Cat Faeries’ Eleven Commandments for Living with Cats

Cats really and truly want nothing more than to be loved. They want our approval and acceptance. They want us to care for them as if they are the most precious thing in our lives. Cats are highly sensitive and emotional. When they are upset or scared, or annoyed, they let us know in many ways including peeing on something. They just don’t know that this action completely freaks a person out and for good reason, the smell is horrible, and there is the worry that it was happen again and again.

We bumped into this “A Cat’s Ten Commandments” on Facebook. It’s good but we wanted to put our own spin and viewpoint on it. We hope you like it. Share it far and wide if you do like it.

Cat Faeries’ Eleven Commandments for Living with Cats

  1. My life time here on Earth will be anywhere from 8 years to over 22 years. During that time I need you to love me and care for me as best you can.
  2. Be patient with me and understand that I am an animal who is trying to live in a home. I’m trying to be well behaved. I am not a child with the perspective of a human. While my brain might be like that of a 3 or 4 year child I have the instincts and temperament of a feline. I may do things that you do not understand, but please try to. I’m my own species.
  3. Should you lose your temper with me and yell at me, hit me, kick me or throw me remember that your brain is much bigger than mine, that you weigh at least 15 times more than I do, and that you have the ability to rationalize and forgive what I did. You can walk away or calmly address it. You can open your mind and heart to see that I am different from you…
  4. I need the respect of all who enter our home, no matter their age, personality, or status. I need the respect of all who dwell in our home – without exception. They don’t have to love me, but to accept me and be kind to me at all times. Do not allow any form of abuse in our home, ever.
  5. Do not abandon me. Do not dump me on the streets or in a shelter. Do not choose me over a baby or boyfriend/husband/girlfriend/wife. I am family. I am part of your family. I add enrichment to our family.
  6. I will grow old, frail, and weak – as will you. Would you like it if someone “got rid of” you? Promise me you’ll erase the phrase “got rid of” from your vocabulary about me and other animals.
  7. Pay attention to me. Pet me, but not too much – know when I’ve had too much. Keep my nails trim, my fur brushed, my teeth looked at by a veterinarian.
  8. Food is everything to a cat. We may not be rich but please buy me or make me the best food that you can. Do not buy cheap lifeless food because it’s cheap. Do your best. Food is both my pleasure and sustenance.
  9. If you must leave me to spend hours away from home hunting for those green pieces of paper that buy cat food and pay bills, know that I worry about you. You could be pounced on by a bigger animal while you are out hunting. If your hunt means you are gone for a few days please have a kind person come to feed me and talk to me in your absence. It will help my delicate nerves and ultimately my health and well-being.
  10. Provide for me some great toys, warm soft places to sleep, and as much quiet and peace as you can create in our home. Remember, if our home is healthful and safe for me that it is healthful and safe for you too.
  11. The time will come when my body gives out and it’s time for me to go, to cross The Rainbow Bridge. Please be with me up until the end. Stroke my fur. Talk to me. Remind me of our good times together. Remind me of our love for each other. Tell me that you look forward to seeing me again when your time comes. I loved you with all of my heart.
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Hyperthyroidism and Your Cat

Newton’s Purrspective – Hyperthyroidism

Hyperthyroidism is a common disease in older cats ( > 10 years). Enlarged thyroid glands produce too much hormone (T3 and T4) causing a metabolic imbalance which leads to severe health issues if untreated. Cornell Feline Health Center – Hyperthyroidism in Cats

Symptoms often include:

  • Increased appetite
  • Weight loss
  • Increased water consumption and urination


Isaac Newton

 

Thyroid hormones affect nearly all the organs so these secondary problems are common:

  • Increased heart rate
  • Enlargement of the heart (and heart disease)
  • Increased blood pressure
  • Kidney disease (due to the kidneys working overtime as the blood rapidly circulates)

Diagnosis involves feeling Kitty’s throat for enlargement of the thyroid glands and a blood test for thyroid hormone levels. (Please note these symptoms could also indicate diabetes or other problems. That is why the bloodwork is so important.)

The good news is that hyperthyroid disease responds well to current medications. Medications – easier said than done, right? Compounding pharmacies now make tastier pills and chewables. A gel that is applied to the inside of Kitty’s ear has been a lifesaver for cats that hate ALL oral medications (you know who you are).

The two alternative treatments are:

  • Removal of the thyroid glands (which carries a surgical risk)
  • Treatment with radioactive iodine to destroy the abnormal tissue

The latter is quite safe and effective, but may be out of range in most cat lovers’ budgets.

Now that you know the basics about hyperthyroidism symptoms and treatments you are probably wondering how cats get it in the first place. We know that the incidence of feline thyroid disease has increased in the last 30 years. This is likely a combination of awareness and of increased longevity in general. Remember this is a disease of older cats. But can a direct cause be determined? Is it genetic? Is it environmental?

Some researchers are looking at environmental toxins that may also be incorporated into cat foods. Research is just starting to be published. http://www.chicagonow.com/steve-dales-pet-world/2016/01/could-some-cat-food-be-causing-hyperthyroid-disease/ One study found chemicals known to potentially harm humans in certain fish based cat foods. However, to date there is no demonstrated link to feline hyperthyroidism. Additional research is clearly needed.

Environmental toxins are a concern for all of us. You may remember the classic “Silent Spring” which led to banning the poison DDT. A less familiar book “Our Stolen Future” describes how chemicals can mimic hormones in the body. When we discover what causes hyperthyroidism in cats we will also better understand thyroid issues in other species, including humans. Until then our best defense is a good offense.

All cats should have regular checkups. If Kitty has any of the symptoms listed above please see your vet as soon as possible. Catching and treating thyroid problems early can minimize the damage to other organs.

 
 

How coconut oil will help your cat’s health.

If you are using coconut oil for your health and cooking then you know already know about many of its benefits for people. You’ll be happy to know that your cat will benefit from coconut oil too.

Among the reasons to add ½ to 1 teaspoon to your cat’s food every day:

  • Coconut oil provides the much needed “medium chain fatty acids.”
  • It is 90% saturated fat which is vital for brain health and can stave off dementia and Alzheimer’s
  • Boosts the immune system.
  • Coconut oil is about 40% lauric acid which has been shown to be a preventative of some cancers.
  • Improved digestion, say goodbye to constipation and finding hard cats poops on the floor.
  • Improves thyroid function
  • Antimicrobial
  • Anti bacterial
  • Anti fungal
  • Full of antioxidants
  • Helps prevent the parasite: Giardia
  • Helps the cat absorb more minerals and other nutrients from food.
  • Has been found to fight staph infection better than antibiotics.
  • Immune system boosting.
  • Prevents fur balls
  • Clear up rashes by applying it directly.
  • Heal wounds fast by applying it directly.

Adding coconut oil to cat food:

It’s easy to mix ½ to 1 teaspoon in canned cat food or homemade cat food. Start with a small amount and work up to ½ to 1 teaspoon per day. If you live in a hot climate your coconut oil is probably liquefied so spooning it out is easy. If your climate or house is cool to cold it will be solid – in that case spoon it out, put in a bowl and with your spoon press to soften, then add the food and mix. If you feed crunchies/kibble do your best to mix the two together. Most cats like the taste of coconut oil – we even have a video for you at the end of this newsletter with a cat eating coconut from the shell!

People: improve you oral health and detoxify

The humans at Cat Faeries are big users of coconut oil and in particular we love the Ayurvedic therapy of “oil pulling” or “oil swishing” for our mouths. The oil “pulls” toxins which are spat out after 15 minutes of swishing. Tartar melts away before it can harden which means better gum health and fewer trips to the dentist. It is said that medical conditions such as diabetes improve. Floss first, then swish – we can almost guarantee that a few sneaky food particles hid and will be dislodged by the oil – surprise! Daily swishing means your teeth will be whiter, your gums stronger, and your breath will be fresher. Your mouth will feel sparkling clean for hours after.

Alas, cats can’t swish oil in their mouths, but because you add it to their food they will be happy with improved digestion and to have fur worthy of flaunting! Not to mention your cat is going to feel healthier, younger, and have more bounce to their pounce – the oil will improve their joints!

Here’s one of many articles on coconut oil for swishing.

http://www.saragottfriedmd.com/oil-pulling-whiten-your-teeth-detoxify-your-body-and-prevent-cavities/

Here’s a great article about medium chain fatty acids:

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2010/10/22/coconut-oil-and-saturated-fats-can-make-you-healthy.aspx

When Should Your Cat See an Eye Doctor?

A cat’s eyes view the world with razor sharp detail and precision, and generally a healthy cat will have good vision for all 9 lives. But things can cause loss of vision and it’s best to know what can go wrong, how it can go wrong, and where to seek out the best help. A veterinary eye specialist who has extra diagnostic skills would be your cat’s new best friend.

Cat Faeries trusty feline friend Newton gives us the cat’s eye view of feline vision health, and the medical conditions which can affect it.


Newton’s Purrspective – When Should Your Cat See an Eye Doctor?

Have you ever taken your cat to an eye doctor?

Most people assume cats have nearly perfect vision. In reality their visual acuity is in the range of 20/100 to 20/200. This means that what a cat can see at 20 feet a person can see at 100-200 feet. Of course, we do excel at night vision, needing only 1/6 the amount of light a human would need. http://www.businessinsider.com/pictures-of-how-cats-see-the-world-2013-10 Being nearsighted is no handicap for us at all. The real problem is the eye diseases cats get, some of which can lead to permanent blindness.


Isaac Newton

The most frequently diagnosed ailment is conjunctivitis, an inflammation of the mucous membranes around the eye. It is highly contagious, but curable if treated promptly. Your veterinarian may prescribe antibiotic eye drops or ointment. In addition, you may wish to supplement this with a holistic remedy such as Colloidal Defense, which has many immune system benefits beyond helping eyes heal. Cats also need a calm environment to recover from any illness and to remain healthy. I have four feline siblings and I don’t know what we would do without Convivial Housecat and the Ball of Twine CD. (People enjoy this music too!)

More serious eye conditions include:

An ocular discharge or pawing at the eye are clear signs that professional help is needed as soon as possible. A scratched cornea from rough play is very painful! However, some problems have no obvious symptoms and can only be diagnosed with special instruments such as an ophthalmoscope. When Kitty has an exam your vet will evaluate both eye condition and overall health. (An eye problem can be related to other health issues.) You may then be referred to a veterinary ophthalmologist for additional diagnostics and care.

Cataracts are visible as a cloudiness in the center of the eye. Left untreated they can lead to glaucoma. http://www.veterinaryeyeinstitute.com/cataract-surgery/

Symptoms of glaucoma include pain and swelling of the eyeball. Blindness occurs rapidly if the pressure inside the eye is not reduced. Medications to relieve pain and reduce pressure will be prescribed, but in some cases surgery may be needed. http://www.vcahospitals.com/main/pet-health-information/article/animal-health/glaucoma-in-cats/3938

Uveitis has variable symptoms including squinting, light sensitivity, tearing and discoloration of the eye. http://animaleyecare.net/diseases/uveitis/ The cause, though often difficult to determine, is usually trauma, infection or cancer. The chosen treatment will depend on the probable cause. If glaucoma is also present this MUST be treated as well. Immune system support is vital. (Colloidal Defense helps support the immune system.)

Melanomas are the most common eye tumors in cats. Usually areas of increased pigmentation are visible. However, please note that not all increased pigmentation is pathological – discoloration is often benign. My sister, Tommy Lee Jones, has “iris freckles” in one eye. Don’t take chances with your cat’s eyes. Only a trained professional can make a diagnosis. http://veterinaryvision.com/for-veterinarians/clinical-forum/specific-disease-topics/feline-ophthalmology/

The most common diseases leading to blindness are:

  • uveitis (may be associated with infection or trauma)
  • retinal detachment (often associated with high blood pressure due to hyperthyroidism)
  • trauma (provide a safe environment and trim toenails to decrease risk)

http://www.vet.cornell.edu/fhc/health_information/vision.cfm

An eye exam should be part of your cat’s regular veterinary checkup, as well as blood tests for hyperthyroidism in senior cats. However, if you suspect any problems with your cat’s eyes please seek professional help as soon as possible. Prompt treatment may save Kitty’s sight.

Feline longevity, a long life for your cat.

Everyone wants to live a long and happy life, and your cat is no exception. Cat Faeries is devoted to making the lives of cats healthful, while providing solutions for good behavior. Here are our picks for feline life extension!

Kidney Kitty Flower Essence Formula For Cats
Starting when your cat is young, or really starting at any age because it’s never too late: a few drops in the water bowl every day supports kidney function. We’ve heard from many customers who said that when they ran out they saw a negative difference in their cat. Once they started again the cat rallied!

Here’s a recent quote from a customer…

Pita is almost 15 now. A few weeks ago he was displaying signs of kidney problems – lethargic, lack of appetite, his coat was getting nappy. I upped his daily dose of Kidney Kitty, and I was amazed – he bounced back to his normal self within 3 days!!! Thank you Cat Faeries!

Pam – January, 2015

Elder Support Flower Essence Formula For Cats
At the first sign of age start with this one in the water bowl or mixed into food. Supports joints, the brain, and the thyroid.
Mood Music for Cats (and cat lovers): A Ball of Twine, a CD of calming music
We can’t emphasize enough how soothing sounds and serenity kick illnesses to the curb, extend life, lower blood pressure, lower blood sugar, and so much more. We love this CD. It’s not new agey, these are original compositions which remind us a bit of lullabies. It’s very pretty music. There’s a sound clip at the link – hold your cat while you play it and see the reaction!
Comfort Zone with Feliway – Diffuser Plug-Ins
Even if your cats are perfect with their litter boxes and don’t fight the calming scent of this pheromone will keep them calm. Calm cats = cats who’ll age very well and gracefully. Place one in any room where your cats spend most of their time. Each refill bottle lasts 4 weeks. This is a great investment in your cat’s health and future.

Toys! Toys! Toys! And more Toys!
A lot of human fitness experts have stopped using words like “work” out, rather they are calling exercise “play.” And play is something we like to do no matter our age, cats included. Running, leaping, chasing, stalking, pouncing keeps your cat young with limber joints and a trim body. Our toys are American made. The catnip inside is ethically wildcrafted with the highest level of nepetalactone of any catnip on the planet (yes, it’s been tested!). The unique shapes, fabrics, and sizes appeal to cats of all ages, and the adorableness appeals to people.

Sleep my pretties, sleep! (in a Faerie Cat Bed!)

Our cat beds are American made in a small factory in California by workers who are paid a living wage and are treated very well. And they are pretty! And soft. Our beds do not have that toxic foam on the sides. Who wants toxins! Besides, those beds can’t be washed, and your cat can’t bend or position the sides to be comfy and cozy. Our beds wash beautifully and they are attractive to your cat and will look great in your home.

And, Green Cat Beds Are On Sale!

Cats eat 15% more food in Winter

We people know that chilly weather makes us hungry for more food. This time of year we begin to crave roasted vegetables and meats, and we hunt for new recipes for stews and soups. Hot food warms our bones and hearts!

Often we don’t realize that our cats respond to weather changes like we do. During Summer while we are eating salad our carnivore friends might leave food behind in the bowl. But in Winter the bowl is licked clean and they meow for more.

How much more? A study that we found told us that in Winter cats will eat about 15% more food than during the rest of the year.

Be a rock star Feline Chef and don’t grab food for your cat from the fridge and serve it cold. Steam it for a minute or two, or warm it up in a pan with a bit of water so it won’t stick.

Warming up or steaming cat food does some nice things for your cats:

  • If the cat has a cold or a respiratory problem warming the food brings out the aroma. Cats only eat what they can smell.
  • Increases digestibility especially for older cats with slower digestive systems
  • Nice for cats who are missing teeth
  • Kittens and cats of any age will be reminded of warm mother’s milk. The food will be much more appealing and soothing to any cat.

Four years and 38 cats later a study by the University of Liverpool School of Veterinary Science revealed some interesting things about cats.

Veterinarian and study author, Dr Alex German, said: “Cats, like many humans are more inclined to comfort eat when it’s cold outside but, in their case, it’s likely to be due to the extra energy they need to keep warm when out and about.”

Seasonal food intake has been examined in the past on farm animals, such as dairy cows, to establish new ways of increasing milk production, but this is the largest study that has yet taken place with domestic cats.
Dr German said: “People should consider the amount of food their cats need at different times of year as this can be part of helping them to maintain a healthy weight.”

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-05-cats-winter.html#jCp