Film maker Morgan Spurlock spends a week at an animal shelter!

Film maker Morgan Spurlock spends a week at an animal shelter!

Didn’t you just love Morgan Spurlock’s film Super Size Me? Currently he has a series on CNN called Inside Man. Just like in Super Size Me he physically dives into the week’s topic. In the episode which just aired called “Pets in America” he works for one week at The Animal Rescue League of Berks County in Reading, PA so he can firsthand experience everything that happens. He nurses a 3 day old kitten who was not expected to live (but did!) to cleaning kennels and witnessing euthanasia.

“Where I worked in Reading, PA is one of thousands of these types of shelters across the country. You see these animals who are so sweet and so nice and a lot of them who won’t get adopted and will end up getting killed. That’s the sad side of the story. But the fact that there are people who every day make them first in their lives is phenomenal.” -Morgan Spurlock

In this short interview Morgan gets interviewed about this episode of “Inside Man” and what he learned about cat and dog over population.

We tried to find a copy of the episode online for those of you who missed it, but we couldn’t find one. If CNN releases it for online viewers we’ll let you know. It will be repeated on CNN so if you have a DVR you’ll find repeats of this show.

Fish Oil is Back! ProNova – guaranteed to be free of mercury and radiation!

Fish Oil is Back!  ProNova - guaranteed to be free of mercury and radiation! at CatFaeries.com

When the evidence was mounting about radiation levels from Fukushima in Pacific Ocean fish we stopped carrying wild caught salmon fish oil. After 3 years of searching we found fish oil which is tested twice for heavy metals like Mercury, and for radiation. It’s tested once in Scotland where the fish is caught, and again in the US. It is guaranteed that this fish oil is free of mercury, other pollutants and heavy metals, and radiation.

You’d need to eat buckets of fish to get a healthful amount of Omega 3. Because of Fukushima we stopped eating fish 3 years ago. But we worried that we and our cats were not getting enough Omega 3 even from grass fed/pastured meats. That was until we found ProNova Fish Oil from Scotland.

Every batch of ProNova Fish Oil is tested for Mercury, other pollutants, and radiation – twice!

To say that Cat Faeries are finicky about quality is an understatement! We spent a huge amount of time seeking out fish oil that we consider to be safe and it wasn’t easy. We looked at fish oils produced just for cats and we looked at fish oils produced for people. But no other brand could or would discuss our concern of heavy metals or radiation.

You’ll find cheaper fish oils – that’s the problem, they are cheap in every way from the questionable quality of the fish, and in production of the oil where it can be oxidized. You and your cats deserve the best which is why you are a Cat Faeries customer in the first place!

Fish oil soft gels may be punctured and oil squeezed into food. For cats ½ to 1 soft gel daily. For people – follow the instructions on the bottle.

Daphne and Madeline both say:

“Ok feline brothers and sisters, get ready for your fur becoming ‘fluff city’ and your body feeling loosey goosey like a kitten again! Madeline’s fur has gone from feeling coarse to feeling like butter. We both feel like spring kittens because of what this fish oil is doing for us. And our “Maid” says she’s feeling years younger, which is good, because we keep her very busy tending to our needs!”

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Energy Healing – anytime you need it!

For the past few years we’ve offered energy healings every Spring. Now you can order a healing for your cat, yourself or anyone else anytime you need to.

Cat Faeries’ behaviorist is trained in energy healing. It’s a technique similar to Reiki which you may have heard of. However this method is much older and is based upon healing and compassion. Reiki sessions can range in price from $30 to over $100. We feel that this work is a gift and that it should be affordable to all especially for those who love and care for several animals or friends. At present our Energy Healing fee is only $15.

When you place your order you get an emailed copy and so do we. We will email you back and ask that you attach a photo of the cat, person, or other animal who is in need of the healing. We must be able to see the face and eyes to make the connection. We’ll also ask you to tell us briefly what the condition is so we can focus on it.

When we do the healings: We devote 3 days a week to doing this work. Each animal or person will receive their long distance energy healing 3 times and on each of the three days we’ve set aside.

Here are some of the conditions we can help address:

• Kidneys
• Thyroid
• Arthritis
• Pain
• Viruses
• Injuries
• Urinary system
• Immunity
• Pain
• Past abuse
• Fear
• Depression

In addition to Energy Healing we are offering Energy Plus. It is the same 3 energy healing sessions plus we will craft a custom flower formula just for you or your animal friend and mail it to you.

The formula is on what you told us when you ordered, and any impressions we pick up during our energy work. We will draw upon our pharmacy of several hundred flower, tree, root, and other plant medicines and their vibration. We’ll save your formula if you should wish to reorder. We can certainly revise your formula in the future if you wish.

Meet the Feral Cats of Disneyland. More “cats on the job!”

A few years ago we heard that Disneyland in Anaheim, CA had and actually cared for about 200 feral cats who keep the theme park free of rodents.

Cats roaming Disneyland were discovered in the 1950’s. Rather than “get rid of them” the park decided to house and care for them so they could help keep the park clear of mice and rats.

All of the cats are part of the program we know as TNR – Trap Neuter Release. The tipped left ear is what tells you that the cat has been spayed or neutered, and is part of a feral colony.

During the day these cats are kept from the public in special cat ranch hidden on the property. At night they come out to hunt and play! But sometimes one or two sneak out and make themselves seen. This home video shows one of them being fed a few scraps of food at the park’s Hungry Bear Restaurant:

This LA Times article from May 2, 2012 by Hugo Martin tells us all about them!

http://articles.latimes.com/2010/may/02/business/la-fi-cover-disney-20100502

Someone known as Aunt Peaches writes about the cats too

http://www.auntpeaches.com/2013/08/the-feral-cats-of-disneyland.html

PS: The Disneyland feral cats are specifically told not to bother these two mice…


Do you know of any “working cats” in your community?

We’d love to hear about them and we’ll print your story!

Submit it to: catfaeries@catfaeries.com

Subject line to read: My story: cats on the job

We’ll send you 4 catnip toys if we use your story!

Johnny Cash Cuddles a Kitten

Johnny Cash’s birthday was last week on the 26th! Isn’t he cool with his feline friend? He was the coolest of the cool!

johnny-cash-kitten-500

Feline Genetics – Mapping Cats’ Genome Project

(What is a genome? A genome is an organism’s complete set of DNA, including all of its genes. Each genome contains all of the information needed to build and maintain that organism. In humans, a copy of the entire genome—more than 3 billion DNA base pairs—is contained in all cells that have a nucleus.)

Did you know there are 12 cat racial groups around the world?

Here’s a fascinating article from the San Francisco Chronicle on a project to map the genome of the house cat. The scientists are mapping the DNA of 99 cats from all over the world.

Once they’ve mapped the cat genome, the full database will be posted on the Internet. Researchers will be able to use the information to research cat health links to genetics and cat ancestry. This may someday lead to DNA testing for cats being available to vets to help in maintaining our kitty’s health. It can also help humans, by aiding research for diseases that affect both cats and people.

Someday, we may even have a DNA testing service like 23andme for our kitties!


Scientists set out to map whole genome of cats – 99 of them

Stephanie M. Lee

Cats may not have nine lives, as the myth goes, but they do have 38 chromosomes.

And a team led by a former UC Davis professor is trying to understand those genes by sequencing a lot of cats – 99 cats, to be precise.

Leslie Lyons is fond of cats – she is the proud owner of two – but that’s not why she is pursuing this project. As sequencing technology grows faster, more comprehensive and more precise, scientists in general are mapping the genomes of humans, dogs, cows and other mammals.

But Lyons, who now works at the University of Missouri, says the cat genome remains relatively un-deciphered. A full mapping of those 20,000 genes in various breeds could help pinpoint the genetic cause of distinguishing marks, like fur and eye colors, but also of cat health problems, she says. It could even shed light on diseases that can occur in cats and humans alike.

“When a sick cat comes along, you could genetically sequence it and say, ‘Hey, look, this has a variation we’ve never seen before,’ ” said Lyons, who is collaborating on the project with San Mateo company Maverix Biomics. “It might give us clues very quickly as to what genes to focus on for this cat’s health care.”

Right now, it’s too early to tell whether protective pet owners or veterinarians would be willing to fork over the cash to sequence their cats’ genomes, said David Kirkpatrick, a spokesman for the American Veterinary Medical Association.

But pet owners in the United States do go to great lengths to take care of their animals, spending $26 billion on supplies, over-the-counter medicine and veterinary care in 2012, according to the American Pet Production Association.

In the not-too-distant future, perhaps, a trip to the vet could include a DNA test.

“We want to bring the health care standards of our pets to a comparable standard for humans,” Lyons said.

From 9 cats to 99

The project, called the 99 Lives Cat Whole Genome Sequencing Initiative, grew out of an original plan to sequence just nine cats. But Lyon and her colleagues decided that nine lives were not enough to build a truly complete genetic portrait, so they upped the sample size.

The work requires samples from kitties that are spayed and neutered. The cats’ leftover ovaries, uteruses and testicles contain DNA that can be easily extracted.

So the scientists are seeking cat samples from Greece, India, China, Russia, the Galapagos and Madagascar, to name a few. They want all kinds of breeds: the silky-haired Maine Coon and the American shorthair, the spotted Egyptian Mau and the blue-eyed Siamese. They want both purebreds and housecats that are a little bit of everything.

12 racial groups of cats

Like humans, cats belong to different racial populations, Lyons said. Felines from the United States, Britain and Canada tend to match up genetically with each other – not surprising, because most share a fluffy ancestry that originated in Western Europe.

Their genetic profile differs from that of cats in Egypt, which in turn are distinct from their counterparts in Southeast Asia and the Middle East. All in all, there are about 12 racial groups, Lyons said.

“What (humans) really want to do is figure out all the genetic variations in our genomes,” she said. “It varies with where you live in the world and what ethnic group you are, and that’s true with cats, too.”

Assisting in the sequencing are the University of Missouri, Cornell University, Texas A&M University and UC Davis. Funding also comes from Zoetis, an animal health company; the Winn Feline Foundation, a cat health nonprofit; and Procter and Gamble, which makes cat and dog food.

An Abyssinian named Cinnamon was the first cat to be genetically sequenced in 2007, but the technology then was more primitive and only picked up about 60 percent of her total DNA.

The technology Lyons uses now will pick up virtually all of it, but mapping each genome will take weeks or months and cost about $8,000. Sequencing all 99 whiskered creatures will generate a huge amount of data – 168 terabytes. (A typical desktop computer has 1 terabyte of capacity.)

All that data will be uploaded into a cloud-based website that will allow anyone to view, search and annotate it.

“They can share that information very easily among researchers, rather than having to ship it around to researchers from lab to lab,” said Dave Mandelkern, president and co-founder of Maverix Biomics, which is operating the website.

Implications for humans

The data could have implications for humans who suffer from illnesses such as polycystic kidney disease and spinal muscular atrophy – diseases that also affect cats.

More immediately, the project could help researchers like Niels Pedersen, a UC Davis professor emeritus who helped with the sequencing. Pedersen, for example, is trying to better understand the genetic causes of feline infectious peritonitis, a fatal illness in cats.

“Using the tools we had at the time, we can see that there are some genetic factors that might be important,” he said. “To really define them … we really need to move to the whole genome sequencing.


Intriguing, isn’t it?


Everyone at Cat Faeries, and many friends, have done 23 and Me to learn about our individual genetics.

Here’s something fun to know about our founder, Mrs. Cat Faerie – she has 3% Neanderthal DNA. This is .8% higher than average and puts her in the 94th percentile (if only she did so well in school!) Mr. Cat Faerie has some Neanderthal DNA too, his is 3.1%. And you may have some too. This is why a service like 23 and Me, and all the genome research that’s being done, is so fascinating – and fun! And you might learn about some health predispositions.