How To Save A Choking Cat

Generally cats are excellent at hacking up something that they might have swallowed. But sometimes the object or piece of food gets stuck in the throat and this can cause the cat’s airway to shut down and lead to death.

This illustrated step-by-step how-to will show you how to properly dislodge the object. You’ll be surprised that some of the techniques you might think will work, really don’t work and can cause more problems.

While you are trying to dislodge the object put a call into the vet’s office saying that you are probably coming in either for the cat to be looked after the object comes out or if you can’t get it out.

http://www.wikihow.com/Save-a-Choking-Cat

Learn CPR & First Aid For Cats (and Dogs)

Learn First Aid on cat and dog mannequins at the Red Cross

The best would be to take a class at your local American Red Cross. Here’s where to find a class near you. It will be a fun and very informative afternoon where you’ll learn to perform CPR on cat and dog mannequins and you’ll learn how to bandage and so much more. And did I tell you that it’s a lot of fun? It is fun and you’ll get to meet and chat with other animal people. You’ll walk out with a certificate and a bag of useful things like bandages and a guide book.

http://www.redcross.org/lp/cpr-classes?gclid=CJrn-7mJ3boCFSzZQgod8isAvQ

Here is a video from the Pets America if you can’t find a Red Cross class near you.

Something she doesn’t tell us is that we don’t breathe into an animal with as much force as we do for humans. Their lungs are much smaller than ours and can’t hold as much air as we can, so too hard of a breath from you can lead to other problems.

FDA Links Deaths to Jerky Pet Treats from China

Once again jerky treats which were made in China for dogs and cats are making animals sick or causing them to die. You must read labels carefully. Avoid food for your cat or dog that is made in China, Thailand or Vietnam. Often stores will cover up the country of origin with the price tag!

Here’s what the FDA says in its latest warning – “As of September 24, 2013, FDA has received more than 3000 complaints of illness related to consumption of chicken, duck, or sweet potato jerky treats, nearly all of which are imported from China. The reports involve more than 3600 dogs, 10 cats and include more than 580 deaths.”

Even if a product is made in the US they could be sourcing ingredients from anywhere – including China. And while I have your attention, read the labels, if there is fish on the ingredient list do not buy it – more on “why we no longer consume fish” in an upcoming newsletter.

Here’s two articles on the latest FDA warning:

http://www.cnn.com/2013/10/22/us/fda-jerky-pet-treats-warning/ – FDA to vets: Watch out for jerky pet treats; some linked to illness, death

http://truthaboutpetfood2.com/jerky-treat-progress-report – Jerky Treat Progress Report?

Here’s a link to the latest FDA warning:

http://www.fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary/NewsEvents/CVMUpdates/ucm371450.htm – FDA Releases Progress Report on Jerky Pet Treat Investigation

Why You Should Keep Your Black Cat Inside Around Halloween (it’s good to keep all cats inside, all the time)

On Halloween, Thursday October 31st 10% of our sales will be adopted to Loup Garou rescue an organization devoted to the rescue and adoption of black cats and dogs!

For more information: http://www.loupgarourescue.org/

Why You Should Keep Your Black Cat Inside Around Halloween (it’s good to keep all cats inside, all the time) at CatFaeries.com

Here’s an article written by Loup Garou founder Jennifer Mieuli Jameson:


Halloween…my very favorite holiday of the year! Children dressed up as goblins and ghosts traveling door to door like scary salesmen, only they expect to be GIVEN something: a trick, or a TREAT! Treats are more popular these days, much to the chagrin of the parents whose little ones will be hopped up on sugar for days to come after the annual spookfest!

While it’s all fun and frolic for humans, this particular holiday can be difficult for our pets, and most especially for black cats. Long associated with witches and evil, every year at this time, we hear the warnings: shelters won’t adopt out black or orange cats at this time of year, or “keep your felines confined to the indoors, lest they meet with a terrible fate.” There is a risk, to be sure, but more of a risk is that your cat might be met with mischief perpetrated by Halloween pranksters. But the incidence of cats being sacrificed to so-called Satanic ritual is less actuality and more urban myth. While there are some reported cases, there are more times when our sleek black beauties are the victim of rambunctious Halloween revelers.

To be on the safe side, keep your kitty indoors. That way, the only peril he or she will face is the constant ringing of the doorbell as the Night of All Hallows is celebrated~!

Are behavior modification drugs right for your cat? Do they really work?

Here’s an article by guest cat-tributor Issac Newton:


I’ve been asked how I feel about behavior modification drugs prescribed for cats. First, I must admit that I do partake in a little ‘nip on occasion. But that’s just for fun and the effect is short term. Shouldn’t we think very carefully before using drugs that could not only affect personality, but also have adverse side effects?

The ASPCA has published a good overview of behavioral medications used in cats. http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/virtual-pet-behaviorist/cat-behavior/behavioral-medications-cats


Typical behavior problems include timidity/aggression, litter box avoidance, urine marking and compulsive behavior (e.g. excessive grooming leading to hair loss).

Before asking for a “magic pill” cat parents should carefully assess the home situation. The following includes some of the questions to answer:

  1. How many cats live in the household?
  2. How many of these cats are exhibiting behavioral problems?
  3. Are litter boxes and private spaces sufficient and strategically placed? Sometimes cats just need a place of their own to chill out.
  4. Have there been significant changes in the environment? (e.g. new pets, children, furniture etc.)

Armed with this assessment the cat parent is better equipped to take Kitty to the vet for a complete physical. Cats generally hide their illnesses well, but if the environment hasn’t been altered a behavioral change may very well be due to some physical cause.

If no physical problems are detected the first course of action should be to try a natural solution such as Feliway, calming music, or flower essences. Your veterinarian might also prescribe a food containing amino acids that reduce anxiety. (Please give any of these methods at least a month before making conclusions regarding their effectiveness.) However, if the problem(s) persist the next step would be a consultation with an expert in animal behavior. The veterinary specialist should visit your home to see Kitty’s behavior in her own environment.

(Cat Faeries’ note – Feliway, calming music, and flower essences are available at CatFaeries.com)

After exhausting all of the options above the veterinary behaviorist may want to try a prescription drug. There are four classes of medications that may be used depending on the problem behavior. As with human medications, positive results are not guaranteed and there are many potential side effects. Be sure you are aware of these and know what to do should they occur. Also ask if any foods are contraindicated while taking the medication.

Oh, did I mention that these medications must be given daily? Is Kitty suffering from anxiety? Imagine how she will feel about taking a pill every day. (I know how I would feel about it!) However, many drugs are now available as flavored “treats” or in transdermal gels. This alleviates the stress for everyone, but consistency is vital.

As a cat I think I can safely say that we would all prefer to “just say no to drugs”. However, if they must be used please keep us safe with regular veterinary checkups and blood tests as required.

Cat Faeries’ flower essences for cats and crystals on sale at 10% off!


Get 10% off Golden Healer crystals and Cat Faeries’ own handcrafted flower essences for cats through November 1st. No coupon code required – the savings are right on the website.

Cat Faeries’ flower essences for cats are professionally crafted for cats taking into consideration their collective consciousness and doing our best to get into the minds of our feline friends. Our golden healer crystals are quartz crystals which grew near Iron Hydrate tinting them with varying shades of golden yellow to orange and thus amplifying their healing power.