac Newton, Feline Boy Genius and Cat Faeries Editor At Large

 
 
 
 

Springtime Flowers That Are Toxic to Cats: Banish the Bulbs! And Toxic flowers!

We are so in love with this time of year because everywhere you look wildflowers are popping up to say hello. Vendors at the farmer’s market are starting to bring in flowers. Nurseries have fantastic offerings too. But what rains on my flowery parade is when I ask a flower vendor if they know if a particular plant or flower is toxic to cats and they say they have no idea. Nor do they seem to care! Don’t you agree that if they are selling something they should know such details? I keep copies of this list of toxic flowering plants in my car to enlighten stores and other vendors. Here’s the Cat Faeries list of flowers to avoid in Spring along with what will happen to a cat if one is eaten, or the water they sit in is licked. Copy and paste, then distribute!

(copy and paste to word processing, print and take it with you when you buy flowers or plants)


Cat Faeries Guide to Spring Flowers Which are Poisonous To Cats

  • Azalea – heart failure and death
  • Clematis – vomiting, diarrhea, mouth ulcers
  • Crocus – severe vomiting and diarrhea, liver and kidney damage, respiratory failure, seizures
  • Daffodils – any part of the flower, stem, leaves can cause vomiting, stomach pain, diarrhea
  • Delphinium – death
  • Easter Cactus – vomiting and diarrhea
  • Foxglove – vomiting, diarrhea, cardiac failure, death
  • Gladiolas – vomiting, diarrhea
  • Hyacinths – heart problems, tremors, drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, breathing difficulty
  • Larkspur – constipation, drooling, convulsions
  • Lilies – All of them, any time of the year, absolutely all of them can kill your cat! Seizures are just the start! Flower, bulb and pollen are deadly.
  • Narcissus – shivering, convulsions, tremors, cardiac arrhythmia and heart failure
  • Rhododendron – Vomiting, diarrhea, coma, cardiovascular failure, death
  • Tulips – heart problems, drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, breathing difficulty
  • Wisteria – vomiting, diarrhea, could be fatal


At our house about the only flowers you’ll ever see are fair trade/organically grown roses. You cannot go wrong with a nice bunch of organic roses – they cannot make a cat sick. But you do need to make sure that they are organic and fair trade – many roses are sprayed heavily with pesticides and are shipped to the US from other countries which is so cray-cray to us when they grow well here. Demand locally grown pesticide free roses.

Besides roses we love Lilacs, another safe flower. Sadly their season is short so enjoy them while you can. Other cat-safe flowers include: African violets, Alyssum, Calendula, Bachelor’s Buttons, Begonias, Columbine, Coneflowers, Gerber Daisies, Hollyhocks, Impatiens, Nasturtium, Orchids, Petunias, Snapdragons, Sunflowers, Violets, and Zinnias.

If you are like me and love flowering herbs these make very sweet little rustic bouquets, darling in Mason jars: Basil, Bee Balm, Cilantro or Coriander, Chamomile, Lavender, Lemon Balm, Lovage, all of the Mints, Oregano, Rosemary, Sage, Tarragon, Thyme.

We also love giving and receiving flowers at other times of the year. This page will give you a pretty good overview of plants and flowers to avoid all year round:

http://www.1stinflowers.com/articles/poisonous-plants-for-cats.html
 
 
 
 

Your old mascara wand can help your cat (seriously!)

Two weeks ago, we told you that you can brush your cat with a toothbrush when applying Convivial House Cat or a few drops of one of our flower essences. The reason is that the bristles mimic the feel of a cat mother’s sandpapery tongue with the familiar sensation they loved as kittens, which is still very soothing to adult cats. We feel this maternal sensation benefits the usage of our products from the loving touch of something bristly like a toothbrush, and we just learned that a cleaned/bleached mascara wand has the same feel and purpose!

And because we are zero-wasters (or try to be!) and hope you are too we knew you’d be excited to know that your old mascara wands not only have benefits for your cat, but you can also be a wildlife hero! Wildlife rescue organizations and rehabilitation professionals use them to remove all sort of icky things like oil on a bird’s feathers or fur after a spill, mites, fly eggs and larvae. They love mascara wands for their small size and that the bristles are so close together. And yes, you can follow their lead and use one to remove similar debris from your cat’s fur.

We’d read that mascara wands were ok to use to clean around wounds, but wondered if that information was unsafe so we asked a favorite Friend of Cat Faeries, veterinarian and animal communicator Joy Mason (www.joymason.com) what she thought about using mascara wands to wound clean. This is what she said: “I have been thinking about the mascara brush and cleaning a wound. I would recommend it for brushing the cat, but not for cleaning a wound. If the cat has a wound, I would recommend cleaning it with Chlorhexidene and warm water, put some coconut oil on it or if it is really bad then use a high-quality honey to help it heal.”

Always wash and bleach the mascara wand when it’s time to get a new tube and send the old wand onto its new home! By the way for the health of your eyes, mascara should be discarded every 2 months, 3 months at the most.

Save one or two old mascara wands for your own use and mail the rest after you’ve washed and bleached them. How much bleach? Dr. Mason, also known as Auntie Joy tells us the Clorox bleach needs to be diluted with water. This is how her clinic dilutes it for dogs to prevent Parvo: “In the clinic we recommend that people use a 4:1 dilution of water to Clorox if they want to put a foot bath at their front door to prevent Parvo virus from being spread if there is an outbreak in their neighborhood “ The same dilution would be good for the mascara wand.

How to clean a mascara wand without making a huge mess!

As you might imagine cleaning off a mascara wand is messy! Auntie Cat Faerie using her Virgo logic came up with this easy method! While she hates throwing things away she hates wasting water more so grab some paper towels. While wearing disposable gloves use your paper towels to wipe off as much mascara as you can, otherwise your hands will be very stained. Using a few damp Qtips scoop out as much mascara as you can from where the wand in attached to the cap. An empty narrow glass jam jar the height of your wand with 1 part Clorox and 4 parts water will allow the wand to stand up straight making removing it easy for you. The bleach will most likely remove any traces of mascara that you couldn’t rub off. Rinse in hot water when finished.

If you don’t have a wildlife group near you here are organizations that want them:

Wildlife Wands
PO Box 1586
Southwick MA 01077
https://www.facebook.com/wildlifewands/

Appalachian Wildlife Refuge
P.O. Box 1211
Skyland, NC 28776
https://www.appalachianwild.org/wands-for-wildlife.html

Here’s a video from Appalachian Wildlife Refuge where you can see the wands in action (grab a hanky!)

Mascara wands can also “go where no brush has gone before” for use around the house in any small crevice where dust and gunk settles. Use one on your sewing machine, your computer keyboard, clean jewelry, clearing the lint catcher in your blow-dryer, even the little oxygenating vent in your faucet tap where the water passes through and gunk can build up (let the floodgates open!). They also gently clean off mushrooms!