How coconut oil will help your cat’s health.

If you are using coconut oil for your health and cooking then you know already know about many of its benefits for people. You’ll be happy to know that your cat will benefit from coconut oil too.

Among the reasons to add ½ to 1 teaspoon to your cat’s food every day:

  • Coconut oil provides the much needed “medium chain fatty acids.”
  • It is 90% saturated fat which is vital for brain health and can stave off dementia and Alzheimer’s
  • Boosts the immune system.
  • Coconut oil is about 40% lauric acid which has been shown to be a preventative of some cancers.
  • Improved digestion, say goodbye to constipation and finding hard cats poops on the floor.
  • Improves thyroid function
  • Antimicrobial
  • Anti bacterial
  • Anti fungal
  • Full of antioxidants
  • Helps prevent the parasite: Giardia
  • Helps the cat absorb more minerals and other nutrients from food.
  • Has been found to fight staph infection better than antibiotics.
  • Immune system boosting.
  • Prevents fur balls
  • Clear up rashes by applying it directly.
  • Heal wounds fast by applying it directly.

Adding coconut oil to cat food:

It’s easy to mix ½ to 1 teaspoon in canned cat food or homemade cat food. Start with a small amount and work up to ½ to 1 teaspoon per day. If you live in a hot climate your coconut oil is probably liquefied so spooning it out is easy. If your climate or house is cool to cold it will be solid – in that case spoon it out, put in a bowl and with your spoon press to soften, then add the food and mix. If you feed crunchies/kibble do your best to mix the two together. Most cats like the taste of coconut oil – we even have a video for you at the end of this newsletter with a cat eating coconut from the shell!

People: improve you oral health and detoxify

The humans at Cat Faeries are big users of coconut oil and in particular we love the Ayurvedic therapy of “oil pulling” or “oil swishing” for our mouths. The oil “pulls” toxins which are spat out after 15 minutes of swishing. Tartar melts away before it can harden which means better gum health and fewer trips to the dentist. It is said that medical conditions such as diabetes improve. Floss first, then swish – we can almost guarantee that a few sneaky food particles hid and will be dislodged by the oil – surprise! Daily swishing means your teeth will be whiter, your gums stronger, and your breath will be fresher. Your mouth will feel sparkling clean for hours after.

Alas, cats can’t swish oil in their mouths, but because you add it to their food they will be happy with improved digestion and to have fur worthy of flaunting! Not to mention your cat is going to feel healthier, younger, and have more bounce to their pounce – the oil will improve their joints!

Here’s one of many articles on coconut oil for swishing.

http://www.saragottfriedmd.com/oil-pulling-whiten-your-teeth-detoxify-your-body-and-prevent-cavities/

Here’s a great article about medium chain fatty acids:

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2010/10/22/coconut-oil-and-saturated-fats-can-make-you-healthy.aspx

Why Sprouts Are Good for Cats: Make healthful Kitty Spaghetti from red clover seeds

We’ve always been fans of wheat grass for cats, having written what could have been the first article ever on the benefits of wheat grass for cats in Tiger Tribe magazine back in 1993.

Yaelle is a Cat Faeries customer and for over 20 years she’s made what she calls Kitty Spaghetti or Cat Salad from sprouted red clover seeds. She has tended to countless cats from her own, as well as ferals and fosters. A true cat whisperer! Here’s what she has to say about red clover sprouts.


Yaelle’s Healthy “Cat Salad” or “Kitty Spaghetti”

This is my simple “cat salad/kitty spaghetti” recipe that I feed my cats, to all my rescues/fosters, too. In over 20 years only 3 cats have refused this delicious and nutritious dish. Kitties gobble this up faster than I’ve seen cats eat any other kind of food.

What you need:

  • red clover seeds
  • A clean 1 quart Mason jar
  • Something mesh like: panty hose, cheese cloth.
  • A rubber band
  • Filtered water
  • Alternatively you could be a special sprouting jar at your local health food store, but truly a Mason jar is just as good and it’s practically free!

HERE’S A BASIC HOW-TO-SPROUT RECIPE:
1: Take red clover seeds and put them in your clean quart-sized jar. For one or two cats: 1 to 2 tablespoons. For more cats and yourself add 4 to 6 tablespoons of seeds.

2: Add purified or filtered water enough that the water is several inches above the seeds. The seeds will expand, so make sure you have enough water covering them.

3: Soak overnight.

4: In the morning pour off water. Then add more water through the pantyhose or cheesecloth and rinse the seeds well. Do this a couple of times. Once you’ve done your final rinse place mouth of jar down at 45 degree angle for drainage and ventilation. There are several ways you can tilt the jars at a 45 degree angle. You can use a dish drainer or prop the jar up at the correct angle with dish towels and something to lean the jar against.

5: Rinse twice a day with fresh cool water.

6: After 4 or 5 days you’ve got mature sprouts. Don’t let them go longer, they’ll get bigger and tough. It’s now time to start using them. Your sprouts are fresh for almost one week stored in a glass jar in the fridge.

Once you get the hang of this you can keep a jar or two in rotation so that you don’t run out of sprouts. It’s a bit tricky at first to get the rhythm down, and for a long time I found that either I had too many sprouts or I was running out. Eventually with practice, you develop a system that works optimally for you, your cats and your schedule. This delicate sprouting process doesn’t have to be a perfect science. Even if the sprouts are not fully grown, as long as they have sprouted, they are a “living food” and what’s essential for this healthful recipe!

I have 3 quart-sized glass jars “going” at all times:

  • One jar has seeds that are soaking. I soak my seeds about every 3 or 4 days.
  • The 2nd jar has sprouts that are in the growing stage.
  • The 3rd jar has the sprouts that are ready to harvest.

Time to add sprouts to your cat’s food!

After your sprouts are ready, you take your preferred moist cat food. I recommend Primal Freeze-Dried Formula for Cats It comes in little “bricks” or nuggets. It’s frozen 100% human-grade raw organic food full of wonderful things such as coconut oil. It’s a bit expensive but worth it if you can afford it.

Here’s where to find this cat food: http://www.primalpetfoods.com/locator/index.php

(Cat Faeries recommends the turkey flavor as we do not trust fish from any source at this time. This is what we feed our own cats, and only the turkey flavor.)

Put the cat’s food in a bowl and add sprouts, mixing with a fork. You might give the sprouts a rough chop first.

In addition you could add a little cod liver oil for skin and fur. It has lots of vitamin A and D and tastes fishy so cats really go for it! Kitties (and humans) really need their healthy fats.

Finally, to “spice” things up, I always sprinkle some spirulina into my cat salad/kitty spaghetti.

I only have known 3 cats who would not eat the “cat salad/kitty spaghetti” from the very first serving. For those cats you could add a few of your kitty’s favorite and healthful kibble just like “meatballs” on top of spaghetti or salad “croutons”!

BON APPETIT

With all my love,
Yaelle


Here’s a picture of Yaelle’s Cassie…

Cats eat 15% more food in Winter

We people know that chilly weather makes us hungry for more food. This time of year we begin to crave roasted vegetables and meats, and we hunt for new recipes for stews and soups. Hot food warms our bones and hearts!

Often we don’t realize that our cats respond to weather changes like we do. During Summer while we are eating salad our carnivore friends might leave food behind in the bowl. But in Winter the bowl is licked clean and they meow for more.

How much more? A study that we found told us that in Winter cats will eat about 15% more food than during the rest of the year.

Be a rock star Feline Chef and don’t grab food for your cat from the fridge and serve it cold. Steam it for a minute or two, or warm it up in a pan with a bit of water so it won’t stick.

Warming up or steaming cat food does some nice things for your cats:

  • If the cat has a cold or a respiratory problem warming the food brings out the aroma. Cats only eat what they can smell.
  • Increases digestibility especially for older cats with slower digestive systems
  • Nice for cats who are missing teeth
  • Kittens and cats of any age will be reminded of warm mother’s milk. The food will be much more appealing and soothing to any cat.

Four years and 38 cats later a study by the University of Liverpool School of Veterinary Science revealed some interesting things about cats.

Veterinarian and study author, Dr Alex German, said: “Cats, like many humans are more inclined to comfort eat when it’s cold outside but, in their case, it’s likely to be due to the extra energy they need to keep warm when out and about.”

Seasonal food intake has been examined in the past on farm animals, such as dairy cows, to establish new ways of increasing milk production, but this is the largest study that has yet taken place with domestic cats.
Dr German said: “People should consider the amount of food their cats need at different times of year as this can be part of helping them to maintain a healthy weight.”

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-05-cats-winter.html#jCp

Dr. Cheryl Schwartz DVM on helping your Diabetic cat




When Dr. Cheryl Schwartz wanted to learn about veterinary acupuncture she found that a book on the subject did not exist – even in China where acupuncture originated. She turned to the text books for human doctors, and took courses in human acupuncture knowing she could transfer what she learned for people to animals. After years of treating patients with 4 feet and a tail she wrote her book “Four Paws, Five Directions, Traditional Chinese Medicine for Cats and Dogs” which is now a text book in China.




Here is a Cat Faeries exclusive Q and A with Dr. Cheryl Schwartz DVM:

1) I know that for my own diabetes (type 2) the ideal diet is very low carb, moderate protein, and high fat. It’s worked wonders. Would you say that a similar diet for cats who have diabetes or for people who don’t want their cat to get diabetes is a good idea? And what about for cats with kidney failure? It seems to me that both ways of feeding a cat is ideal.

Dr. Schwartz: Great ideas and questions! Low carb, moderate protein and high fat are beneficial for cats with diabetes and kidney failure

2) I’m eating a lot of organ meats (also known as offal). In particular, lamb sweetbreads*. Which by the way, my cats love (recipe to follow). How do you feel about organ meats vs muscle meat for cats with diabetes or kidney failure?

Dr Schwartz: I prefer small amounts of organ meat mixed with muscle meat, because higher amounts seem to create constipation and stagnation in cats.

* Cat Faeries Note: See below for two recipies for lamb sweetbreads – one for cats, one for people.

3) My MD has me on 70 grams of protein a day and I’m surprised that I’m liking eating less protein and more fat. What might you recommend for an average sized cat of about 11 pounds? What ratio of meat to fat to vegetable do you like?

Dr. Schwartz: I don’t usually break it down between fat and protein. I use more TCM therapy. I recommend the fatty meats like lamb, chicken, beef. Some cats with diabetes do well on stewed or boiled pork loin or butt. It is important to make sure the cat does not also have pancreatitis where fat metabolism/absorption can create more inflammation, so each cat seems to be unique. Ratio between meat and vegetables would be 2/3 meat to 1/3 veggies, including some sweet potato.

4) I no longer cook my own meats at a high heat because the high heat creates “advanced glycation” which happens inside the body when charred, grilled, or fried meat is consumed. I understand that this means it turns to sugar when it’s eaten and this is one of the reason diabetes is has become practically an epidemic for people, and also our cats and dogs. I steam, stew, boil, simmer, or poach my meats now and eat them pretty rare. Would you recommend those techniques for a cat’s meat? Do you have anything to say about advanced glycation and how to prevent it?

Dr Schwartz: High heat is present in dry food and it does increase the sugar content. I recommend stewing or poaching, or hot pot as best ways to prepare. If the cat can tolerate and like it, I would recommend raw food.

5) There has been a lot of talk lately about resistant starch and safe starches for people – basically steamed potatoes and white rice, severed with something acidic (like lemon juice), fat and served cold. For people it can be healing to the gut and it gives people some carbs which do not jack their blood sugar. Any value in this theory for cats?

Dr. Schwartz: I like steamed sweet potato or pumpkin for cats.

6) Are there safe carbs for a cat? Any safe grains?

Dr. Schwartz: It depends on the cat. I really like the sweet potato, pumpkin. Another alternative is mashed cooked lentils or garbanzo beans with cooked white rice. Adding a small piece of pickle* is sometimes tolerated by some cats. Either the cat likes it or not.

* Cat Faeries Note: Coming up in another newsletter, how to properly lacto ferment vegetables suitable for you and your cats.

7) Which fats are good for cats? For people ideal fats are saturated and those include: coconut oil, MCT oil, lard, grass fed butter.

Dr Schwartz: Cat Faeries fish oil mainly. Grass fed butter*, olive oil, small amounts coconut oil.

* Cat Faeries Note: www.mcclellandsdairy.com/ or www.pureindianfoods.com are who we buy our grass fed butter or ghee.

8) Which flower essences help cats with either or both conditions?

Dr. Schwartz: Kidney Kitty is good. It would also be helpful for diabetes cats

9) You are big on color therapy. Would you recommend shining a colored light on a cat?

Dr Schwartz: For the kidneys use blue light. Shine the light around the kidney area in lumbar vertebrae. For diabetes use yellow or green light and shine it at the end of the ribs (Thoracic V) and beginning of the lumbar as well as Spleen 6.

10) Any other therapies that a person might employ?

Dr. Schwartz: Other great modalities might be sound therapy with tuning forks.

11) What acupressure points are good for diabetic cats and cats with some form of renal failure?



For diabetes



For renal failure

(Photos from “Four Paws, Five Directions, Traditional Chinese Medicine for Cats and Dogs” used with permission of Dr. Cheryl Schwartz)



Your Cat Faeries’ Lamb Sweetbreads Recipie

Lamb sweetbreads are the pancreas and thymus of young sheep and they are one of the most nutrient dense foods there is. You only want to buy them from organic/pastured sources. To find them in your state: www.eatwild.com

  • Soak a pound or so of sweet breads in cold water for two hours
  • You might rinse them a few times during their soak
  • Strain in a colander in the sink
  • You want to pull off the big chunky fat pieces – the reason is that this fat isn’t delicious, it can be bitter, and the tough texture clashes with the dumpling like texture of the sweet breads
  • Try to remove some of the membrane without tearing or compromising the shape of the sweet breads
  • Cut them into uniform sizes so that they cook evenly. About 1 and a half inch pieces.
  • Par boil in gently boiling water for 5 minutes and drain

IF SERVING TO CATS – STOP HERE! The seasonings which are good and healthful to us are not good for cats (onion especially)

Continue on only for people…

  • Melt a lot of butter in a pan
  • Add some white wine and stir vigorously to make a slight reduction
  • Seasonings can include salt and pepper, a pinch of cumin powder, onion powder (organic and delicious onion powder can be bought at Azure Farms online)
  • Add the sweet breads
  • Simmer for 20 to 25 minutes. Interestingly, they do not dry out, yet if they are undercooked the texture isn’t very nice.
    At this point you can remove them and do a thicker white wine and butter deduction sauce by adding more of both, and stirring vigorously
  • You could even put some heavy cream in at this point or a bit of soft goat cheese
  • Put the sweetbreads back in the pan so the flavors marry with the sauce
  • Some people fry up the fat bits and have them separately
  • Leftovers are so good that they are even good cold!
  • You might experiment with adding cooked sausage and mushrooms

GMO Frankensalmon – soon to be in your cat’s food? Believe it!

The battle for safe food for ourselves and our fur family is never ending. And now the sneaky FDA approved of GMO (genetically modified organism) salmon. And as you know from the crazy defeat of California’s Proposition 37, manufacturers are not required to label GMO foods as such. It defies logic how anyone could be against knowing what they are eating.

Well, Cat Faeries cares. We care about you and we care about your cats. This article does not discuss cat food and GMO salmon (or other GMO’s) but it’s a good read to get you familiar with the reasons why this is so wrong. If they want to feed it to us, then of course they want to feed it to your cats.

http://www.rodale.com/genetically-modified-salmon-0

Coming soon in The Cat Faeries Companion:

Why we do not eat fish of any kind, ever, including sea salt, sea weed, and fish oil.

Why we don’t like grain of any kind, ever.

2013 list of Susan Thixton approved cat food – get your copy, we got ours!

Susan Thixton is a cat/dog food advocate who we’ve written about several times. Her newsletter is something everyone should subscribe to and read.

She’s presented a list of foods she would feed to her own animals. You must make a donation and buy the list. Why? Because this gal works really hard for us, and she deserves to be compensated.

Here’s how to buy her 2013 list of foods:

http://truthaboutpetfood2.com/the-2013-list