How coconut oil will help your cat’s health.

If you are using coconut oil for your health and cooking then you know already know about many of its benefits for people. You’ll be happy to know that your cat will benefit from coconut oil too.

Among the reasons to add ½ to 1 teaspoon to your cat’s food every day:

  • Coconut oil provides the much needed “medium chain fatty acids.”
  • It is 90% saturated fat which is vital for brain health and can stave off dementia and Alzheimer’s
  • Boosts the immune system.
  • Coconut oil is about 40% lauric acid which has been shown to be a preventative of some cancers.
  • Improved digestion, say goodbye to constipation and finding hard cats poops on the floor.
  • Improves thyroid function
  • Antimicrobial
  • Anti bacterial
  • Anti fungal
  • Full of antioxidants
  • Helps prevent the parasite: Giardia
  • Helps the cat absorb more minerals and other nutrients from food.
  • Has been found to fight staph infection better than antibiotics.
  • Immune system boosting.
  • Prevents fur balls
  • Clear up rashes by applying it directly.
  • Heal wounds fast by applying it directly.

Adding coconut oil to cat food:

It’s easy to mix ½ to 1 teaspoon in canned cat food or homemade cat food. Start with a small amount and work up to ½ to 1 teaspoon per day. If you live in a hot climate your coconut oil is probably liquefied so spooning it out is easy. If your climate or house is cool to cold it will be solid – in that case spoon it out, put in a bowl and with your spoon press to soften, then add the food and mix. If you feed crunchies/kibble do your best to mix the two together. Most cats like the taste of coconut oil – we even have a video for you at the end of this newsletter with a cat eating coconut from the shell!

People: improve you oral health and detoxify

The humans at Cat Faeries are big users of coconut oil and in particular we love the Ayurvedic therapy of “oil pulling” or “oil swishing” for our mouths. The oil “pulls” toxins which are spat out after 15 minutes of swishing. Tartar melts away before it can harden which means better gum health and fewer trips to the dentist. It is said that medical conditions such as diabetes improve. Floss first, then swish – we can almost guarantee that a few sneaky food particles hid and will be dislodged by the oil – surprise! Daily swishing means your teeth will be whiter, your gums stronger, and your breath will be fresher. Your mouth will feel sparkling clean for hours after.

Alas, cats can’t swish oil in their mouths, but because you add it to their food they will be happy with improved digestion and to have fur worthy of flaunting! Not to mention your cat is going to feel healthier, younger, and have more bounce to their pounce – the oil will improve their joints!

Here’s one of many articles on coconut oil for swishing.

http://www.saragottfriedmd.com/oil-pulling-whiten-your-teeth-detoxify-your-body-and-prevent-cavities/

Here’s a great article about medium chain fatty acids:

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2010/10/22/coconut-oil-and-saturated-fats-can-make-you-healthy.aspx

When Should Your Cat See an Eye Doctor?

A cat’s eyes view the world with razor sharp detail and precision, and generally a healthy cat will have good vision for all 9 lives. But things can cause loss of vision and it’s best to know what can go wrong, how it can go wrong, and where to seek out the best help. A veterinary eye specialist who has extra diagnostic skills would be your cat’s new best friend.

Cat Faeries trusty feline friend Newton gives us the cat’s eye view of feline vision health, and the medical conditions which can affect it.


Newton’s Purrspective – When Should Your Cat See an Eye Doctor?

Have you ever taken your cat to an eye doctor?

Most people assume cats have nearly perfect vision. In reality their visual acuity is in the range of 20/100 to 20/200. This means that what a cat can see at 20 feet a person can see at 100-200 feet. Of course, we do excel at night vision, needing only 1/6 the amount of light a human would need. http://www.businessinsider.com/pictures-of-how-cats-see-the-world-2013-10 Being nearsighted is no handicap for us at all. The real problem is the eye diseases cats get, some of which can lead to permanent blindness.


Isaac Newton

The most frequently diagnosed ailment is conjunctivitis, an inflammation of the mucous membranes around the eye. It is highly contagious, but curable if treated promptly. Your veterinarian may prescribe antibiotic eye drops or ointment. In addition, you may wish to supplement this with a holistic remedy such as Colloidal Defense, which has many immune system benefits beyond helping eyes heal. Cats also need a calm environment to recover from any illness and to remain healthy. I have four feline siblings and I don’t know what we would do without Convivial Housecat and the Ball of Twine CD. (People enjoy this music too!)

More serious eye conditions include:

An ocular discharge or pawing at the eye are clear signs that professional help is needed as soon as possible. A scratched cornea from rough play is very painful! However, some problems have no obvious symptoms and can only be diagnosed with special instruments such as an ophthalmoscope. When Kitty has an exam your vet will evaluate both eye condition and overall health. (An eye problem can be related to other health issues.) You may then be referred to a veterinary ophthalmologist for additional diagnostics and care.

Cataracts are visible as a cloudiness in the center of the eye. Left untreated they can lead to glaucoma. http://www.veterinaryeyeinstitute.com/cataract-surgery/

Symptoms of glaucoma include pain and swelling of the eyeball. Blindness occurs rapidly if the pressure inside the eye is not reduced. Medications to relieve pain and reduce pressure will be prescribed, but in some cases surgery may be needed. http://www.vcahospitals.com/main/pet-health-information/article/animal-health/glaucoma-in-cats/3938

Uveitis has variable symptoms including squinting, light sensitivity, tearing and discoloration of the eye. http://animaleyecare.net/diseases/uveitis/ The cause, though often difficult to determine, is usually trauma, infection or cancer. The chosen treatment will depend on the probable cause. If glaucoma is also present this MUST be treated as well. Immune system support is vital. (Colloidal Defense helps support the immune system.)

Melanomas are the most common eye tumors in cats. Usually areas of increased pigmentation are visible. However, please note that not all increased pigmentation is pathological – discoloration is often benign. My sister, Tommy Lee Jones, has “iris freckles” in one eye. Don’t take chances with your cat’s eyes. Only a trained professional can make a diagnosis. http://veterinaryvision.com/for-veterinarians/clinical-forum/specific-disease-topics/feline-ophthalmology/

The most common diseases leading to blindness are:

  • uveitis (may be associated with infection or trauma)
  • retinal detachment (often associated with high blood pressure due to hyperthyroidism)
  • trauma (provide a safe environment and trim toenails to decrease risk)

http://www.vet.cornell.edu/fhc/health_information/vision.cfm

An eye exam should be part of your cat’s regular veterinary checkup, as well as blood tests for hyperthyroidism in senior cats. However, if you suspect any problems with your cat’s eyes please seek professional help as soon as possible. Prompt treatment may save Kitty’s sight.

Feline longevity, a long life for your cat.

Everyone wants to live a long and happy life, and your cat is no exception. Cat Faeries is devoted to making the lives of cats healthful, while providing solutions for good behavior. Here are our picks for feline life extension!

Kidney Kitty Flower Essence Formula For Cats
Starting when your cat is young, or really starting at any age because it’s never too late: a few drops in the water bowl every day supports kidney function. We’ve heard from many customers who said that when they ran out they saw a negative difference in their cat. Once they started again the cat rallied!

Here’s a recent quote from a customer…

Pita is almost 15 now. A few weeks ago he was displaying signs of kidney problems – lethargic, lack of appetite, his coat was getting nappy. I upped his daily dose of Kidney Kitty, and I was amazed – he bounced back to his normal self within 3 days!!! Thank you Cat Faeries!

Pam – January, 2015

Elder Support Flower Essence Formula For Cats
At the first sign of age start with this one in the water bowl or mixed into food. Supports joints, the brain, and the thyroid.
Mood Music for Cats (and cat lovers): A Ball of Twine, a CD of calming music
We can’t emphasize enough how soothing sounds and serenity kick illnesses to the curb, extend life, lower blood pressure, lower blood sugar, and so much more. We love this CD. It’s not new agey, these are original compositions which remind us a bit of lullabies. It’s very pretty music. There’s a sound clip at the link – hold your cat while you play it and see the reaction!
Comfort Zone with Feliway – Diffuser Plug-Ins
Even if your cats are perfect with their litter boxes and don’t fight the calming scent of this pheromone will keep them calm. Calm cats = cats who’ll age very well and gracefully. Place one in any room where your cats spend most of their time. Each refill bottle lasts 4 weeks. This is a great investment in your cat’s health and future.

Toys! Toys! Toys! And more Toys!
A lot of human fitness experts have stopped using words like “work” out, rather they are calling exercise “play.” And play is something we like to do no matter our age, cats included. Running, leaping, chasing, stalking, pouncing keeps your cat young with limber joints and a trim body. Our toys are American made. The catnip inside is ethically wildcrafted with the highest level of nepetalactone of any catnip on the planet (yes, it’s been tested!). The unique shapes, fabrics, and sizes appeal to cats of all ages, and the adorableness appeals to people.

Sleep my pretties, sleep! (in a Faerie Cat Bed!)

Our cat beds are American made in a small factory in California by workers who are paid a living wage and are treated very well. And they are pretty! And soft. Our beds do not have that toxic foam on the sides. Who wants toxins! Besides, those beds can’t be washed, and your cat can’t bend or position the sides to be comfy and cozy. Our beds wash beautifully and they are attractive to your cat and will look great in your home.

And, Green Cat Beds Are On Sale!

Cats eat 15% more food in Winter

We people know that chilly weather makes us hungry for more food. This time of year we begin to crave roasted vegetables and meats, and we hunt for new recipes for stews and soups. Hot food warms our bones and hearts!

Often we don’t realize that our cats respond to weather changes like we do. During Summer while we are eating salad our carnivore friends might leave food behind in the bowl. But in Winter the bowl is licked clean and they meow for more.

How much more? A study that we found told us that in Winter cats will eat about 15% more food than during the rest of the year.

Be a rock star Feline Chef and don’t grab food for your cat from the fridge and serve it cold. Steam it for a minute or two, or warm it up in a pan with a bit of water so it won’t stick.

Warming up or steaming cat food does some nice things for your cats:

  • If the cat has a cold or a respiratory problem warming the food brings out the aroma. Cats only eat what they can smell.
  • Increases digestibility especially for older cats with slower digestive systems
  • Nice for cats who are missing teeth
  • Kittens and cats of any age will be reminded of warm mother’s milk. The food will be much more appealing and soothing to any cat.

Four years and 38 cats later a study by the University of Liverpool School of Veterinary Science revealed some interesting things about cats.

Veterinarian and study author, Dr Alex German, said: “Cats, like many humans are more inclined to comfort eat when it’s cold outside but, in their case, it’s likely to be due to the extra energy they need to keep warm when out and about.”

Seasonal food intake has been examined in the past on farm animals, such as dairy cows, to establish new ways of increasing milk production, but this is the largest study that has yet taken place with domestic cats.
Dr German said: “People should consider the amount of food their cats need at different times of year as this can be part of helping them to maintain a healthy weight.”

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-05-cats-winter.html#jCp

Dr. Cheryl Schwartz DVM on helping your Diabetic cat




When Dr. Cheryl Schwartz wanted to learn about veterinary acupuncture she found that a book on the subject did not exist – even in China where acupuncture originated. She turned to the text books for human doctors, and took courses in human acupuncture knowing she could transfer what she learned for people to animals. After years of treating patients with 4 feet and a tail she wrote her book “Four Paws, Five Directions, Traditional Chinese Medicine for Cats and Dogs” which is now a text book in China.




Here is a Cat Faeries exclusive Q and A with Dr. Cheryl Schwartz DVM:

1) I know that for my own diabetes (type 2) the ideal diet is very low carb, moderate protein, and high fat. It’s worked wonders. Would you say that a similar diet for cats who have diabetes or for people who don’t want their cat to get diabetes is a good idea? And what about for cats with kidney failure? It seems to me that both ways of feeding a cat is ideal.

Dr. Schwartz: Great ideas and questions! Low carb, moderate protein and high fat are beneficial for cats with diabetes and kidney failure

2) I’m eating a lot of organ meats (also known as offal). In particular, lamb sweetbreads*. Which by the way, my cats love (recipe to follow). How do you feel about organ meats vs muscle meat for cats with diabetes or kidney failure?

Dr Schwartz: I prefer small amounts of organ meat mixed with muscle meat, because higher amounts seem to create constipation and stagnation in cats.

* Cat Faeries Note: See below for two recipies for lamb sweetbreads – one for cats, one for people.

3) My MD has me on 70 grams of protein a day and I’m surprised that I’m liking eating less protein and more fat. What might you recommend for an average sized cat of about 11 pounds? What ratio of meat to fat to vegetable do you like?

Dr. Schwartz: I don’t usually break it down between fat and protein. I use more TCM therapy. I recommend the fatty meats like lamb, chicken, beef. Some cats with diabetes do well on stewed or boiled pork loin or butt. It is important to make sure the cat does not also have pancreatitis where fat metabolism/absorption can create more inflammation, so each cat seems to be unique. Ratio between meat and vegetables would be 2/3 meat to 1/3 veggies, including some sweet potato.

4) I no longer cook my own meats at a high heat because the high heat creates “advanced glycation” which happens inside the body when charred, grilled, or fried meat is consumed. I understand that this means it turns to sugar when it’s eaten and this is one of the reason diabetes is has become practically an epidemic for people, and also our cats and dogs. I steam, stew, boil, simmer, or poach my meats now and eat them pretty rare. Would you recommend those techniques for a cat’s meat? Do you have anything to say about advanced glycation and how to prevent it?

Dr Schwartz: High heat is present in dry food and it does increase the sugar content. I recommend stewing or poaching, or hot pot as best ways to prepare. If the cat can tolerate and like it, I would recommend raw food.

5) There has been a lot of talk lately about resistant starch and safe starches for people – basically steamed potatoes and white rice, severed with something acidic (like lemon juice), fat and served cold. For people it can be healing to the gut and it gives people some carbs which do not jack their blood sugar. Any value in this theory for cats?

Dr. Schwartz: I like steamed sweet potato or pumpkin for cats.

6) Are there safe carbs for a cat? Any safe grains?

Dr. Schwartz: It depends on the cat. I really like the sweet potato, pumpkin. Another alternative is mashed cooked lentils or garbanzo beans with cooked white rice. Adding a small piece of pickle* is sometimes tolerated by some cats. Either the cat likes it or not.

* Cat Faeries Note: Coming up in another newsletter, how to properly lacto ferment vegetables suitable for you and your cats.

7) Which fats are good for cats? For people ideal fats are saturated and those include: coconut oil, MCT oil, lard, grass fed butter.

Dr Schwartz: Cat Faeries fish oil mainly. Grass fed butter*, olive oil, small amounts coconut oil.

* Cat Faeries Note: www.mcclellandsdairy.com/ or www.pureindianfoods.com are who we buy our grass fed butter or ghee.

8) Which flower essences help cats with either or both conditions?

Dr. Schwartz: Kidney Kitty is good. It would also be helpful for diabetes cats

9) You are big on color therapy. Would you recommend shining a colored light on a cat?

Dr Schwartz: For the kidneys use blue light. Shine the light around the kidney area in lumbar vertebrae. For diabetes use yellow or green light and shine it at the end of the ribs (Thoracic V) and beginning of the lumbar as well as Spleen 6.

10) Any other therapies that a person might employ?

Dr. Schwartz: Other great modalities might be sound therapy with tuning forks.

11) What acupressure points are good for diabetic cats and cats with some form of renal failure?



For diabetes



For renal failure

(Photos from “Four Paws, Five Directions, Traditional Chinese Medicine for Cats and Dogs” used with permission of Dr. Cheryl Schwartz)



Your Cat Faeries’ Lamb Sweetbreads Recipie

Lamb sweetbreads are the pancreas and thymus of young sheep and they are one of the most nutrient dense foods there is. You only want to buy them from organic/pastured sources. To find them in your state: www.eatwild.com

  • Soak a pound or so of sweet breads in cold water for two hours
  • You might rinse them a few times during their soak
  • Strain in a colander in the sink
  • You want to pull off the big chunky fat pieces – the reason is that this fat isn’t delicious, it can be bitter, and the tough texture clashes with the dumpling like texture of the sweet breads
  • Try to remove some of the membrane without tearing or compromising the shape of the sweet breads
  • Cut them into uniform sizes so that they cook evenly. About 1 and a half inch pieces.
  • Par boil in gently boiling water for 5 minutes and drain

IF SERVING TO CATS – STOP HERE! The seasonings which are good and healthful to us are not good for cats (onion especially)

Continue on only for people…

  • Melt a lot of butter in a pan
  • Add some white wine and stir vigorously to make a slight reduction
  • Seasonings can include salt and pepper, a pinch of cumin powder, onion powder (organic and delicious onion powder can be bought at Azure Farms online)
  • Add the sweet breads
  • Simmer for 20 to 25 minutes. Interestingly, they do not dry out, yet if they are undercooked the texture isn’t very nice.
    At this point you can remove them and do a thicker white wine and butter deduction sauce by adding more of both, and stirring vigorously
  • You could even put some heavy cream in at this point or a bit of soft goat cheese
  • Put the sweetbreads back in the pan so the flavors marry with the sauce
  • Some people fry up the fat bits and have them separately
  • Leftovers are so good that they are even good cold!
  • You might experiment with adding cooked sausage and mushrooms

4 oz. size now available for Kidney Kitty and Elder Support Cat Faeries Flower Essences for Cats

It took a long time to find American made 4 oz. bottles and when we found them we offered them again for Multi Cat Household, Territorial Rescue, Calm and Serene, and Love My Litter Box. We got requests for 4 oz. bottles of Kidney Kitty and Elder Support, and because we want you to be happy – we’ve got them for you!