How to talk to your vet about tough subjects, part two of two

In part two we give you some phrases that you can use to approach your doctors with intelligence and a firm hand, while remaining respectful. It’s a tricky juggling act, but it can be done with great results for everyone including a doctor who could learn a new trick, from you! (If you didn’t see the first part here’s How to talk to your vet about tough subjects, part one of two)

I just read a book…
“I just read a really interesting book about _____________. I learned many fascinating things which I think will really help me/my cat. I bought you a copy which is yours to keep and make notes in. If we don’t have time today to discuss some of the key points I’d like to set up an appointment or phone time. Would you have your front desk contact me when you’ve had a chance to read the book?”

Requesting tests
“I’ve read that sometimes basic testing isn’t enough to get to the root cause of many illnesses or diseases. After doing a bit of research I learned that testing for _____________ can be beneficial and shed light. Would you please order this test for me/my cat.”

If the doctor balks at about ordering the tests, don’t give up.
“Would you explain to me is detail why you feel it’s not valuable to test for ________?” I found many references between _______ and _____ so I’d really like to pursue advance testing, this week.”

If the doctor says “We only test for conditions that we can fix.”
Yes, that was once said to your cat faerie. Her comeback was:
“Well, I enjoy hunting for treatments and resources, I love turning over rocks and seeing what’s under them. So let’s go ahead and run the test, see some numbers, and I can do some research. Even if I come up with nothing at least we tried. I am paying for the test after all.”

The doctor does not know about alternative therapies, or thinks they are weird or don’t work.
We saved the toughest for last. Doctors paid a premium for their training and it’s very dear to them. So anything that wasn’t in their curriculum is often mysterious, threatening, and viewed as weird, not effective, or maybe even dangerous. They could have had instructors who warned them that alternative treatments are bad.

“I know that __________ isn’t your thing, but I’ve read good things about it, and I have a friend who used ___________________ and it worked out really well. Would you consider:

  • Reading this book
  • Reading this website or forum
  • Reading this report
  • Calling this clinic/specialist (provide name and phone number, or email) for some advice
  • Transfer a copy of my/my cat’s file to a practitioner that I found so they can review the history. I’ll have you copied on results.

If you seek the advice of another doctor or specialist, keep your vet in the loop by forwarding test results, treatment and progress for the file. If you doctor or vet knows you’ve sought out other directions, but kept him/her informed they won’t feel slighted, and everyone will benefit. It’s very possible that your doctor/vet will be impressed and learn a new modality. We’ve seen this happen first hand! We let a very skeptical, eye rolling veterinarian sit in on a session with an animal chiropractor. He was so impressed that not only did he study veterinary chiropractic he went on to become an instructor!

We often get emails from people who say: “My vet is really great. I wish I could find an MD as wonderful of my vet!” Cat Faeries is always here to help your cat AND you. Your cat faerie recently stuck gold here when she found her new MD from this list. You can search by state for doctors who are hip to diet + health which is hard to find: http://lowcarbdoctors.blogspot.com

Coming soon! Food allergy testing for cats and dogs! It’s easy! It’s effective and affordable.

Cats often need baby food, learn which is using GMO’s!

From time to time your vet will recommend that your cat be fed baby food for a period of time. Usually the cat has been sick and is vulnerable to toxins and stresses to the body.

Gerber is using GMO ingredients, and ingredients doused with the herbicide Roundup. If these ingredients harm babies they are likely to harm our cats.

Our sources tell us that Beechnut is not using GMO’s or ingredients which have had Roundup (or similar) applied to them. At this time Beechnut would be the ideal choice for any cat who is sick or being fussy.

One of the many reasons to avoid feeding cats GMO food is that these modified foods have shown to compromise kidneys. I don’t think we need to point out that renal failure is a common occurrence in cats. It’s something we cat lovers try to prevent. GMO’s also harm the liver.

Note: Both brands removed onion powder from their foods a long time ago in response to mothers protesting that if it’s bad for cats, it would be bad for babies.

CALL Gerber and give them an earful. Available 24/7: 800-284-9488

Here is a really good article about GMO’s and why they are so bad:

http://melisann.hubpages.com/hub/What-Genetically-Modified-Foods-Do-to-Our-Bodies

A Story in Pictures About Shelter Cats

 
 

Here are the top 5 most common names for cats

Here are the top 5 most common names for cats (provided by a pet insurance company):

1. Max
2. Lucy
3. Smokey
4. Shadow
5. Charlie

And from the same pet insurance company these names were the most unique:

Purrsia
Stevie Thunder
Princess Lollipop
Catmandue
Lady Marmalade
Peter the Great
Halley Beri Flufferton lll
Candy Corn

Feral cat saves woman from depths of depression and homelessness

You are going to need a box of Kleenex for this story. In 2000 electrician Roza Katovitch suddenly lost her fiance to a heart aneurysm. Three days later her father died. This sent Roza into a tailspin which led to depression and eventually homelessness because she was not emotionally able to work.

Every day she would go to the cemetery where both men are buried to tend to their graves. And she would be there all day long. She got to know the animals who came around. There were skunks, birds, raccoons and of course, feral cats. Carolyn Jones staff writer for the San Francisco Chronicle will tell you the rest of Roza’s story in this article which ends well for Roza and Miss Tuxedo the cat, with great photos.

And yes, we noticed that her last name is KATovitch! Cats must be her destiny!

San Francisco Chronicle – Homeless woman and cat who met in cemetery save each other

Toxoplasmosis, cats and pregnant women. Is your doctor giving you bad advice?

We cringe every time we hear that another cat has lost a home because of bad and incorrect warnings from doctors directed at pregnant women.

We finally found a really good article that clears the air about cats, toxoplasmosis and pregnant or nursing women.

Far too many obstetricians attempting to sound smart have given women bad and very wrong advice: “Get rid of your cat to protect your child.”

If your cat stays inside and has never eaten a rodent the chances of your cat carrying this parasite are remote. Concerned about your cat? Have the cat tested!

From the article we’ve linked to below:

Question: Do I have to give up my cat if I’m pregnant or planning on becoming pregnant?

Answer: No. You should follow these helpful tips to reduce your risk of environmental exposure to Toxoplasma.

  • Avoid changing cat litter if possible. If no one else can perform the task, wear disposable gloves and wash your hands with soap and warm water afterwards.
  • Ensure that the cat litter box is changed daily. The Toxoplasma parasite does not become infectious until 1 to 5 days after it is shed in a cat’s feces.
  • Feed your cat commercial dry or canned food, not raw or undercooked meats.
  • Keep cats indoors.
  • Avoid stray cats, especially kittens. Do not get a new cat while you are pregnant.
  • Keep outdoor sandboxes covered.
  • Wear gloves when gardening and during contact with soil or sand because it might be contaminated with cat feces that contain Toxoplasma. Wash hands with soap and warm water after gardening or contact with soil or sand.

Read the entire article: http://www.cdc.gov/parasites/toxoplasmosis/gen_info/pregnant.html

The ASPCA has a good page about Toxoplasmosis and cats. Here’s something they say:

If you suspect your cat is carrying the parasite that causes toxoplasmosis, it’s time to get him tested by your veterinarian. If he tests positive, it means he has been exposed to the disease but is unlikely to be shedding oocysts after an initial two-week period. If he tests negative, it means he has not been exposed and could still become infected and shed oocysts — but again only for two weeks.

Read more from the ASPCA: http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/cat-care/toxoplasmosis

From a new mother’s forum, moms and a vet student speak:

http://www.babycenter.com/400_chances-of-toxoplasmosis-with-an-indoor-cat_1505321_868.bc