COVID-19/Coronavirus and Cats. Coronavirus And YOU. We’ve got precautions.

So far cats and other animals are not getting this latest Corona Virus: COVID-19. But as we know, viruses can mutate so we are monitoring this closely and if conditions change and if cats are getting it, we’ll notify you immediately.

But then there is you dear reader, human customers who we care about greatly. After all, you are your cat’s caregiver, Maid or Butler, Litter Box Attendant, and personal Chef so it’s mandatory that you stay healthy to perform these duties! This article was compiled by Jeff Nobbs, a buddy of Auntie Cat Faerie. He’s smart. He’s practical. And he’s got a very cool head which is so refreshing right now. So. with permission from San Francisco blogger and co-owner of Kivava restaurant, Jeff Nobbs we present to you The Coronavirus Diet – supplements, dietary changes, and easy to do precautions that everyone can/should being doing now and in the future which go way beyond washing your hands for 20 seconds. (This is from Jeff’s blog that you can subscribe to.)



The Coronavirus Diet

by Jeff Nobbs

Part of what makes coronavirus so scary for some people is the feeling of helplessness. There’s no vaccine and no cure. We simply have to sit and wait and hope.

Maybe we’re not totally helpless though. Just like hand washing can help lower our chances of getting the virus, a healthy diet may aid us in fighting it off. If you contract COVID-19, you’re relying on your body’s immune system to recognize the enemy and create antibodies to defeat it.

If this were an actual war between humans, and there was an enemy at the gates, wouldn’t we want our army to be strong, well-fed, and ready for battle? The same logic can be used when we’re thinking about our immune system. We want our white blood cells warriors to be capable of swiftly defeating the enemy.

Just as human warriors who are starving, nearsighted, hard of hearing, or disabled would have a harder time defeating an enemy, our immune system has a harder time defeating viruses when it’s handicapped by a lack of nutrients.

You won’t hear this advice from most medical professionals. Nutrition is not well-studied by most doctors. Their continued education is often facilitated by pharmaceutical companies, not the kiwi fruit coalition. As a result, “natural” medical interventions are often used as last resorts, instead of our first line of defense.

Let’s take a look at what we can do to train our army of immune cells and prepare for battle with coronavirus:

Selenium

Eat a couple Brazil nuts every day.

Coronavirus seems to steal from your body’s selenium reserves. In addition, for immune cells to have a high killing capability, they need antioxidants to protect themselves, which are supported partly by selenium.

It would be smart to start eating foods high in selenium, including oysters, liver, and sardines. Shrimp, eggs, and salmon are all good sources of selenium as well. If you’re vegan or looking for the easiest solution, have a couple Brazil nuts every day and you’ll be getting all the selenium your body needs. Don’t overdo it on the Brazil nuts though–ten is not better than two in this case.

Vitamin C

Pop a Vitamin C tablet every day, 500–1,000 mg.

Vitamin C is helpful against many viral infections, but vitamin C deficiency is widespread. 31% of Americans have inadequate intakes of vitamin C. Vitamin C is needed to maintain levels of glutathione, the immune system’s primary antioxidant and a key component of being able to fight off pathogens.

Vitamin C is one of the safest nutrients. While many nutrients are actually toxic at megadoses, vitamin C has been found to be safe at almost any dose. It’s one of the most well-studied supplements, and certainly safe to supplement at doses of a few grams per day. Some doctors have suggested that megadoses of vitamin C are an effective treatment against coronavirus, but the jury is still out on those claims].

It is possible to get enough vitamin C from food, but you’ll have to eat a lot of citrus fruits, bell peppers, kiwis, broccoli, and kale. To be safe, it’s probably best to supplement with 500 mg of vitamin C per day.

Vitamin D, Vitamin A, Water

Get plenty of sunshine, drink enough water, and eat orange foods.

Wherever coronavirus might enter your body–mouth, nose, and eyes–you have compounds that kill pathogenic microbes. Secreting enough of these compounds is dependent on having enough vitamin D, vitamin A, and water.

The best source of vitamin D is the sun. The UV rays in sunlight also happen to kill viruses and give you an attractive tan. Triple win. If you don’t get much sun, consider supplementing with vitamin D3.

Eat foods rich in vitamin A, including liver and egg yolks. While the form of vitamin A found in plant foods is not as bioavailable, it is still helpful. Carotenoids like beta-carotene in sweet potatoes, carrots, and squash and lycopene in tomatoes are what give those foods their orange and red colors. Dark leafy greens like kale, spinach, and chard are also good sources of vitamin A precursors.

For water, you don’t need to overdo it. Just don’t be dehydrated. Listen to your body; if you’re thirsty, drink water.

Iron

If you eat red meat, don’t supplement iron.

Iron is a tricky one. While your body’s immune system needs iron to be most effective against pathogens, too much iron can also feed the pathogens themselves. Iron is an essential mineral for nearly all life, including coronavirus. Not enough iron and your immune system is limited; too much iron and your body can’t starve pathogens of this key mineral.

If you’re eating a real food diet that includes red meat, you’re probably getting enough iron from food. To prevent iron overload, avoid iron supplementation and give blood regularly (for men and post-menopausal women). If you don’t eat meat or shellfish, your risk of having excessive iron levels is low.

Vitamin C also enhances iron absorption, so there’s more for you and less for unwelcome pathogenic visitors.

Zinc and Copper

Enjoy oysters and dark chocolate.

Just like with vitamin C and iron, it’s important to get enough zinc and copper to give your immune cells the best chance of success in battle against coronavirus. Fortunately, the foods highest in zinc and copper are also delicious.

Shellfish and especially oysters are by far the best source of zinc, with a half dozen oysters per week mostly satisfying your zinc requirements. Chocolate is an excellent source of copper, with just a few squares of dark chocolate (85% or above) per day satisfying your copper requirements.

Cashews are also a good source of both zinc and copper.

Iodine

Eat stuff from the sea.

Iodine is an extremely effective mineral employed by our body for immune killing. Like with vitamin C, high dose iodine treatment has been used to cure some infectious conditions.

To keep your immune warriors strong, feed them a few hundred micrograms of iodine daily. You can supplement with iodine, or simply eat foods from the sea. On days you eat seafood, shellfish, or sea vegetables, there is no need to supplement.

My favorite form of iodine “supplementation” is to eat seaweed snacks.

Smoking and Air Pollution

Don’t smoke.

Coronavirus started in Wuhan, China, where air pollution is a major problem and a high percentage of the male population smokes. Whereas only 3% of Chinese women have smoked, 62% of Chinese men have been smokers at some point. The coronavirus death rate among men in China is 2.8% compared to 1.7% for women, and some point the finger at smoking rates to explain the difference [https://fortune.com/2020/02/19/coronavirus-china-smoking-rate-men/].

Coronavirus seems to work by binding to the ACE2 receptor in the lungs. One study found that cigarette smokers have a higher density of ACE2 receptors. If that relationship is causal, lung health may play a major role in fighting the virus, and air quality would play a role as well. While there’s not much you can do if you live in an extremely polluted city, you can certainly refrain from intentionally sucking down smoke in the form of cigarettes.

Summing it up, in order to boost your immune system in preparation for battle with coronavirus, you may want to get more of the following:

Brazil nuts, bell peppers, kale, kiwis, broccoli, liver, egg yolks, sweet potatoes, carrots, squash, oysters, dark chocolate, cashews, shellfish, seaweed, clean air, water, and sunshine.

Even if/when coronavirus is no longer a threat, we want our immune systems to be strong, healthy, and able to easily fight off infection.

Our immune system is not just sitting around waiting for the next outbreak; with every breath of outdoor air, we take in 50,000 germs]. While most of these germs do not cause us to get sick, they do keep our immune system busy, regardless of coronavirus.


To Jeff’s great blog piece Auntie Cat Faerie would like to add a few of her favorites:

  • Colloidal Silver – make your own for pennies. All you need is distilled water, a big glass jar to “cook it” in for 4 hours, and glass bottles to store it. Drink it. Wash hands with it. Clean your house with it. Spray it in your mouth and near your nose and eyes. Keep a bottle in your bag to spray your hands. The machine is easy to use and it’s American made: The Silver Edge.
  • Elderberry syrup – apparently it has to ability to bind with flu and cold bugs to purge them from the body. Two that I like: 1) Whitney’s Best which is Elderberry with honey and other herbs – very tasty; and 2) less tasty but powerful is undiluted Elderberry syrup from Western Botanical Medicine. It’s pretty intense and you don’t need much of it. Mix either into bubbly water for a refreshing and healthful mock-tail.
  • Microgreens. Did you read our article from a few weeks ago? If you are now growing your own double the amount you are eating every day. If you normally eat one cup of them, double it to two cups. One that is great for people (but NOT for cats) is leek micro greens which bind to microbes and viruses. You only need a little of this highly powerful and fragrant allium to battle the bugs and feel like Wonder Person.
  • My favorite Vitamin C is a powder from Marcus Rothkranz a well known raw fooder and plant expert. Just mix it with water for a nice tangy flavor. Add some Elderberry syrup to give it an extra boost. You can’t over-dose on this powder Vitamin C because it’s powdered plants – no rushing to the toilet!
  • And BE HAPPY. Really. It’s the best medicine. Laugh in the face of evil to disarm it. Laugh. Smile. Play with your cat. Be kind to others. Don’t shut down.

 
 
 
 

Pumpkin seeds – your cat’s new friend and a tapeworm’s worst enemy!

 

Pumpkins are in season right now and their seasonal yumminess has me not only eating them but thinking about their miraculous seeds and how they benefit both your cat and you!

Pumpkin seeds are a good friend to any animal – such as your cat or you – who might have parasites! Yes, face it, we all have them to some degree and they lead to many big health problems. Regular eating of ground pumpkin seeds will paralyze them so that they will lose their grip on the intestine wall. Once these uninvited residents have been loosened, they will be pooped out! Keep eating those seeds because there will be unhatched eggs which will grow up and we want to keep the flow of parasite removal going!

Parasites that cats can get:
Tapeworms
Roundworms
Hookworms
Flukes

How do pumpkin seeds work to kill parasites?

Pumpkin seeds contain cucurbitacin which is an amino acid that paralyzes leeching worms which causes them to lose their grip on the walls of your or your cat’s intestines. When they lose their grip, they are easily pooped out with no further intervention of your part. People can chew the seeds. Grind them for your cat’s food or to toss in your salad or sprinkle on other foods that you like.

How much ground pumpkin seeds is needed?
Cats – 1 teaspoon per day
You – ½ to 1 cup per day

Most cats do not mind the flavor of ground pumpkin seeds.
Always tell your veterinarian that you are giving your cat pumpkin seed powder.

Pumpkin seed pesto in your blender – your cat’s and yours:
Put in the blender…
½ cup of raw pumpkin seeds
1/8 cup good olive oil or coconut oil
BLEND AND STOP – Put a teaspoon in your cat’s food

Continuing for your meal add this…
A pinch of cayenne pepper
Lemon juice
Fresh US grown organic garlic
Greens such as parsley, cilantro, kale, spinach
Blend and eat

There are a few products for cats and dogs on the market which are pumpkin seed based. We checked and learned that the pumpkin seeds were grown in China. Do we, yet again, need say how bad it is getting food items from China? Aside from buying your own pumpkins right now (the edible kind, not jack-a-lanterns), scooping out the seeds, soaking them, dehydrating them, and then using a Vita Mix or other high powered blender to create powder) you can buy certified organic, grown in Oregon, pumpkin seeds. Our source of choice for US grown pumpkin seeds is Living Tree Community (https://www.livingtreecommunityfoods.com/product/pumpkin-seeds-american-family-farmers-grown-alive-organic/) who have dried them at 95* thus keeping them in a raw state, rich with enzymes and nutrients!

All you need is a coffee grinder and you can grind up enough to last your cat and you several days. We recommend that you do not use the same grinder to grind up coffee or hot spices. Many people have 2 or 3 grinders reserved for specific types foods to grind. Coffee grinders are easy to use and generally cost around $20.

Benefits of Pumpkin Seeds:

  • Good fiber – helps regularity
  • Loaded with nutrients including magnesium,
  • Prevents certain cancers including stomach, lung and colon cancers
  • Good for the heart
  • Contains antioxidants which reduces inflammation
  • Lowers blood sugar
  • Omega 3 fats
  • Anti parasitic
  • Tasty!

 
 
 
 

“The Cat Rescuers” documentary film

The Cat Rescuers is a new documentary film about the volunteer heroes in New York City who are trying to make a dent in the 500,000+ population of New York’s street cats, because as we know, the humane societies nationwide cannot do it all themselves.

See the 2 minute trailer!

http://catrescuersfilm.com/

Meet some of the city’s rescuers:

http://catrescuersfilm.com/the-rescuers/

Schedule of upcoming screenings:

http://catrescuersfilm.com/screenings/

Learn how you can host a screening in your community:

http://catrescuersfilm.com/host-a-screening/

The film isn’t available on DVD yet, but it will be available for purchase later this year! We’ll put a notice in our newsletter when it’s available (if you aren’t signed up for our newsletter, you can sign up here).

 
 
 
 

Cat Parents are getting smarter every day with Cat Faeries help!

We have some exciting solutions to climate change to tell you about. Farm lands with grazing animals is being lauded as THE SOLUTION. And even backyard gardeners, like us, can do it too with compost!

Here you can learn about “regenerative farming” or “regenerative ranching” and even “regenerative gardening in small spaces” which could very well halt and reverse climate catastrophe this short and eloquent TED Talk given by a 4th generation farmer who is also a friend and colleague of the ranch we get our own meat which will motivate you and make you feel hopeful. You’ll become another consumer who demands only foods grown or raised in a regenerative manner.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=suHCiRlT-oc

Something anyone with a garden, farm, or even has a nearby empty lot can do! Dump compost on it! It draws down C02 from the atmosphere and creates carbon rich soil which plants love! We share this video because it gives us hope. Each and every one of us can be WE that will save this planet while THEY don’t care and won’t step up. Share this one far and wide! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z91QsZA1l_w

From a blogger Acadia Tucker: “I want to make regenerative gardening easy because cultivating even a little bit of carbon-rich soil can make a big difference. Eric Toensmeier estimates that his own tiny carbon-rich backyard garden, about a tenth of an acre, can offset the carbon emissions of one American adult per year. For me, that says one thing: let’s grow some good food. It’s time.” https://www.greenamerica.org/blog/author-and-farmer-acadia-tucker-answers-questions-about-climate-victory-gardening

Fix the climate, prevent cat food shortages, and take back the one only planet which has cats on it and be a hero that future generations will thank!
 
 
 

Newton’s Purrspective: Climate Change and the Half Full Cat Food Bowl

Sir Isaac Newton is our Feline Editor At Large (just how large, he’s not saying) who writes very brainy and very well researched articles for us. Newton lives in the North East and is fond of storms, our catnip toys, a soft bed, sunbeams, and naps. He has an ongoing email flirtation with our Daphne. This is his current, and as always, very well done article.


Fellow cats! With all the crazy things going on in the world today I have to admit it is very tempting to curl up in my Cat Faerie bed and ignore it all. But it is time for everyone to step up and act responsibly for the good of our health and that of our planet. Remember – “There is no Planet B” as seen on a T-shirt! Another t-shirt points out – “Save The Earth, It’s the Only Planet With Cats!”

I know I got your attention when I recently talked about the dangers to our beloved sacred wild herb from screwy weather conditions, our beloved Catnip could be in peril. But I am sorry to be the bearer of more bad news. The situation is much worse than even I imagined. Climate change is also threatening our food supply! Yep, that’s CAT FOOD!

If you did not rise up and speak to your maids and butlers (perhaps by doing a little discrete nail sharpening on their shins) it is not too late to start your campaign. Climate change is here. And as they said in the 1960’s: “If you are not part of the solution, you are part of the problem.”




Isaac Newton

The central part of the US has experienced extreme weather conditions this past year. Of course, the most obvious adverse effect of too much rain is flooding. Property, lives and infrastructure have all been impacted. Our hearts go out to all the people and animals who lost homes, or more. The huge amount of flooding also affects agriculture, though the precise mechanism may not be so obvious. The good news is that the recent flooding did not happen during the growing season, so crops may still be planted and harvested on the normal schedule. The bad news is that any crop stored in barns or silos is at risk for water damage. Dampness can lead to mold, of course, rendering the crops unsuitable for food. Also, flood waters also carry dangerous contaminants such as pathogenic organisms, pesticides and other toxic substances.

Toxins could also remain in the soil after floodwaters abate. And as you know, everything is connected to everything else. The FDA has already issued warnings to farmers. https://www.fda.gov/animal-veterinary/cvm-updates/resources-animal-food-producers-flooded-central-southern-plains-us

Although this is a proactive gesture it reminds me that not all quality regulations are equal. Standards for human consumption are generally higher than those for nonhumans. In fact, the FDA report alludes to the fact that contaminated feed may be somehow permissible for domestic animals. I, of course, am outraged! Why should we dear animals eat food considered unfit for humans?

I’ve been talking about the effects of floods on crops. Are cats affected by the quality of silage? They certainly could be. We just don’t know all the potential pathways for toxins to move into our food.

As obligate carnivores we cats cannot be complacent about the quality of our food. Cat food can, and does, contain a variety of fruits and vegetables. You unknowing felines could be eating lettuce, blackberries and… yuck: artichokes! I kid you not. http://vetnutrition.tufts.edu/2017/07/research-update-new-insight-into-grain-free-cat-diets/ There is nothing wrong with a little vegetable or herb matter in the high-end cat food that was studied and I don’t even want to think what might be in bargain brands.

I will be 12 years old in August and I’ve lost my kittenish naïveté (though not the desire to play with bottle tops). I have definitely become more cynical about our government. The “Green New Deal” has lots of ideas to improve life for all in America. But, as with anything that originates in DC it will cost a lot money, and just as bad, it will take a long time, time which we don’t have. We cannot rely on THEM to fix the messes we are in, but must step up and WE must fix impending disasters that have already begun to befall this planet!

Frustrated individuals and communities are taking things into their own hands. Strategies range from youth educating older generations, to planning boards changing local building codes to towns filing suits against companies that threaten community resources. We have to demonstrate what we really want and need because those lazy-bones, bribe taking politicians rarely do the job they were elected to and paid to do.

As always, I urge you to make sure your servants get the facts and then get out and vote. In fact, don’t wait for November. Call or write NOW! I know most of us are frustrated, but we must not let apathy rule us. If I had opposable thumbs I would be calling my government representatives. Because your cat depends on YOU here are a few phrases, articles and videos that you should become familiar with we cats and our beloved people can live long and prosper.

Your friend,
Sir Isaac Newton, Feline Boy Genius and Cat Faeries Editor At Large

 
 
 
 

Springtime Flowers That Are Toxic to Cats: Banish the Bulbs! And Toxic flowers!

We are so in love with this time of year because everywhere you look wildflowers are popping up to say hello. Vendors at the farmer’s market are starting to bring in flowers. Nurseries have fantastic offerings too. But what rains on my flowery parade is when I ask a flower vendor if they know if a particular plant or flower is toxic to cats and they say they have no idea. Nor do they seem to care! Don’t you agree that if they are selling something they should know such details? I keep copies of this list of toxic flowering plants in my car to enlighten stores and other vendors. Here’s the Cat Faeries list of flowers to avoid in Spring along with what will happen to a cat if one is eaten, or the water they sit in is licked. Copy and paste, then distribute!

(copy and paste to word processing, print and take it with you when you buy flowers or plants)


Cat Faeries Guide to Spring Flowers Which are Poisonous To Cats

  • Azalea – heart failure and death
  • Clematis – vomiting, diarrhea, mouth ulcers
  • Crocus – severe vomiting and diarrhea, liver and kidney damage, respiratory failure, seizures
  • Daffodils – any part of the flower, stem, leaves can cause vomiting, stomach pain, diarrhea
  • Delphinium – death
  • Easter Cactus – vomiting and diarrhea
  • Foxglove – vomiting, diarrhea, cardiac failure, death
  • Gladiolas – vomiting, diarrhea
  • Hyacinths – heart problems, tremors, drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, breathing difficulty
  • Larkspur – constipation, drooling, convulsions
  • Lilies – All of them, any time of the year, absolutely all of them can kill your cat! Seizures are just the start! Flower, bulb and pollen are deadly.
  • Narcissus – shivering, convulsions, tremors, cardiac arrhythmia and heart failure
  • Rhododendron – Vomiting, diarrhea, coma, cardiovascular failure, death
  • Tulips – heart problems, drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, breathing difficulty
  • Wisteria – vomiting, diarrhea, could be fatal


At our house about the only flowers you’ll ever see are fair trade/organically grown roses. You cannot go wrong with a nice bunch of organic roses – they cannot make a cat sick. But you do need to make sure that they are organic and fair trade – many roses are sprayed heavily with pesticides and are shipped to the US from other countries which is so cray-cray to us when they grow well here. Demand locally grown pesticide free roses.

Besides roses we love Lilacs, another safe flower. Sadly their season is short so enjoy them while you can. Other cat-safe flowers include: African violets, Alyssum, Calendula, Bachelor’s Buttons, Begonias, Columbine, Coneflowers, Gerber Daisies, Hollyhocks, Impatiens, Nasturtium, Orchids, Petunias, Snapdragons, Sunflowers, Violets, and Zinnias.

If you are like me and love flowering herbs these make very sweet little rustic bouquets, darling in Mason jars: Basil, Bee Balm, Cilantro or Coriander, Chamomile, Lavender, Lemon Balm, Lovage, all of the Mints, Oregano, Rosemary, Sage, Tarragon, Thyme.

We also love giving and receiving flowers at other times of the year. This page will give you a pretty good overview of plants and flowers to avoid all year round:

http://www.1stinflowers.com/articles/poisonous-plants-for-cats.html