Can your cat predict an earthquake?

As many of you know we are work and live in San Francisco. As a native your cat faerie has been through countless earthquakes, most minor, but some quite major like the 1989 Loma Prieta quake which happened during a World’s Series game played at SF’s Candlestick Park.

Saturday night at 3:20 am there was a 6.0 (some reports say 6.1 but who’s counting!) earthquake centered in Napa which is one of the vital valleys of our wine country. Some 60 miles or an hour away by car it woke us up and we felt every dramatic wave and shake. Fortunately for us not even one can of cat food toppled over!

Do animals know before that an earthquake is coming?

After the devastating earthquake in Kobe, Japan a Japanese university began to study animals and earthquakes. Can they predict them? How far in advance do they feel that something is coming? Your cat faerie was part of that study and answered the many pages long questionnaire.

For us personally before this most recent quake, the cats were fine, no out of the ordinary behavior. But we suspect that cats being cats would only alert us or act strangely if a quake would be serious and affect our home or immediate area – which this one did not. Napa on the other hand got hit very hard.

But our bunnies were a different story. For the 3 days leading up to this earthquake several of them were fighting. Rabbits being animals that burrow underground might be more sensitive to the earth’s movement than cats or dogs.

The Save A Bunny rabbit rescue in Mill Valley (in Marin County and about 20 minutes closer to Napa than we are) reported that night their bunnies were thumping in unison – they knew something was coming and were thumping to alert everyone around them.

We’ve been told that African Gray parrots will hang upside down their cages prior to an earthquake.

Jim Berkland, a now retired geologist, has been predicting earthquakes for years. He uses lunar phases, and tides, and most interesting, he observes animals.

What he has observed is a spike in missing cats and dogs on posters and in newspapers a few weeks before a big quake, for example the horrible Northridge quake of 1994. Cats and dogs will sense something is coming so if they have access to outside, they often run off.

We found a really good story about Jim and his predictions written in January of 2014. It’s a great read, we know you’ll enjoy it. Interestingly Jim still lives in Northern California, in Glen Ellen which is the Sonoma side of the wine country. It looks like he isn’t leaving anytime soon! We aren’t either!

Sonoma Index-Tribune – Ready for the Big One

Being safe during an earthquake:

  • As soon as you feel an earthquake stand in the frame of the nearest doorway. Door frames are structurally very strong and if something falls it probably won’t hit your head. Don’t stand near a refrigerator or anything else that can topple over.
  • As soon as you can turn off your gas! Don’t know how? Learn this week. Also this week, strap your water heater so that it can’t tip over.
  • Aftershocks can occur minutes, hours, days, or weeks later. Some aftershocks can be as strong as the actual quake, but usually they are less so.
  • It’s not always safe to be outside – chimneys can fall, buildings can collapse, glass windows can pop out of their frames sending dangerous shards flying. If the building you are in seems unstable go outside but stand in the center of the street.
  • This week look over your emergency food and water stash. Discard anything with old expiration dates and replenish. Have flash lights and batteries. Maxi pads make great bandages because they are so absorbent, just wrap medical tape around them. Keep a large jar of cayenne pepper – it stops bleeding in seconds when poured on a gash. (really!)
  • Keep your emergency items in plastic garbage cans with the lid on securely. If something falls on it, the contents will probably not get broken. They also won’t get damaged by water.
  • You can buy emergency kits for your car from The American Red Cross. You never know when you might need it for yourself or your passengers, or another injured person you may encounter.
  • Don’t ditch your land line! In the event of an earthquake and so many other disasters where the power can go out that cell phone is not going to work. You want an old school phone that goes into a wall jack. Have a land line for emergencies and you’ll be the first to be able to call out for help, or to let friends and relatives know that you are safe.

Here’s a presentation titled “Earthquake Prediction and Animals” that describes the behavior of all sort of animals and even insects before a major earthquake. It’s really fascinating!

People love to ask us Californians, “What does it feel like?” The first thing is what you hear, which can sound like a loud crack or like a Mack truck hit your house. A split second later it’s like a giant grabbed your house and is shaking it. It might also feel like a long steady roll. You’ll probably hear the rattle of drinking glasses and plates clanging. Pictures on the wall start to sway or even bounce, a chair might dance across the floor. You might hear or see things fall over.

Have any of your cats or other animals warned you of earthquakes or any severe natural disaster, like a life threatening storm? We’d love to know for a follow up to this article.

How to talk to your vet about tough subjects, part two of two

In part two we give you some phrases that you can use to approach your doctors with intelligence and a firm hand, while remaining respectful. It’s a tricky juggling act, but it can be done with great results for everyone including a doctor who could learn a new trick, from you! (If you didn’t see the first part here’s How to talk to your vet about tough subjects, part one of two)

I just read a book…
“I just read a really interesting book about _____________. I learned many fascinating things which I think will really help me/my cat. I bought you a copy which is yours to keep and make notes in. If we don’t have time today to discuss some of the key points I’d like to set up an appointment or phone time. Would you have your front desk contact me when you’ve had a chance to read the book?”

Requesting tests
“I’ve read that sometimes basic testing isn’t enough to get to the root cause of many illnesses or diseases. After doing a bit of research I learned that testing for _____________ can be beneficial and shed light. Would you please order this test for me/my cat.”

If the doctor balks at about ordering the tests, don’t give up.
“Would you explain to me is detail why you feel it’s not valuable to test for ________?” I found many references between _______ and _____ so I’d really like to pursue advance testing, this week.”

If the doctor says “We only test for conditions that we can fix.”
Yes, that was once said to your cat faerie. Her comeback was:
“Well, I enjoy hunting for treatments and resources, I love turning over rocks and seeing what’s under them. So let’s go ahead and run the test, see some numbers, and I can do some research. Even if I come up with nothing at least we tried. I am paying for the test after all.”

The doctor does not know about alternative therapies, or thinks they are weird or don’t work.
We saved the toughest for last. Doctors paid a premium for their training and it’s very dear to them. So anything that wasn’t in their curriculum is often mysterious, threatening, and viewed as weird, not effective, or maybe even dangerous. They could have had instructors who warned them that alternative treatments are bad.

“I know that __________ isn’t your thing, but I’ve read good things about it, and I have a friend who used ___________________ and it worked out really well. Would you consider:

  • Reading this book
  • Reading this website or forum
  • Reading this report
  • Calling this clinic/specialist (provide name and phone number, or email) for some advice
  • Transfer a copy of my/my cat’s file to a practitioner that I found so they can review the history. I’ll have you copied on results.

If you seek the advice of another doctor or specialist, keep your vet in the loop by forwarding test results, treatment and progress for the file. If you doctor or vet knows you’ve sought out other directions, but kept him/her informed they won’t feel slighted, and everyone will benefit. It’s very possible that your doctor/vet will be impressed and learn a new modality. We’ve seen this happen first hand! We let a very skeptical, eye rolling veterinarian sit in on a session with an animal chiropractor. He was so impressed that not only did he study veterinary chiropractic he went on to become an instructor!

We often get emails from people who say: “My vet is really great. I wish I could find an MD as wonderful of my vet!” Cat Faeries is always here to help your cat AND you. Your cat faerie recently stuck gold here when she found her new MD from this list. You can search by state for doctors who are hip to diet + health which is hard to find: http://lowcarbdoctors.blogspot.com

Coming soon! Food allergy testing for cats and dogs! It’s easy! It’s effective and affordable.

Cats often need baby food, learn which is using GMO’s!

From time to time your vet will recommend that your cat be fed baby food for a period of time. Usually the cat has been sick and is vulnerable to toxins and stresses to the body.

Gerber is using GMO ingredients, and ingredients doused with the herbicide Roundup. If these ingredients harm babies they are likely to harm our cats.

Our sources tell us that Beechnut is not using GMO’s or ingredients which have had Roundup (or similar) applied to them. At this time Beechnut would be the ideal choice for any cat who is sick or being fussy.

One of the many reasons to avoid feeding cats GMO food is that these modified foods have shown to compromise kidneys. I don’t think we need to point out that renal failure is a common occurrence in cats. It’s something we cat lovers try to prevent. GMO’s also harm the liver.

Note: Both brands removed onion powder from their foods a long time ago in response to mothers protesting that if it’s bad for cats, it would be bad for babies.

CALL Gerber and give them an earful. Available 24/7: 800-284-9488

Here is a really good article about GMO’s and why they are so bad:

http://melisann.hubpages.com/hub/What-Genetically-Modified-Foods-Do-to-Our-Bodies

A Story in Pictures About Shelter Cats

 
 

Here are the top 5 most common names for cats

Here are the top 5 most common names for cats (provided by a pet insurance company):

1. Max
2. Lucy
3. Smokey
4. Shadow
5. Charlie

And from the same pet insurance company these names were the most unique:

Purrsia
Stevie Thunder
Princess Lollipop
Catmandue
Lady Marmalade
Peter the Great
Halley Beri Flufferton lll
Candy Corn

Feral cat saves woman from depths of depression and homelessness

You are going to need a box of Kleenex for this story. In 2000 electrician Roza Katovitch suddenly lost her fiance to a heart aneurysm. Three days later her father died. This sent Roza into a tailspin which led to depression and eventually homelessness because she was not emotionally able to work.

Every day she would go to the cemetery where both men are buried to tend to their graves. And she would be there all day long. She got to know the animals who came around. There were skunks, birds, raccoons and of course, feral cats. Carolyn Jones staff writer for the San Francisco Chronicle will tell you the rest of Roza’s story in this article which ends well for Roza and Miss Tuxedo the cat, with great photos.

And yes, we noticed that her last name is KATovitch! Cats must be her destiny!

San Francisco Chronicle – Homeless woman and cat who met in cemetery save each other