Anti Icky Poo Spring Cleaning Tips!

Here are some creative Spring Cleaning methods you can use Anti Icky Poo for:


Dump the litter in the litter boxes, pour in ¼ to ½ cup of Anti Icky Poo and enough cool water to cover the bottom. Let the enzymes and specially bred bacteria gobble up the icky crud at the bottom of the box and in its corners. Spray Anti Icky Poo on the sides of the box and the floor beneath it. You might also spray some on the walls around the litter box to remove dust and powders and any “back splash.” Your cats will be ecstatic with everything so sparkling clean.


If you have soiled gym clothes, play or work clothes that you thought might be past the point of no return, Anti Icky Poo renews their life by getting the funky stains and odors out. Put ¼ to 1/2 cup of Anti Icky Poo in a washing machine half way full of cold water (remember to test for color safety in a small unseen spot first). For small pieces (like a dress) you might want to soak overnight in a tub. Soaking your clothes for 12 hours or overnight will work miracles!


Recently Madam Cat Faerie spilled melted butter and pan drippings all down a fragile cotton dress. There were countless spots and the oils saturated the dress to the point where she thought it was hopeless. Soaking it in a tub over night with Anti Icky Poo and enough water to spread the cleaner enough to penetrate the fibers took every last trace of it out. Not one brown or yellow spot can be found!


Even if your cat has never peed on a pillow our evening sweat and body odors can make a pillow not so pleasant. First thing in a morning when you’ll be home all day remove and wash the pillow case. Hang up the pillow on a clothes rack or line with clothes pins. Give the pillow a light misting of Anti Icky Poo on all sides. Repeat this every hour for about 6 hours. Then allow to dry.


You can also do this with your mattress and sofa cushions. Remove the mattress and cushions, then tilt them against a wall. Spray it on all sides lightly once an hour for 6 hours. Then allow it to dry before replacing it to the bed.


Is the carpet feeling and smelling a bit funky? Anti Icky Poo works great in a carpet cleaning machine (which you can rent if you don’t own one). You can also give the give your rugs a light misting, hourly, over the course of a few hours.


Take a fresh quart of Anti Icky Poo and go to every room with a drain. Pour ¼ to ½ cup down each drain. Let it be for at least one hour. The enzymes are going to eat up the soap scum and grease! Chomp Chomp! It can’t eat through hair, but the other crud will be gone and that will save you oodles of money on plumbers! We don’t even remember the last time we needed to call in a plumber because of Anti Icky Poo’s safe, nontoxic, non-corrosive, and totally natural drain cleaning abilities!

A spraying cat: possible warning that another cat is sick.

Recently we heard from a long time customer who told us that one of her cats will spray urine when another furry family member is sick.

Changes in cat behavior around others’ illness have been reported in the press. This link is to an article that talks about how cats can behave when another is sick or dying, and how they sometimes behave quite differently when another cat has cancer.

http://www.petsadviser.com/behaviors/can-cats-tell-when-another-cat-is-dying/

Scientific studies have shown that dogs can detect cancer in people at very early stages using their sense of smell. They can also predict seizures and sense low blood pressure, vitally important for their diabetic human companions. Here’s a link to more information.

http://pets.webmd.com/features/pets-amazing-abilities

It can be quite interesting when a cat sprays or pees out of the box – sometimes it’s our first warning that another animal in the house is sick or is getting sick. It can also happen when an animal comes home from the vet, or crosses the bridge. They can sense it or smell it, and they’ll worry “I might be next!” so they’ll spray or pee out of fear or nerves. These cats are particularly sensitive, almost like those cancer smelling dogs we read about!

Convivial House Cat Spray and Feliway can really help steady the nerves of such a sensitive cat!

You can’t know too much about Anti Icky Poo! A Q&A.

Here is an interesting Q & A between Cat Faeries and a customer which we think you’d like to read. We’ve edited it a bit here and there.

Question: For clean up, I have used vinegar with water spray. A “natural” spray cleaner from a conglomerate chain store. I’ve also used ammonia in a spray bottle.

Answer: OH NO! Ammonia is the worst! And this is why: Cat urine, in fact all urine from any species, has an ammonia like quality. Our housecats instinctively seek out the smell of ammonia, which ideally is only detected in the litter boxes. This tells the cat: “it’s ok to pee here! This is where we cats are to urinate.”

What you accidently did was spread the smell of ammonia around your home! But don’t feel bad or beat yourself up, today is a new day, we begin anew! We will conquer this problem together!

Vinegar does nothing other than in the short run it’s nice to clean up a fresh puddle. But it will not eradicate the smell or the urine proteins and gases, or that ammonia.

That’s why it’s imperative to use a product like Anti Icky Poo which does not mask the odor, but actually eats urine’s proteins and gases, thus eradicating it completely.

Q: The peeing and spraying is happening in living room, kitchen, dining area, pantry, and porch. A few spots in each room- example, the fire hearth, in front of refrigerator door, by dog treat bin in pantry, on treadmill. Since I’ve got cat urine all over my home, and I’ve probably put the smell of ammonia throughout my house too, what can I do?

A: Do you recall how in your Feliway handout we talk about using it in each room “here and there”?
You are going to do something similar with Anti Icky Poo – PLUS – use it on the spots that you know have been hit. These are methods that we created based on our many years of experience.

The reason for Here and There with Anti Icky Poo is that when we suspect that there is urine in places you don’t know about we want to cover our bases.

When a cat sprays they do one of two things:

  • They empty their tank on one surface or wall
  • They can spray little drops or a fine mist on multiple things to claim the entire house or garden as IT”S MINE! Therefore it could be worse than your nose tells you.

Go through your home with your bottle of Anti Icky Poo with the sprayer intact. Approach a variety of surfaces and objects and give a fine baby misting of Anti Icky Poo “here and there.” Do this for a few days. After a few days this should de-stink and allow you to reclaim your home!

Q: They both used the litter boxes until old cat passed, and now young female won’t always let other old male on the porch to use litter boxes.

A: When an older cat dies it’s always best to get new litter boxes. There could be lingering smells. A good example is the awful smell of impending death when an old cat is ready to pass. This can freak out any remaining animals “I could be next!” And this can be the trigger for spraying or not urinating in a litter box.

A point we always like to make about why we don’t like having multiple litter boxes throughout a house, particularly a smaller house. When boxes are scattered throughout a house the smell of ammonia is in every room that a box is in. This tells the cat it’s ok to deposit urine in multiple rooms, and the sight of litter boxes everywhere and the odor cannot be pleasant for you! Cats don’t avoid their litter box because they are too lazy to walk over to where the boxes are.

Q: The flooring of our home is completely tiled and they have urinated on it.

A: You are very lucky to have such wonderful floors! My dad was a tile setter so I grew up with tile floors. Urine can penetrate the grout especially if it’s modern grout as opposed to 1960’s grout which was indestructible. Probably a few days of treating the tile with Anti Icky Poo will eradicate any urine which may have penetrated the tiles or grout.

Q: I was confusing the flower essences for essential oils – sorry! How many drops per gallon of water? We change the water twice a day, but we need to use big water bowl because big dog drinks a lot.

A: Most people have smaller water bowls and we suggest 3 to 5 drops. For your big bowl start with 5 drops for the gallon. You may need a few more drops. In addition to adding drops to the water bowl rub some on her head, ears, back when you have the time.

Sale on Urine Cleaning Products!

All Anti Icky Poo cleaning products (Anti Icky Poo, P-Bath, Stain Remover) are on sale! But act fast, the sale ends in 10 days at midnight on Thursday October 2.

If you’ve used Anti Icky Poo urine cleaner before, you know it works! If you are new, get ready to be delighted – this is THE ONE that really works. How and why does it work? It literally eats the urine proteins and gases, which means odor is gone baby gone! For your nose and the cat’s nose. You might need P Bath to pre treat if you used anything anti microbial in the past or if the stains is especially old and gross. Generally Anti Icky Poo alone is enough to remove the yellow, but if it wasn’t enough, then get Stain Remover. Reclaim your home! Get rid of that awful kennel smell!

Toxoplasmosis, cats and pregnant women. Is your doctor giving you bad advice?

We cringe every time we hear that another cat has lost a home because of bad and incorrect warnings from doctors directed at pregnant women.

We finally found a really good article that clears the air about cats, toxoplasmosis and pregnant or nursing women.

Far too many obstetricians attempting to sound smart have given women bad and very wrong advice: “Get rid of your cat to protect your child.”

If your cat stays inside and has never eaten a rodent the chances of your cat carrying this parasite are remote. Concerned about your cat? Have the cat tested!

From the article we’ve linked to below:

Question: Do I have to give up my cat if I’m pregnant or planning on becoming pregnant?

Answer: No. You should follow these helpful tips to reduce your risk of environmental exposure to Toxoplasma.

  • Avoid changing cat litter if possible. If no one else can perform the task, wear disposable gloves and wash your hands with soap and warm water afterwards.
  • Ensure that the cat litter box is changed daily. The Toxoplasma parasite does not become infectious until 1 to 5 days after it is shed in a cat’s feces.
  • Feed your cat commercial dry or canned food, not raw or undercooked meats.
  • Keep cats indoors.
  • Avoid stray cats, especially kittens. Do not get a new cat while you are pregnant.
  • Keep outdoor sandboxes covered.
  • Wear gloves when gardening and during contact with soil or sand because it might be contaminated with cat feces that contain Toxoplasma. Wash hands with soap and warm water after gardening or contact with soil or sand.

Read the entire article: http://www.cdc.gov/parasites/toxoplasmosis/gen_info/pregnant.html

The ASPCA has a good page about Toxoplasmosis and cats. Here’s something they say:

If you suspect your cat is carrying the parasite that causes toxoplasmosis, it’s time to get him tested by your veterinarian. If he tests positive, it means he has been exposed to the disease but is unlikely to be shedding oocysts after an initial two-week period. If he tests negative, it means he has not been exposed and could still become infected and shed oocysts — but again only for two weeks.

Read more from the ASPCA: http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/cat-care/toxoplasmosis

From a new mother’s forum, moms and a vet student speak:

http://www.babycenter.com/400_chances-of-toxoplasmosis-with-an-indoor-cat_1505321_868.bc

99 Reasons to not give or receive perfume this season (or use scented cat litter)

During this time of year perfume and fragrance sales soar. We have those manipulative Mad Men on Madison Avenue to thank for planting the seeds that giving and receiving perfume is synonymous with the holidays. And then there are those awful and toxic chemically scented plug-ins and “air fresheners.” In more recent years chemically scented candles have been choking the air out of homes worldwide.

Eco-writer Jill Ettinger is allowing us to re-print her article that gives you 99 reasons to stop using fragrance now. It’s a quick read with bulleted points about the dangers of perfume and other fragrances. Cat Faeries has been talking about the many reasons to not use scented kitty litter since our beginning, just over 20 years ago and every chance we get we talk about how bad fragrance is for cats, people and everything else.



Artificial Fragrances are Poison: 99 Reasons to Stop Wearing Perfume

by Jill Ettinger

We have a body odor problem in this country. But it’s not what you probably think. Yes, some of us stink pretty badly (thanks, Standard American Diet), but that’s not the problem. The issue is our relentless pursuit to cover up our body odor with artificial fragrances and perfumes.

Somewhere down the line we decided that detergents and chemicals smell more pleasant than our armpits. We traded in natural botanicals for hazardous materials. We let celebrities sell us perfumes because we think that’s what they must smell like all the time, and if we use their perfume, we’ll smell like a celebrity too.

While we’re now protected in most every public place from cigarette smoke’s hazardous effects, we have no protection against toxic fragrances. If you asked a flight attendant to reseat you because the person seated next to you reeked like Hannah Montana perfume, they’d smile apologetically. Yet fragrances pose serious health risks on par with cigarette smoke.

Think your Axe Body Spray is doing us all a favor? Think again. Here are 99 reasons to stop wearing artificial fragrances and perfumes.

  1. A single perfumed product can contain thousands of fragrances.
  2. And none of them have to come from a natural botanical source.
  3. So can: laundry detergent
  4. Antiperspirant
  5. Deodorant
  6. Shampoo
  7. Conditioner
  8. Lotion
  9. Soap
  10. Candles
  11. Skin care products
  12. Cleaning products
  13. Makeup
  14. And feminine hygiene products
  15. A self-regulated industry, manufacturers do not need to disclose these ingredients (they’re “trade secrets”).
  16. Fragrances contain phthalates.
  17. Phthalates have been linked to reproductive issues
  18. Early puberty in girls
  19. Organ damage
  20. Birth defects
  21. Immune response issues
  22. Endocrine disruption.
  23. Fragrances can cause headaches
  24. Mood swings
  25. Depression
  26. Anxiety
  27. Hyperactivity
  28. Brain fog
  29. Allergies
  30. Sore throat
  31. Watery eyes
  32. Eczema
  33. Rashes
  34. Coughing
  35. Asthma
  36. Erratic blood pressure
  37. Nausea
  38. Vomiting
  39. Abdominal pain
  40. And cancer.
  41. According to Dr. Mercola, synthetic musk, which is widely used in fragrances, can contain several harmful chemicals including:
  42. Xylene
  43. Ketone
  44. HHCB
  45. HHCB-lactone (the oxidation product of HHCB)
  46. AHTN
  47. Tonalide
  48. And galaxolide.
  49. Fragrances contain benzene.
  50. The American Cancer Society considers it a cancer risk.
  51. According to safe cosmetics, “one in every 50 people may suffer immune system damage from fragrance.”
  52. And “once sensitized to an ingredient, a person can remain so for a lifetime, enduring allergic reactions with every subsequent exposure.”
  53. Many fragrance ingredients are considered neurotoxins (damaging to the brain).
  54. Where there’s artificial fragrance, there are also parabens.
  55. Parabens can interfere with hormonal functions.
  56. They’re linked to cancer.
  57. And they may actually make your skin look older, faster.
  58. Dioxane is a common ingredient in detergents.
  59. Tests done on the popular Tide brand of detergent, showed that it contained 55 parts per million of dioxane.
  60. Levels as low as 5 to 10 parts per million have been shown to pose health risks.
  61. Dioxane even appears in some products labeled as “organic” or “natural.”
  62. Sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) or sodium laureth sulfate (SLES), short for sodium lauryl ether sulfate, are common in fragranced products.
  63. More than 16,000 studies show that SLS in any form causes eye and skin irritation.
  64. And organ toxicity
  65. And neurotoxicity
  66. And developmental toxicity
  67. And reproductive issues
  68. And endocrine disruption
  69. And mutations
  70. …And cancer.
  71. NPE (nonylphenol ethoxylate) found in fragranced products has been linked to kidney damage.
  72. And liver damage
  73. And growth issues
  74. And metabolic issues
  75. And underdeveloped testicles
  76. And low sperm count.
  77. Fragrance-containing products are often tested on rabbits.
  78. And mice
  79. And rats
  80. And monkeys
  81. And cats.
  82. Our love for fragrances has an impact on the environment as well.
  83. Synthetic musk is accumulating in wild animals in toxic levels.
  84. Water filtration systems can’t remove some of the more toxic fragrance ingredients from our water supply.
  85. Some fragrances come from animals, taken in harmful ways.
  86. Amebergris comes from sperm whales.
  87. African Stone or Hyraceum comes from the hyrax (a very small, cute cousin to the elephant).
  88. Deer musk and civet cats are also exploited for their fragrance.
  89. Castoreum comes from the anal gland of a beaver.
  90. Fragrances don’t actually relieve your body odor problems anyway.
  91. They just mask it.
  92. Temporarily.
  93. Sometimes they just co-mingle with your body odor, making for very strange smells.
  94. Fragranced products cost you more money,
  95. While putting your health at risk.
  96. Fragranced products are often used to attract people, but the toxins can have the opposite effect…
  97. Repelling love interests.
  98. Making them feel sick. Literally.
  99. Even if they truly want to feel otherwise.

 Keep in touch with Jill on Twitter @jillettinger

Resources

http://safecosmetics.org/article.php?id=222

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2010/07/22/the-reckless-selfinterest-of-the-fragrance-industry.aspx

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2012/01/12/paraben-chemical-linked-to-breast-cancer_n_1202144.html

http://functionaldiagnosticnutrition.com/laundry-detergents-pose-serious-health-risks/

http://davidsuzuki.org/issues/health/science/toxics/fragrance-and-parfum/