Why Sprouts Are Good for Cats: Make healthful Kitty Spaghetti from red clover seeds

We’ve always been fans of wheat grass for cats, having written what could have been the first article ever on the benefits of wheat grass for cats in Tiger Tribe magazine back in 1993.

Yaelle is a Cat Faeries customer and for over 20 years she’s made what she calls Kitty Spaghetti or Cat Salad from sprouted red clover seeds. She has tended to countless cats from her own, as well as ferals and fosters. A true cat whisperer! Here’s what she has to say about red clover sprouts.


Yaelle’s Healthy “Cat Salad” or “Kitty Spaghetti”

This is my simple “cat salad/kitty spaghetti” recipe that I feed my cats, to all my rescues/fosters, too. In over 20 years only 3 cats have refused this delicious and nutritious dish. Kitties gobble this up faster than I’ve seen cats eat any other kind of food.

What you need:

  • red clover seeds
  • A clean 1 quart Mason jar
  • Something mesh like: panty hose, cheese cloth.
  • A rubber band
  • Filtered water
  • Alternatively you could be a special sprouting jar at your local health food store, but truly a Mason jar is just as good and it’s practically free!

HERE’S A BASIC HOW-TO-SPROUT RECIPE:
1: Take red clover seeds and put them in your clean quart-sized jar. For one or two cats: 1 to 2 tablespoons. For more cats and yourself add 4 to 6 tablespoons of seeds.

2: Add purified or filtered water enough that the water is several inches above the seeds. The seeds will expand, so make sure you have enough water covering them.

3: Soak overnight.

4: In the morning pour off water. Then add more water through the pantyhose or cheesecloth and rinse the seeds well. Do this a couple of times. Once you’ve done your final rinse place mouth of jar down at 45 degree angle for drainage and ventilation. There are several ways you can tilt the jars at a 45 degree angle. You can use a dish drainer or prop the jar up at the correct angle with dish towels and something to lean the jar against.

5: Rinse twice a day with fresh cool water.

6: After 4 or 5 days you’ve got mature sprouts. Don’t let them go longer, they’ll get bigger and tough. It’s now time to start using them. Your sprouts are fresh for almost one week stored in a glass jar in the fridge.

Once you get the hang of this you can keep a jar or two in rotation so that you don’t run out of sprouts. It’s a bit tricky at first to get the rhythm down, and for a long time I found that either I had too many sprouts or I was running out. Eventually with practice, you develop a system that works optimally for you, your cats and your schedule. This delicate sprouting process doesn’t have to be a perfect science. Even if the sprouts are not fully grown, as long as they have sprouted, they are a “living food” and what’s essential for this healthful recipe!

I have 3 quart-sized glass jars “going” at all times:

  • One jar has seeds that are soaking. I soak my seeds about every 3 or 4 days.
  • The 2nd jar has sprouts that are in the growing stage.
  • The 3rd jar has the sprouts that are ready to harvest.

Time to add sprouts to your cat’s food!

After your sprouts are ready, you take your preferred moist cat food. I recommend Primal Freeze-Dried Formula for Cats It comes in little “bricks” or nuggets. It’s frozen 100% human-grade raw organic food full of wonderful things such as coconut oil. It’s a bit expensive but worth it if you can afford it.

Here’s where to find this cat food: http://www.primalpetfoods.com/locator/index.php

(Cat Faeries recommends the turkey flavor as we do not trust fish from any source at this time. This is what we feed our own cats, and only the turkey flavor.)

Put the cat’s food in a bowl and add sprouts, mixing with a fork. You might give the sprouts a rough chop first.

In addition you could add a little cod liver oil for skin and fur. It has lots of vitamin A and D and tastes fishy so cats really go for it! Kitties (and humans) really need their healthy fats.

Finally, to “spice” things up, I always sprinkle some spirulina into my cat salad/kitty spaghetti.

I only have known 3 cats who would not eat the “cat salad/kitty spaghetti” from the very first serving. For those cats you could add a few of your kitty’s favorite and healthful kibble just like “meatballs” on top of spaghetti or salad “croutons”!

BON APPETIT

With all my love,
Yaelle


Here’s a picture of Yaelle’s Cassie…

102 year old lady proves you’re never too old to adopt a cat

102-year-old Iona L. and 2-year-old Edward at the Montgomery County Animal Shelter

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/01/22/102-year-old-woman-adopts-cat_n_6524804.html – This Photo Captures The Tender Moment A 102-Year-Old Woman Fell In Love With A Shelter Cat

Do you ever feel like you are too old to do something? Often that’s so not the case especially in matters of love! Here you will read about a lady who’s 102 years on this planet and she’s fallen in love with a special cat – and it’s mutual. Neither are concerned with how long the other might be around – they just went for it and it’s beautiful. We love that old saying “it’s never too late.” This woman and her cat prove that it’s true. There’s nothing like the love of a furry friend to make one feel young, vital and needed.

Meet a Roman Cat!

Mimi sent us this picture of Aka…

“This is Aka, my beautiful almost 15 year old Roman cat. She is the Queen of Piazza Mazzini here in Rome, which she watches over from our 5th floor balcony. She is on her window perch; outside the window in the background you can see the top of St. Peter’s dome. She is quite a lady and doesn’t have a wrinkle on her. She loves relaxing on her favorite armchair or gazing out the window, looking at the streets of Rome. We met when she was 5 days old and left her mom to waddle over to my hand. 2 months later she moved in with us. She’s my gattissima bellissima!!!”

We wrote her…

“We are located in San Francisco and there is an organization here called Friends of Roman Cats – they raise money for Italian cat shelters and rescue! One of the groups is called Torre Argentina. They have an annual fund raiser here which we’ve donated to in the past.”

“I’ve had many interactions with Italian cats! My favorite, the funniest: I was in Verona (one of my favorite places) and walked past an alley. There were a lot of street cats eating. I looked up and sitting in a window about 4 floors up was a woman, something right out of Fellini… Harsh looking face with garish makeup, buxom figure, sleeveless dress with bra straps hanging down, a cigarette dangling from her lips, throwing pieces of fish out of her window the cats below. I watched for awhile. Then she saw me and threw fish at me and yelled something in Italian at me. Pretty funny! I once helped the old ladies feed the cats who live on the grounds of a museum in Milano.”

“Thank you so much, it gave me a few minutes to think of the cats I saw and met in Italy!”

Mimi wrote back…

“Thanks so much for the interesting information on the “Friends of Roman Cats”. Everyone here knows the cats of Torre Argentina. They are very famous and inhabit some very important architectural digs. In fact they have recently “discovered” or “uncovered” the exact location where Julius Caesar was assassinated there. I work near an area that is a crossroads between the Aventine hill, Testaccio and the Pyramid and there is a colony of cats there too. In fact many cats (lovely black ones) live in the garden/parking lot of the pool/Gym where I work. They are well cared for by the volunteers from the Piramide cat colony.”

If you ever come to Rome, I’ll take you to visit the Piramide cat colony!!! I’ll look forward to seeing Aka in an upcoming newsletter.

Thanks and baci.
Mimi

Advice for long car trips with cats

This is a question and answer email exchange that we recently had with a customer. We thought we’d share it with you in the event that you might need to travel or move with cats in a car.

Teri Our Customer: You’ve been so very helpful to me and how to care for litter box problems, etc. – so I am turning to you again for some assistance. I am preparing to move and I would like to get a plan for my three cats. We will need to be in a car for 8 hours. I’m trying to get a plan in my mind so I can get supplies needed within the next several months. I need to budget for this. Would appreciate your kind suggestions and helpful hints to make this trip as easy as possible for my cats and myself.

Cat Faeries: Congratulations on a big move! Will you be the only adult human in the car? If so, when you stop to pee or eat you must keep your eye on the car at all times – we’ve heard tragic stories of cars and campers being stolen with cats inside! Be cautious at rest stops and gas stations. Cars and campers have even been stolen in parking lots with meters. If you are with another adult, one of you should remain in the car or stand outside of it while the other runs the errand.

Teri: I’ll probably be alone. What should I do when I need to use the facilities?

Cat Faeries: Check this out! http://www.go-girl.com/ We know someone who has one (she’s MAJOR phobic about public toilets) and she likes it. She sort of enjoys telling people she can pee while standing! You’ll want to practice in advance as it takes a bit of getting used to.

Teri: I have good size kennel/carriers for each cat and I saw that you have pads.

Cat Faeries: The waterproof pads are great. Pre wash them to soften them up a bit (they’ll absorb better). Double them up so that if the top layer is soiled you can quickly remove it and there’s a clean layer below. However, even if the pad has been urinated on, it should dry, and you may find that leaving the cats undisturbed in the carrier/kennels is best for all of you. The pads can be quickly and easily folded to fit inside the carrier/kennel.

Teri: Would I use the Feliway to spray my car and in the kennels?

Cat Faeries: Yes, that would be ideal. You’d spray the pads 15 minutes before you place the pads and the cats in the carriers/kennels. Give each pad 4 squirts. After a few hours, when you stop the car to freshen up you can spray it in the air towards where the cats are kenneled.

Teri: I am concerned with their peeing, etc. due to the long hours traveling.

Cat Faeries: They will pee at some point, and they may poop, although they may hold that one. Invest in a smallish litter box for each carrier/kennel. You don’t need to put as much litter in them as you do at home. We don’t want to see soiled cat litter flying around the car if you need to brake hard and fast!

Lastly, music is really important because the right music can be very calming to you and the cats. We recommend avoiding talk radio, rap, 80’s metal, and loud banging anything. If your vehicle doesn’t have a CD player or if you don’t have something like an iPod – sing! Even if you sound like a flock of crows, sing anyway. It will keep you awake and alert, and the cats will enjoy hearing your voice. Can’t remember the lyrics? Go through the alphabet and sing the name a vegetable for each letter (A = asparagus, B = broccoli etc). It’s a fun thing to do during any mundane task, like doing dishes. After you’ve done vegetables come up with old fashioned people names which you think would be cool for a cat and sing those!

Drive carefully, and let us know when you’ve arrived in your new home!

Newton’s Purr-spective – When grooming gets out of control

One of the most frustrating feline medical conditions is when our cats over groom, or self-barber. This means they are licking or biting at their fur until bald spots form, and in severe cases bleeding. We’ve tried, and failed at, creating a flower essence formula that would work for all cats who do this. Veterinarians give out drugs but from what customers tell us, they don’t work and in some cases can make it worse. And most people don’t like giving their cats drugs like this, which we understand completely.

We once had a bunny who did this. It was when we gave her less freedom and confined her to her cage more than letting her roam with the other rabbits, she stopped barbering and her fur started to grow back. I’ve never forgotten that and wondered how something like this could help cats.

Recently we received a photo from someone who wanted us to post her cat to Facebook and Pinterest. The cat was wearing a shirt and the person who submitted it said the cat wears it to help with his anxiety.

From Kelly: “This is Roger. You will usually find him wearing some sort of shirt every day. It helps him a little bit with his anxiety issues. Roger found me when he was about a year old. He was living in my neighbor’s back yard. He is now almost 9 years old.”

We assumed that the snugness of made the cat feel secure much like Holly the bunny felt so secure being in her cage rather than being free ranging and thus the self-barbering could stop.

Snugness. There are therapies for children and adults with blankets and hugging that help a variety of emotional conditions, so why not a sweater or a jacket for a cat!

This was such a fascinating theory and solution that we asked our feline friend Newton (who knows everything) to investigate. And this is what he discovered – including a jacket that you can purchase for a cat who’s going overboard with grooming.



Fellow cats: Have you ever heard your person say, “I was so upset I was pulling my hair out”? Hmmm. It sounds rather painful and I can’t imagine it would solve any problems. But people do say strange things when they are angry or stressed. Although we don’t have the pressure of bringing home a paycheck cats get stressed too. By nature we are curious and enjoy intellectual stimulation, but we do value the comfort of basic routines in our daily lives. Change that persists longer than a visit to the vet can really upset our emotional balance.

Examples of stressful situations range from a change in kitty litter to moving across country. A new addition to the family (animal or person) or loss of a beloved companion also increase stress and anxiety.

When we are kittens our birth mom licks and cleans us and makes us feel safe. As adults we find our daily cleaning ritual soothing. It stands to reason that under stress we would groom ourselves to ease anxiety. Unfortunately, too much of a good thing can lead to hair loss as the follicles break. Licking the unprotected skin can then cause sores and infections. Since licking is our natural response to heal a wound a vicious circle starts and continues until the stress is alleviated. http://cats.about.com/od/behaviortraining/a/catover-grooming.htm

The pet parent is generally unaware of the damage Fluffy is doing to herself until it is painfully obvious. Stressed cats often hide and do their excessive grooming in private. This is one reason to do regular exams on all your cats to detect problems in their early stages. What should be done if hair loss is discovered?

1. Rule out potential health issues such as skin diseases, parasites or allergies.

2. Determine the source of the stress.

3. Modify the environment to reduce or eliminate the stress.

Well known stress relievers include Feliway® http://www.catfaeries.com/feliway.html, flower essences http://www.catfaeries.com/essences.html, calming music http://www.catfaeries.com/music-for-cats.html, and environmental enrichment.

Another nonpharmaceutical therapy (for animals and people) now widely used is touch. Here are some examples I’ve been reading about.

The Tellington TTouch® has been helping animals and people with anxiety since it was developed in the 1970’s. http://www.ttouch.com/whatisTTouch.shtml

The centuries old practice of wrapping fussy infants in swaddling cloths is still practiced today. Some say the pressure simulates the comfort of being safe in the womb.

Pressure and weighted vests help relieve anxiety in autistic people.

The ThundershirtTM, now available for dogs and cats, exerts gentle pressure to the torso to relieve anxiety. The exact therapeutic mechanism is currently unknown. However, good results have been achieved. http://www.thundershirt.com/Product/ThundershirtForCats.aspx?item_guid=04a62476-dd84-4c67-ae9b-83f2fb67db81

“Wait a minute”, you say. “A shirt on my cat? I’ve been dressing Tiger up as an elf for holiday photos for years and he is definitely NOT relaxed and smiling.”

True, the idea of using pressure to calm cats is relatively new. Many veterinary clinics use a technique called the “kitty burrito”. A nervous cat is firmly wrapped in a towel for examination of a small exposed part. Clothing a cat would wear on a frequent or daily basis is harder to imagine. Actually, the term “shirt” is a bit misleading. The ThundershirtTM looks more like a thin lifevest.

Cats are more sensitive to touch than dogs. The first time wearing the shirt they may freeze or even lie still on their sides. As with any new thing Fluffy needs a gradual period of adjustment to different sensations.

No single method is guaranteed and you may find that a combination is required. Patience and experimentation with the examples I’ve given will help you to discover what works best to reduce Fluffy’s anxiety and restore her fur coat.

How rare are female orange tabbies? Quite! Let’s meet one!

Dear Friends,

Thank you for another amazing year. Would you believe that in just a few months we will celebrate 22 years since Cat Faeries was created? It’s true!

During this past year we heard from hundreds upon hundreds of amazing people who told us about their amazing cats. Your kind words and stories mean the world to us – truly. So many of your messages to us moved us to tears, sometimes joyful tears, and sometimes very sad tears – but we welcome them all because feelings are beautiful and are to be cherished.

As we say good-bye to December which was Cat Faeries “white cat month” we also bid adieu to 2014. To welcome 2015 we proclaim January is Orange Cat Month!

Send us photos and stories about your orange cats, your marmalade cats, those creamsicle beauties to catfaeries@catfaeries.com – put the words Orange Cat in the subject line and we’ll start posting their orangey selves to Pinterest, Facebook, Instagram and Twitter and in our January newsletters.

This week we heard from Mary Jo who ordered a cat bed from us right before Christmas. She wanted us to see how stunning her orange tabby, Velveeta is resting in her Cat Faeries bed. That’s when we learned that Velveeta is a female tabby which is quite rare. We’ll tell you more about that after we tell you Velveeta’s story:

 

“Velveeta is eight years old. I adopted her from local no-kill shelter, Crash’s Landing, here in Grand Rapids, MI. They think she was about two years old when they found her in 2008. She was adopted once but returned after several months because she didn’t acquiesce to the diva cat already in residence. Crash’s Landing will take back any cat they adopt out – no questions asked.

She followed me all around the shelter when I went to visit Crash’s (third step in their adoption process) in April 2012. My adoption counselor said “She has never done that!”

In her bio it said that she needed to be the only cat and preferably the only pet – which was perfect for me! I had dogs my entire adult life, but now I’m no longer able to care for a dog. Needing a more independent pet I thought the right cat would be better for me. Was that ever the truth – and I found the most perfect cat in Velveeta! We made a pact the day I brought her home: now living with another diva, she’s the princess because I’m the queen.

In the almost three years since we have both worked very hard on our relationship, getting to know and accept (tolerate?) each other’s habits, likes and dislikes. She has learned I don’t like even play-biting, or gentle nipping, and I have learned that hair balls are part of the natural processes; sometimes I have to hunt them down, other times they’re presented, almost gift-like.

She has the sweetest most patient temperament. She’s very loving, more so as time goes on. I hope she knows she will live here forever. For now I believe she knows that she is safe and very loved.

I suspect she knows that her hair blends with the color of the inside plush fleece lining, and the outer color matches her gorgeous green eyes. Of course it’s all about her! And we wouldn’t have it any other way. Thanks Cat Faeries!“

 

 

This is Velveeta in her new Cat Faeries bed.

This is Velveeta waiting for her new bed to arrive!

Here’s a great article about female orange cats written by a long time Cat Faeries friend: JaneA Kelly. JaneA is a very good writer so this piece is a lively mix of science and genetics, with a big pinch of humor, and some cute photos all of which are guaranteed to both educate and amuse you. And yes, that’s her name! Cool, isn’t it?

http://www.paws-and-effect.com/are-orange-female-cats-really-that-rare/

Thorn L. who is another favorite customer and friend of Cat Faeries volunteers at cat shelters wherever she goes, and she tells us: “I had an angel of a perfect orange tabby girl in my feral colony before I left Charlotte. When I took her to the vet, it was as if I’d brought some kind of princess or prophet in! Needless to say, she was adopted immediately.” Thorn is yet another cool name for a Cat Faeries human friend!

Happy New Year!

Happy Orange Cat Month!