10 Reasons to adopt a Black Cat

10. You’ll save $$ on their Halloween costumes.

9. You can always find them in the snow.

8. Holding a black cat is very slimming.

7. Black cats will match any decor.

6. A lint brush isn’t required for a black-tie affair.

5. When you love a black cat, luck is on your side.

4. Black cats are like onyx, a beautiful gem.

3. Hey, they don’t care what color you are!

2. Love knows no color.

And the number one reason to adopt a black cat…

1. They are the least likely to be adopted.

Why You Should Keep Your Black Cat Inside Around Halloween (it’s good to keep all cats inside, all the time)

On Halloween, Thursday October 31st 10% of our sales will be adopted to Loup Garou rescue an organization devoted to the rescue and adoption of black cats and dogs!

For more information: http://www.loupgarourescue.org/

Why You Should Keep Your Black Cat Inside Around Halloween (it’s good to keep all cats inside, all the time) at CatFaeries.com

Here’s an article written by Loup Garou founder Jennifer Mieuli Jameson:


Halloween…my very favorite holiday of the year! Children dressed up as goblins and ghosts traveling door to door like scary salesmen, only they expect to be GIVEN something: a trick, or a TREAT! Treats are more popular these days, much to the chagrin of the parents whose little ones will be hopped up on sugar for days to come after the annual spookfest!

While it’s all fun and frolic for humans, this particular holiday can be difficult for our pets, and most especially for black cats. Long associated with witches and evil, every year at this time, we hear the warnings: shelters won’t adopt out black or orange cats at this time of year, or “keep your felines confined to the indoors, lest they meet with a terrible fate.” There is a risk, to be sure, but more of a risk is that your cat might be met with mischief perpetrated by Halloween pranksters. But the incidence of cats being sacrificed to so-called Satanic ritual is less actuality and more urban myth. While there are some reported cases, there are more times when our sleek black beauties are the victim of rambunctious Halloween revelers.

To be on the safe side, keep your kitty indoors. That way, the only peril he or she will face is the constant ringing of the doorbell as the Night of All Hallows is celebrated~!

Anti Icky Poo (the urine cleaner that works) and using a black light

Anti Icky Poo urine cleaner from CatFaeries.com

When using Anti Icky Poo urine cleaner, a black light is handy for finding places your cat has sprayed with urine or peed on. They are also helpful if you are considering buying a new home to find out if there are any urine stains.

But they are not fail safe – they are not accurate on all surfaces. They are most accurate on smooth surfaces like a painted wall or very low pile carpet. They don’t reveal urine in kitty litter or on carpets with a deep pile.

And you must use them in total darkness.

Recently we got this email from a customer:

Dear Cat Faeries

After treatment with Anti-Icky-Poo will spots still fluoresce under UV / Blacklight? I understand this is not as important as removal of the smell / pheromones is the most important, but still I’m just wondering, especially in terms of being able to identify a ‘new’ spot vs on previously treated other than intensity of the fluorescing.

Thanks,


Chuck

Dear Chuck,

Great question. The spots could still how under your black light. Here is why you may still see discoloration after using a round of Anti Icky Poo:

  • Staining or spots could remain if they have been there a very long time
  • The urine could have stripped the dyes from the carpet
  • The naturally occurring dyes in urine could still be in the fibers
  • Believe it or not, sometimes the dye you see is from the cat’s food!
  • Once you are confident that Anti Icky Poo completely got rid of the urine smells and gases, you might consider having a professional carpet cleaning service come in will help to remove the traces of urine dye

This week we also heard from another person who wondered if Anti Icky Poo is safe to use after her cat urinated in a house plant. It is totally safe – it won’t hurt the plant or taint the soil!

As you said and it’s also on our website, smell is the way to know that the urine proteins and gases are gone. Further evidence is observing your cats – do they hover around those spots you treated? If not, then Anti Icky Poo was completely successful!

As for knowing if those are old spots or new ones: You might keep a sheet a paper and list the locations and size of the stains you treated. If you use a black light every month or so this will help you know if the spots are old ones or new ones.

The Creepy and Scary Science of Flavoring Cat Kibble

Even if it wasn’t nearly Halloween this article would still be creepy! And eye opening. And contains some interesting facts. It’s a mix of scary chemical science which in Cat Faeries’ opinion is corporations analyzing the likes and cravings of both people and cats then creating health sabotaging frankenfoods to seduce us into eating them.

There are also many fascinating factoids. On page 2 you’ll learn about Pyrophosphates have been described as “cat crack.” On page 4 they explain the differences in how a cat eats from how a dog eats. On page 6 you’ll learn when animals hunt in the wild which parts of the prey a cat or dog goes for, and the nutritional value. Also on page 6 they discuss the origins of even our cravings for survival which is a mix of salt, sugar and fat – hence fast food addiction which plagues many people and is known as SAD (Standard American Diet).

From page 6:

Animals’ taste systems are specialized for the niche they occupy in the environment. That includes us. As hunters and foragers of the dry savannah, our earliest forebears evolved a taste for important but scarce nutrients: salt and high-energy fats and sugars. That, in a nutshell, explains the widespread popularity of junk food. And the wide spreads in general—an attribute we now share with our pets. A recent veterinary survey found that more than 50 percent of dogs and cats are overweight or obese.

After you read all 6 pages of the story be sure to check out the reader’s comments. Some of them are quite good (and as usual many of them are quite bad and idiotic):

http://www.popsci.com/science/article/2013-03/chemistry-kibble?page=0%2C0&src=SOC

3-time World Series Champion manager Tony La Russa has 17 cats! He talks about “people rescuing animals, and animals rescuing people.”

3-time World Series Champion manager Tony La Russa has 17 cats! He talks about “people rescuing animals, and animals rescuing people.” - CatFaeries.com


Former Chicago White Sox, Oakland A’s and St. Louis Cardinals manager Tony La Russa founded Animal Rescue Foundation (or ARF) in May of 1990 after a cat wandered onto the playing field in Oakland and was terrified by the roar of the crowd. When the cat was caught Tony and his wife discovered the area around Oakland did not have a single “no kill shelter.” They found the cat a home on their own, and then founded their own rescue organization.

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1797520-legendary-mlb-manager-tony-la-russa-has-equally-legendary-affinity-for-cats

This will take you to the ARF website. Be sure to read the history of ARF, the members of their Board of Directors, and their programs for both animals and people which we found to be inspiring and fascinating:

http://www.arf.net/

Why looking into your cat’s eyes can be an early warning on health problems

Guest editor Alison has another great story for you! It’s about why looking into your cat’s eyes, observing changes, and seeing the vet once a year is vital to your cat’s health and well being. We think you’ll enjoy this story and learn a few new things too.


CATS DON’T WEAR SUNGLASSES

I went to the local shelter looking for a black and white male kitten, but the only one there had already been chosen. There were SO many kittens in need of homes I couldn’t just leave. I sat on a chair inside the glassed in kitten room while all the furry bundles of energy ran and played around me. Soon a small black female climbed into my lap, grabbed the metal tab and unzipped my jacket. I could hear laughter from outside the enclosure and smiled. I knew I had been chosen. Tommy Lee Jones (Cat in Black) came home with me that day.

Many kittens leave shelters either recovering from, or incubating an upper respiratory infection (URI). Of course, I took Tommy to my vet right away for a checkup and she received a clean bill of health. However, I also kept her isolated from my other cats until I felt sure she wasn’t harboring a latent infection that could harm them.

According to the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) cats are less likely than dogs to have annual physical exams. In fact, overall veterinary visits for cats decreased 13.5% from 2006 to 2011, while visits for dogs increased 9.2% during the same time period. (https://www.avma.org/news/pressroom/pages/Dog-veterinary-care.aspx) Although there are many possible explanations for the decline, a likely reason is a cat’s natural ability to hide symptoms of ill health. In fact, we may not realize our cats are sick until a disease has progressed significantly. Although there is no substitute for a thorough veterinary exam we can help cats achieve longer healthier lives by becoming more observant as we interact with our feline companions. Even subtle changes could be significant.

These include:

  1. changes in food or water consumption
  2. weight gain or loss
  3. skin flakes, itchiness and/or hair loss
  4. changes in the eyes

Who can resist marveling over the beauty of a cat’s eyes? But how often do we look for subtle signs of disease in these windows to their souls?

Over the years I started noticing some brown flecks of color in the light green iris of Tommy’s left eye. At first I thought the change was my imagination. Had the flecks always been there? Then a small amount of ocular discharge appeared. She didn’t act as if the eye was painful or irritated, but a visit to the veterinary clinic was definitely in order. Fortunately it was nothing serious. The overall condition was diagnosed as iris melanosis. If the spots had been raised, rather than flat, she might have lost an eye to cancer. He suspected that part of her problem was a herpes virus (not contagious to humans) most likely acquired from an upper respiratory infection (URI) as a young kitten. Herpes virus can remain latent until stress or illness trigger the recurrence of clinical signs.

Tommy’s eyes are now examined regularly to be sure the pigmented areas do not become raised. She is also taking an amino acid supplement, L-lysine, to reduce the likelihood of herpes flare ups and potential corneal ulcers. However, I still can’t convince her to wear sunglasses.

Alison W. Certified Veterinary Technician, Reiki Master