A question from a customer about Convivial House Cat and a cat with cancer

Hi Cat Faeries,

I have a question about your new product Convivial House Cat. We have two cats Woody and Cleo.. Woody lately has been more aggressive towards Cleo, especially around feeding time. He keeps jumping on her, etc. Cleo is also being treated for Cancer (doing very well right now) and is taking the chemo drug Chlorambucil and also Prednisolone by pill. My question: Is there any active ingredient in Convivial which might cause any adverse effects on Cleo?

L. and T.


Dear L. and T.

Thank you for writing! I’m sorry you are dealing with a cancer – not easy. But it sounds like she is doing well and we are very happy to know that.

There isn’t anything about Convivial House Cat that could or would conflict. If anything, everyone will be happier and that means everyone is healthier. It should help Woody not be so panicked about Cleo being sick.

Convivial House Cat is versatile . . . you can add it their food/water, but if you have any hesitation, spray it around the house.

I’m thinking that Woody is responding to Cleo’s health. You’ve probably read about those cancer sniffing dogs. Cats also smell things like cancer or other illnesses. Have you noticed that when you are on medication, especially if it’s strong, or you are around a person who’s on medication, you can smell something unusual? I think he’s smelling things which he doesn’t understand and he’s responding in a negative way – which is understandable.

Why not feed one of them in a separate room, with the door shut. Let them eat (give them 30 minutes or so) then collect the food bowls. Feeding them separately brings down the tension level, dramatically. If that’s not practical for your home then move the bowls as far apart as you can.

Wiping Cleo down with baby wipes might help move some of the odor Woody could be smelling.

I’m working on tomorrow’s newsletter which is about feeding our cats coconut oil. One of its benefits is that it can prevent some cancers. I hope you enjoy the article. Keep me posted about how the cats do, especially if you decide to try a bottle of Convivial House Cat.

Best wishes to all !!

Cat Faeries

When Should Your Cat See an Eye Doctor?

A cat’s eyes view the world with razor sharp detail and precision, and generally a healthy cat will have good vision for all 9 lives. But things can cause loss of vision and it’s best to know what can go wrong, how it can go wrong, and where to seek out the best help. A veterinary eye specialist who has extra diagnostic skills would be your cat’s new best friend.

Cat Faeries trusty feline friend Newton gives us the cat’s eye view of feline vision health, and the medical conditions which can affect it.


Newton’s Purrspective – When Should Your Cat See an Eye Doctor?

Have you ever taken your cat to an eye doctor?

Most people assume cats have nearly perfect vision. In reality their visual acuity is in the range of 20/100 to 20/200. This means that what a cat can see at 20 feet a person can see at 100-200 feet. Of course, we do excel at night vision, needing only 1/6 the amount of light a human would need. http://www.businessinsider.com/pictures-of-how-cats-see-the-world-2013-10 Being nearsighted is no handicap for us at all. The real problem is the eye diseases cats get, some of which can lead to permanent blindness.


Isaac Newton

The most frequently diagnosed ailment is conjunctivitis, an inflammation of the mucous membranes around the eye. It is highly contagious, but curable if treated promptly. Your veterinarian may prescribe antibiotic eye drops or ointment. In addition, you may wish to supplement this with a holistic remedy such as Colloidal Defense, which has many immune system benefits beyond helping eyes heal. Cats also need a calm environment to recover from any illness and to remain healthy. I have four feline siblings and I don’t know what we would do without Convivial Housecat and the Ball of Twine CD. (People enjoy this music too!)

More serious eye conditions include:

An ocular discharge or pawing at the eye are clear signs that professional help is needed as soon as possible. A scratched cornea from rough play is very painful! However, some problems have no obvious symptoms and can only be diagnosed with special instruments such as an ophthalmoscope. When Kitty has an exam your vet will evaluate both eye condition and overall health. (An eye problem can be related to other health issues.) You may then be referred to a veterinary ophthalmologist for additional diagnostics and care.

Cataracts are visible as a cloudiness in the center of the eye. Left untreated they can lead to glaucoma. http://www.veterinaryeyeinstitute.com/cataract-surgery/

Symptoms of glaucoma include pain and swelling of the eyeball. Blindness occurs rapidly if the pressure inside the eye is not reduced. Medications to relieve pain and reduce pressure will be prescribed, but in some cases surgery may be needed. http://www.vcahospitals.com/main/pet-health-information/article/animal-health/glaucoma-in-cats/3938

Uveitis has variable symptoms including squinting, light sensitivity, tearing and discoloration of the eye. http://animaleyecare.net/diseases/uveitis/ The cause, though often difficult to determine, is usually trauma, infection or cancer. The chosen treatment will depend on the probable cause. If glaucoma is also present this MUST be treated as well. Immune system support is vital. (Colloidal Defense helps support the immune system.)

Melanomas are the most common eye tumors in cats. Usually areas of increased pigmentation are visible. However, please note that not all increased pigmentation is pathological – discoloration is often benign. My sister, Tommy Lee Jones, has “iris freckles” in one eye. Don’t take chances with your cat’s eyes. Only a trained professional can make a diagnosis. http://veterinaryvision.com/for-veterinarians/clinical-forum/specific-disease-topics/feline-ophthalmology/

The most common diseases leading to blindness are:

  • uveitis (may be associated with infection or trauma)
  • retinal detachment (often associated with high blood pressure due to hyperthyroidism)
  • trauma (provide a safe environment and trim toenails to decrease risk)

http://www.vet.cornell.edu/fhc/health_information/vision.cfm

An eye exam should be part of your cat’s regular veterinary checkup, as well as blood tests for hyperthyroidism in senior cats. However, if you suspect any problems with your cat’s eyes please seek professional help as soon as possible. Prompt treatment may save Kitty’s sight.

It’s not a dream, cats can get along!

Sometimes we get lucky and have a multi cat household of cohesive convivial cats who get along, even adore each other often laying in piles grooming each other into a blissful state. Then there’s everyone else! For those homes which aren’t so lucky we’ve got the goods to calm down those feisty felines or that one cat who thinks that the others are worthy of their wrath! We’ll help you create or restore peace and harmony.

Little things you can do:

  • Space food bowls far apart. Carnivores can get territorial and possessive over their food bowls
  • If you can, allow individual cats to have their own room (like a bedroom) to dine in. This works when you feed two meals a day with the door closed for a half hour.
  • Soft music and other noises in the home work wonders. While you are gone during the day classical music soothes the nerves and activates parts of the brain which calm body, mind and spirit.
  • When you see a fight or tiff about to begin – no yelling, simply distract them. You might pick one up and move to another room, you might walk between them, you might engage them in play.
  • Keeping a clean litter box is vital. When the smells of urine or feces get too strong feline fighting can break out.
  • Have enough toys so that the more assertive cats don’t hog them all!

It’s not a dream beyond your reach. Convivial house cats are in your near future because you’ve got Cat Faeries in your back pocket. We’ve spent many years crafting just the right products to turn cats into buddies and besties!

Convivial House Cat is something we are extremely proud of. The customer feedback often moves us to tears because they are so delighted about what it’s done for their cats and their home.

Convivial House Cat is totally versatile – it can go into food and water. It can be sprayed around the house.

To compliment Convivial House Cat by fine tuning and zeroing in on specific problems or difficulties you are seeing with your cats we have our famous flower essence formulas crafted for the psyche and emotions of the modern house cat.

Multi Cat Household – helps pull the cats together to experience the family bond, the friendship bond. Lessens tensions in homes that might not be big and spacious. They’ll even like their human housemates better!

From Bully to Buddy – some cats just love to boss everyone else around. They might pick on a cat (or other animal) whose personality and temperament is soft, gentle and timid. There’s not much worse than seeing one cat stalk another. Let’s take that bully cat and see a new cat that’s at least tolerant and friendly!

Territorial Rescue – ok kitty, you will soon discover that not everything is “MINE MINE MINE”! Share! Don’t be so hot and bothered because there are others around in the house and outside of the house!

Calm and Serene – it’s like a yoga session in a bottle!

Crystals – placed around the house, by the food and water bowls, in and around beds spread around happy vibes! And that’s not all, you can spray Convivial House Cat on them, you can put drops of a flower essence formula on them and they’ll beam the healing energy to where it needs to go – right to those testy or nervous pocket tigers!

A Ball of Twine – original compositions and melodies created to soothe a cat’s nerves – and yours. Lovely music, lullabies for the brain and soul.

Cats and Lyme Disease – Birds can be carriers of ticks

We’ve all heard of the zillions of reasons to keep cats inside a loving home as a means of protecting them from various feline specific diseases and assaults from humans, cars, and bikes. But here’s another very important reason for keeping our cats indoors: Lyme Disease.

Outside cats often catch birds. Recently we learned that birds can be carriers for ticks and Lyme Disease. The bird that Fluffy proudly drops on your pillow or on the doorstep could have multiple ticks. Those loathsome parasites look for a new host when the bird dies. This host could be your cat, it could be you.

http://www.hiltonpond.org/ArticleBirdTicksMain.html

How many readers suffer from Lyme disease or know people who are? And how many of those people showed horrible symptoms before the disease was diagnosed and treated? We won’t go into that aspect we just want you to be aware that if your cat goes outside Lyme Disease is added to the list of reasons to keep kitty inside.

Ticks are not just found on deer. Lyme disease carrying ticks can be found on other animals including:

  • Dogs
  • Other Cats
  • Birds
  • Mice and other wild rodents
  • Rabbits
  • Possums
  • Raccoons
  • Horses
  • Cattle

Ticks are spreading like wildfire and so is Lyme disease. This article talks about how Climate Change is a tick’s best friend and another reason why global heating is our enemy.

http://grist.org/list/ticks-are-spreading-and-so-is-lyme-disease/

Symptoms of Lyme Disease for cats:

  • Many cats do not show symptoms – a vet’s exam would detect ticks on the cat’s body
  • Lameness of the limbs from inflammation
  • Acute lameness which lasts for a few days, generally three or four days, but can reoccur
  • The lameness can show up in one leg, then move to another leg
  • Kidney problems: be on the lookout for vomiting, less appetite, diarrhea, weight loss, increased urination, thirst, and bloating of the stomach area
  • Stiff walk with an arched back
  • Sensitive to touch
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Fever
  • Swollen lymph nodes
  • Rare: heart abnormalities and nervous system complications

If your cat or you develop Lyme disease you’ll want a protocol from the veterinarian or MD. Along with their treatment Colloidal Defense can be an ally in killing Lyme Disease. You would use it 3 or 4 times per day. We are told that the most important time of day is to take it at night, right before bed. It’s also important to take it on an empty stomach. You may also apply it topically.

How to Prevent Feline Calicivirus (FCV) Infection

Here’s an article from our resident smart kitty Issac Newton about Feline Calicivirus (FCV). It’s a particularly nasty virus that is one of the leading causes of feline upper respiratory infections and can cause painful ulcers on the nose, eyes and mouth.


We’ve seen Colloidal Defense help cats get through a bout of Calicivirus much more quickly. If your cats have ever had Calicivirus it’s a good idea to put Colloidal Defense in either their food or water daily as a prevention.


To see just how nasty the painful oowies that accompany this disease can be, one of the links below has photos which show what can happen to a cat’s nose, mouth and eyes (there is a warning with the link). These are graphic and not suitable for children or sensitive adults. Fortunately, not every outbreak of Calicivirus is as dramatic as shown in these photos.


Newton’s Purrspective – Calicivirus

Because their immune systems are not well developed kittens everywhere are at high risk for the most common feline viral diseases (upper respiratory disease and distemper). The stress of living in a shelter makes them even more susceptible and the proximity of other cats almost guarantees that they will get sick. The most common causes of upper respiratory infections in cats and kittens are herpesvirus and calicivirus. I was once a shelter kitten and I am a calicivirus survivor.


Isaac Newton

Calicivirus is highly contagious and can be spread through direct contact with infectious secretions (did you know a cat sneeze can travel 9 feet?) or by exposure to objects that have been contaminated (dishes, bedding etc.). The virus can survive a week or more in the environment so a person can spread the virus simply by touching these objects before handling a cat. (http://www.vcahospitals.com/main/pet-health-information/article/animal-health/feline-calicivirus-infection/4132)

Typically the incubation period is 2-6 days. However, a cat may infect others even before the disease is apparent! Symptoms are variable and depend on the age of the cat as well as the presence of other viruses, such as herpesvirus or distemper. These include:

  • Limping due to tenderness in the joints or muscles (most common in kittens)
  • Fever
  • Loss of appetite
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Sneezing and Discharge from the eyes and nose
  • Ulcerations (pus-filled sores) inside the mouth or on the lips, or tip of the nose
  • Ulcerations on the toes and bottom of the feet

(http://www.healthcommunities.com/calicivirus/symptoms.shtml)

The ulcers are very painful so drooling or pawing at the mouth may indicate their presence before they are readily visible.

Vaccination against calicivirus does not provide immunity, but it can decrease the severity of symptoms. (http://www.sheltermedicine.com/node/38#vacswarning – graphic pictures on this page of nose, eye and mouth ulcers – not suitable for children or sensitive adults) Since upper respiratory diseases are viral support therapy is used until the body can fight off the illness. Cats are typically treated with antibiotics to prevent pneumonia and other secondary bacterial infections. In severe cases fluids may be required. Fortunately, my symptoms were not severe and I had a foster mom to take care of me away from the shelter.

Calicivirus can be very serious, especially in kittens. It is important to get veterinary help as soon as possible. Traditional vets will use oral antibiotics and fluid therapy for rehydration if needed. Antibiotic eye ointment may also be prescribed to prevent ulceration and possible blindness.

Homeopathic vets will offer different treatment options. These include vitamins, herbs and nutraceuticals (http://www.news-medical.net/health/What-are-Nutraceuticals.aspx) to help support the immune system. “Colloidal Defense”, in particular, can stimulate the immune system and speed healing. A vaporizer may ease breathing difficulties and appetite stimulants can help if the patient is reluctant to eat. (http://allnaturalpetcare.com/blog/2014/03/21/natural-treatment-feline-upper-respiratory-tract-infection/). A nosode (homeopathic vaccine) may also be recommended. (http://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/veterinary-nosodes/)

In all cases good nursing (e.g. cleaning discharge from eyes and nose, providing fresh food/water and a warm safe place to sleep) is essential.

Although calicivirus outbreaks are most common in crowded situations, such as shelters or catteries, an indoor cat at home can still get the disease. Hand washing is an important precaution both for humans and their kitties! In the case of known infections it is best not to visit homes with sick cats for at least 2-3 weeks after they have recovered. Caretakers of sick cats should not visit other homes with cats.

After I finished my antibiotics I went in for my final exam at the shelter. I felt pretty good, but the veterinarian said I was unadoptable! Why?!? Some cats become carriers after recovering from the disease. (http://www.sheltermedicine.com/node/38#disinfectwarning – graphic pictures on this page of nose, eye and mouth ulcers – not suitable for children or sensitive adults) This means they could still potentially infect others. The virus is most likely to become active under stressful situations. Fortunately for me, my foster mom was willing to take the risk. At home we have minimal stress thanks to “Multi Cat Household Harmony Flower Essences” and “Convivial House Cat” spray. We have all remained healthy since my adoption over 7 years ago.

You can see why my mom fell in love with me.


Baby Newton Jan 2008

Anti Icky Poo Spring Cleaning Tips!

Here are some creative Spring Cleaning methods you can use Anti Icky Poo for:


Dump the litter in the litter boxes, pour in ¼ to ½ cup of Anti Icky Poo and enough cool water to cover the bottom. Let the enzymes and specially bred bacteria gobble up the icky crud at the bottom of the box and in its corners. Spray Anti Icky Poo on the sides of the box and the floor beneath it. You might also spray some on the walls around the litter box to remove dust and powders and any “back splash.” Your cats will be ecstatic with everything so sparkling clean.


If you have soiled gym clothes, play or work clothes that you thought might be past the point of no return, Anti Icky Poo renews their life by getting the funky stains and odors out. Put ¼ to 1/2 cup of Anti Icky Poo in a washing machine half way full of cold water (remember to test for color safety in a small unseen spot first). For small pieces (like a dress) you might want to soak overnight in a tub. Soaking your clothes for 12 hours or overnight will work miracles!


Recently Madam Cat Faerie spilled melted butter and pan drippings all down a fragile cotton dress. There were countless spots and the oils saturated the dress to the point where she thought it was hopeless. Soaking it in a tub over night with Anti Icky Poo and enough water to spread the cleaner enough to penetrate the fibers took every last trace of it out. Not one brown or yellow spot can be found!


Even if your cat has never peed on a pillow our evening sweat and body odors can make a pillow not so pleasant. First thing in a morning when you’ll be home all day remove and wash the pillow case. Hang up the pillow on a clothes rack or line with clothes pins. Give the pillow a light misting of Anti Icky Poo on all sides. Repeat this every hour for about 6 hours. Then allow to dry.


You can also do this with your mattress and sofa cushions. Remove the mattress and cushions, then tilt them against a wall. Spray it on all sides lightly once an hour for 6 hours. Then allow it to dry before replacing it to the bed.


Is the carpet feeling and smelling a bit funky? Anti Icky Poo works great in a carpet cleaning machine (which you can rent if you don’t own one). You can also give the give your rugs a light misting, hourly, over the course of a few hours.


Take a fresh quart of Anti Icky Poo and go to every room with a drain. Pour ¼ to ½ cup down each drain. Let it be for at least one hour. The enzymes are going to eat up the soap scum and grease! Chomp Chomp! It can’t eat through hair, but the other crud will be gone and that will save you oodles of money on plumbers! We don’t even remember the last time we needed to call in a plumber because of Anti Icky Poo’s safe, nontoxic, non-corrosive, and totally natural drain cleaning abilities!