An interesting article from Tufts University about anesthesia for cats and other animals.

This is a truly wonderful article and it covers everything you need to know, everything you’ve wondered about with the entire process of anesthesia – and not just for cats. It covers dogs and exotics like rabbits and guinea pigs. They focus of why we should not hold off on getting our animals teeth cleaned or other dental procedures out of fear of anesthesia. Sure, something could go wrong but with the huge advances it doesn’t happen as often as it did in the past. You’ll learn what should be done for your furry friend and will be able to ask just the right questions to your veterinarian to ensure that all goes well. We think you’ll love this well written article.

http://now.tufts.edu/articles/pets-and-anesthesia

4 oz. sizes of Cat Faeries Flower Essences now back in stock!

After a too long of a hiatus the 4 oz. bottles of our flower essences formulas for cats are back in stock! Why the long wait? Well, you know how finicky we are about quality! We had a very hard time finding American made bottles (we won’t use the ones from China or Taiwan). At last! We found them! Thank you for patiently waiting!

Meet Lucy, the 39 year old UK cat

Meet Lucy, the 39 year old UK cat at CatFaeries.com

Lucy the cat is alive and well in the UK at 39 years! If she were a human she would be 173 years old! What’s Lucy’s secret? Love? Buckets of affection? Catnip? Could Lucy be part vampire?

Our oldest cat crossed the bridge at age 22. Another one at 20, a few at age 18, and a few around age 15 or 16.

When we posted this great article last week to our Facebook page we heard from many of our customers and friends who astonished us with how long many of their cats lived. Of course one person thought the story is a hoax. Well we don’t know, but isn’t it inspiring? We say, hats off to all of you for taking such good care of your cats!

Here’s the story about Lucy the 39 year old cat!

www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1344271/Can-Lucy-39-really-oldest-cat-world.html

To boost your cat’s longevity we’d like to suggest two of our flower essence formulas: Kidney Kitty (your cat is not too young to begin with this in the water bowl) and Elder Support, which will support the body’s functions during the aging process.

Lilies – Fleur Fatal for cats! And other toxic Spring flowers.

Spring is all about flowers and to most of us we look forward to seeing the flowers from bulbs. Tulips, daffodils, lilies. But if you live with cats Do Not Buy Them or bring them into your home. One tiny nibble on any part of the plant (leaves, flowers, pollen) can mean sudden death to a cat. Even drinking the water in the vase holding the flowers can cause death or serious illness.

This article talks about how sensitive cats are to all parts of lilies – not just the flowers and leaves, but the water they sit in, and pollen too if the particles get on your cat’s whiskers, feet or fur (this can be fatal).

http://www.noliliesforcats.com/site/view/169876_FAQ.pml

This a very sad but very informative story from the Daily Mail about what happens when a cat eats any part of a lily: The Valentine bouquet that killed my cats: Mother’s Day warning on lethal lilies

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2289569/The-Valentine-bouquet-killed-cats-Mothers-Day-warning-lethal-lilies.html#ixzz2uHABGTRC

This website has a very good list of plants which are toxic to cats.

http://www.earthclinic.com/Pets/poisonous_pla

How Torti became known as Torti Narcissus – The Miracle Cat

One Christmas a customer gave us some bulbs which she said to put in a vase with pebbles and water (very Martha Stewart!). The window sill in the bathroom seemed like the perfect place to put them.

One night Torti, our feisty little tortoiseshell, was sitting on the back of the sofa when she fell over as if fainting. Cats don’t “faint” like we can. We knew this was very serious so we rushed her to the emergency vet hospital.

An hour later she went into cardiac arrest 5 times, and 5 times the doctor defibrillated her. Mystified as why this was happening the vet contacting a colleague, a veterinary heart specialist in another state. The tension was intense. The attending nurses were crying because they had never seen a cat survive more than one episode of cardiac arrest let alone five in quick succession.

Torti survived a case of arrhythmia where something causes the heart to slow to a dangerous level which can lead to failure and death.

When things settled down the vet and the out of state specialist asked us if she could have ingested anything toxic in our home. Since we are greener than green and obsessed with being as toxin free as possible we were stumped. But we questioned everything in the house and office, and of course felt horribly guilty that we’d done something wrong. The next days were spent agonizing over what could have caused the arrhythmia.

Four days later when Torti was discharged and came home the first thing she did was trot into the bathroom, leap on top the sink, and make a bee-line for that vase. It was beginning to flower and we recognized them as Narcissus. I grabbed Torti and shut the door to keep her out. Using Google and the words: cats narcissus heart – there it was! That’s what caused Torti’s near death experience! Torti became known far and wide as Torti Narcissus – The Miracle Cat! Her photo is still on the refrigerator of one of the nurses who tended to her that night. The out of state specialist was so impressed with Torti’s survival and recovery that he flew in to meet her and examine her himself.

Torti had no lingering effects from her ordeal and she lived another 10 very happy years. Every time she went to the vet everyone wanted to see Torti Narcissus – The Miracle Cat.

Giving and Receiving Flowers

It sounds like we’ve put the kibosh on giving and receiving pretty flowers! It may feel like there isn’t much left. Don’t despair! Roses – you can’t go wrong with roses, especially when they are locally grown and not sprayed with pesticides.

Comfort Zone with Feliway to the rescue for urinating by the door!

Here’s an email from a customer whose cat is urinating by the door. And our response that tells how to use Cat Faeries products and other techniques to deal with it.


Dear Cat Faeries,

We have male & female cats. The male is 3 years old and neutered. He is accustomed to going out doors to urinate, however the weather is preventing him from doing that. He is urinating by the door. We have sprayed with a deterrent and he now moved to another area on the rug.

K.P.


Dear K.P.

Thank you for your order and your note to us in the Comments area of the order form. We thought we’d answer you in our newsletter as we suspect that you are not the only one this winter having this problem.

With regard to your order:

  1. You’ll use Comfort Zone with Feliway spray according to our instructions.
  2. Put the Comfort Zone with Feliway diffusers in the rooms in the house where he’s started to pee on the floor.
  3. Use Anti Icky Poo to remove the deterrent and urine off the walls and floors near that door. Then place a litter box there for his use until he can resume going outside. Anti Icky Poo literally eats the urine proteins and gases!
  4. Put a few drops of the flower essence formula in the communal water bowl each time you change it, or once or twice a day.

The deterrent you bought is doing its job – it has deterred your cat from peeing by that door and as you’ve learned the hard way your cat will find other places!

Deterrents are never a good idea and they could contain toxic ingredients. Feliway though is safe and when you follow the instructions that we’ll give you with your order you’ll learn how to use it so the cats don’t pick new naughty locations.

Now this is very important: normally we are very against putting boxes on top of or near all of the places where the cat is peeing. It’s best to create one roomy Kitty Latrine Area where there are a few hoodless litter boxes pushed together to create a large “sand box” with a bag of litter, a scooper, a trash can and a broom handy for your use. A latrine area concentrates the scent of feline urine/feces to one place which is which the cats seek out. If you put litter boxes in other rooms you are telling the cat that it’s ok to pee in all sorts of rooms! And your problem will get worse.

But K.P.’s situation is seasonal. So for the duration of this winter keep a box by the door. When things warm up and he can go outside it’s your choice to keep it there or remove it.

Some of you might take this cold winter as a chance to break your cat’s desire for and habit of going outside. After a few months of being inside cats often forget about going outside. We really feel that cats are healthiest staying indoors.