You can’t know too much about Anti Icky Poo! A Q&A.

Here is an interesting Q & A between Cat Faeries and a customer which we think you’d like to read. We’ve edited it a bit here and there.

Question: For clean up, I have used vinegar with water spray. A “natural” spray cleaner from a conglomerate chain store. I’ve also used ammonia in a spray bottle.

Answer: OH NO! Ammonia is the worst! And this is why: Cat urine, in fact all urine from any species, has an ammonia like quality. Our housecats instinctively seek out the smell of ammonia, which ideally is only detected in the litter boxes. This tells the cat: “it’s ok to pee here! This is where we cats are to urinate.”

What you accidently did was spread the smell of ammonia around your home! But don’t feel bad or beat yourself up, today is a new day, we begin anew! We will conquer this problem together!

Vinegar does nothing other than in the short run it’s nice to clean up a fresh puddle. But it will not eradicate the smell or the urine proteins and gases, or that ammonia.

That’s why it’s imperative to use a product like Anti Icky Poo which does not mask the odor, but actually eats urine’s proteins and gases, thus eradicating it completely.

Q: The peeing and spraying is happening in living room, kitchen, dining area, pantry, and porch. A few spots in each room- example, the fire hearth, in front of refrigerator door, by dog treat bin in pantry, on treadmill. Since I’ve got cat urine all over my home, and I’ve probably put the smell of ammonia throughout my house too, what can I do?

A: Do you recall how in your Feliway handout we talk about using it in each room “here and there”?
You are going to do something similar with Anti Icky Poo – PLUS – use it on the spots that you know have been hit. These are methods that we created based on our many years of experience.

The reason for Here and There with Anti Icky Poo is that when we suspect that there is urine in places you don’t know about we want to cover our bases.

When a cat sprays they do one of two things:

  • They empty their tank on one surface or wall
  • They can spray little drops or a fine mist on multiple things to claim the entire house or garden as IT”S MINE! Therefore it could be worse than your nose tells you.

Go through your home with your bottle of Anti Icky Poo with the sprayer intact. Approach a variety of surfaces and objects and give a fine baby misting of Anti Icky Poo “here and there.” Do this for a few days. After a few days this should de-stink and allow you to reclaim your home!

Q: They both used the litter boxes until old cat passed, and now young female won’t always let other old male on the porch to use litter boxes.

A: When an older cat dies it’s always best to get new litter boxes. There could be lingering smells. A good example is the awful smell of impending death when an old cat is ready to pass. This can freak out any remaining animals “I could be next!” And this can be the trigger for spraying or not urinating in a litter box.

A point we always like to make about why we don’t like having multiple litter boxes throughout a house, particularly a smaller house. When boxes are scattered throughout a house the smell of ammonia is in every room that a box is in. This tells the cat it’s ok to deposit urine in multiple rooms, and the sight of litter boxes everywhere and the odor cannot be pleasant for you! Cats don’t avoid their litter box because they are too lazy to walk over to where the boxes are.

Q: The flooring of our home is completely tiled and they have urinated on it.

A: You are very lucky to have such wonderful floors! My dad was a tile setter so I grew up with tile floors. Urine can penetrate the grout especially if it’s modern grout as opposed to 1960’s grout which was indestructible. Probably a few days of treating the tile with Anti Icky Poo will eradicate any urine which may have penetrated the tiles or grout.

Q: I was confusing the flower essences for essential oils – sorry! How many drops per gallon of water? We change the water twice a day, but we need to use big water bowl because big dog drinks a lot.

A: Most people have smaller water bowls and we suggest 3 to 5 drops. For your big bowl start with 5 drops for the gallon. You may need a few more drops. In addition to adding drops to the water bowl rub some on her head, ears, back when you have the time.

Shocking Tests Reveal Toxins in Cat & Dog Food

For several months we’ve been on pins and needles awaiting the results of the findings from 12 very well known brands of cat and dog foods, including a few so-called prescription foods. These are all brands you’ve heard of, and some of them are brands many assume are the good ones for our cats.

The testing was sponsored by and paid for by the members of the Association for Truth in Pet Food (ATPF), in other words, concerned consumers like you and me who donated money to fund this project. ATPF was founded by pet food advocate Susan Thixton.

The qualifications of the people running the tests include: veterinary nutritionists and forensic scientists.

Does the word “Mycotoxin” scare you? Us too! The foods tested had varying levels of Mycotoxins in them.

Have you heard of group of bacteria called Acinetobacter? We learned that this bacteria is responsible for approximately 500 human deaths a year. You will see that this bacteria was found in 8 of the 12 pet foods tested! And it gets worse: for humans Acinetobacter is 63% multi drug resistant. We are going to wonder out loud for a moment: could some of these human deaths be linked to the handling or eating tainted cat/dog food?

If it’s a threat to human health then why are these toxins ending up in cat and dog food?

Read more:

http://cid.oxfordjournals.org/content/46/8/1254.full

http://www.cdc.gov/HAI/organisms/acinetobacter.html

We are paying the FDA and state department of agriculture One Billion Dollars annually nationwide to conduct testing yet they claim they don’t have enough money to test for toxins in cat and dog food!

Susan Thixton from ATPF will attempt to meet with the FDA in a week to challenge them on these topics and more. If she’s successful we’ll report back to you with the outcome.

Angry? Here’s what you can do today. Call and write to your Congresspersons. Call and write to officials at the local level. If we do not demand change, insist that laws be put in place, and force better enforcement of those laws nothing will improve. Don’t just contact the manufacturers – they may only change if laws which make this illegal are in place.

The test results which you are going to see should embarrass the regulatory officials because it proves that they are not doing their jobs.

This link will take you the very lengthy and disturbing test results.

http://truthaboutpetfood.com/the-pet-food-test-results/

Avoid these indoor holiday plants that are potentially lethal to cats!

Poinsettias, mistletoe and lilies – these are but a few of the indoor house plants that are toxic to cats! Here’s a complete list of cat-unfriendly houseplants.

http://user.xmission.com/~emailbox/plants.htm

Bringing flowers to a home with cats? Roses are a good choice BUT they should be grown locally, and better yet, they should be grown organically!

Why is organic important? Most roses sold in the U.S. come from Colombia or Ecuador where they are grown in greenhouses which use a shocking amount of pesticides.

Read more about the toxins in Colombian and Ecuadoran roses here:

http://www.organicbouquet.com/i_504/msnbc-article-roses.html

Where to find organic or fair trade flowers:

Newton’s purr-spective on pilling a cat

Two weeks ago we wrote a story about alternatives to pilling our cats. If you missed that article, here is it is – Non-pill medication for cats from Koshland Pharm, the compounding pharmacy we endorse.

Our contributor, Newton, is a very smart cat and always has something to say. This is a topic near and dear to his kitty-heart! Here’s what Newton has to say about medication.



Newton’s Purr-spective – Medications



Let’s start this column with a quick survey for you cats. Here’s the situation. You go to the vet and the doctor prescribes medication. Choose from the following:

A. a pill
B. a capsule
C. a liquid
D. an injection
E. something else please!!!

I know you all skipped to E, and I don’t blame you. In fact, I’m a huge fan of “something else” – compounding pharmacies that make medicine easier to take. I know I look very cool, but I do stress out when it comes to pills. Cat Faeries recently posted an excellent article which includes the benefits of compounded medication plus a guide to choosing the right compounding pharmacy. http://www.catfaeries.com/blog/non-pill-medication-for-cats-from-koshland-pharm-the-compounding-pharmacy-we-endorse/
Although the list of available medications is growing, not all prescriptions can, or should be compounded. http://www.catfaeries.com/images/newsletter/2014-11-18/Veterinary-Transdermal-Medications-IJPC.pdf

I can testify that my flavored medication is quite tasty. But there are still those of us who are, and will remain, Finicky Felines. This group will likely face the first 4 options.

A. There are many jokes about “how to pill a cat” (usually pages long), but it is truly not a laughing matter. No matter what technique a pet parent uses there is one simple rule. The key to getting the pill into the cat is getting it on the back of the tongue so Kitty swallows, rather than spitting it out. Some people find that a “pill popper” is helpful, especially if they have large fingers. A subsequent dropper of water (plastic only!) will prevent the dry pill from getting stuck. Wrapping Kitty in a towel (aka the kitty burrito) can be calming and reduce injuries.

B. If a medication is particularly bad tasting it may come in a capsule. Here correct positioning on the tongue is even more important than with a pill. Muffin, a friend of mine, accidentally bit into a gelatin capsule of bitter medicine. To make matters worse, it got stuck on her tooth! Needless to say, this was a most unpleasant experience for all.

C. After a bad experience cats demonstrate that they have jaws of steel which will open for nothing. Pet parents may then choose liquid medication. The important requirement is to get the dropper inside the cat’s cheek and administer slowly enough to give Kitty time to swallow. However, can someone please tell me who decided cats are partial to banana or bubblegum flavored antibiotics? My older brother, Indiana Jones, would gag just at the sight of the bottle! Right now I only know of one common cat friendly antibiotic liquid available directly from your veterinarian.

D. There is one injectable antibiotic popular for hard to medicate cats. OK, it involves a small needle – BUT – the shot lasts a full 2 weeks. It isn’t safe for everyone. The manufacturer cautions against use in patients with allergies to penicillins or cephalosporins. https://www.zoetisus.com/products/convenia/pages/convenia.aspx However, clinical trials documented the safety of Convenia in the general cat population. https://www.zoetisus.com/products/convenia/documents/convenia_pi.pdf Any drug has the possibility of causing adverse effects. Once the shot is given you can’t “take it back”. so this method should not be used without careful evaluation of alternatives.

What you choose will depend on availability and on the dosing frequency required. For example, deworming medication may be given only once (with a followup dose in 7-10 days), while antibiotics generally require a full 10-14 day regime. A single dose may be relatively easy to administer. But even a compliant cat may become weary after a week of twice a day medication. Life saving medication for chronic diseases (e.g. hyperthyroidism) involves other considerations. Transdermal methimazole for hyperthyroid cats is often the preferred treatment option.

Remember, the most important thing is your cat’s health. Work with your veterinarian to find the best method available for making sure Kitty gets the full benefit of prescribed medication.

Keeping cats calm during the holidays

Ah, this time of year can be a flurry of visitors, more activity than usual, cooking, cleaning, shopping, and so much more. Do yourself a favor, keep your cat calm which in turn will make you calmer because you aren’t worrying about your cat’s nerves or possible naughty behavior.

Here are our tips:

Company is coming! How to train your guests and visitors to be cat friendly!

We sure love our guests. It’s fun to plan for them, to feed and water them, and create new experiences and memories. Some cats love having new people around, they can thrive on it. But for other cats it’s a disaster! “Who are these people and why won’t they leave?!” Their noise can be upsetting, their smells can be unfamiliar, they might bring a dog or children and heaven forbid they might sit in the cat’s favorite chair! The last thing we want is a stressed out cat – this can lead to vomiting, not eating, being a bit aggressive, or the worst of the worst: litter box avoidance.

Tips for training house guests which will help keep kitty calm and allow you to be the perfect hostess who enjoys your guests.

  • Visitors should be asked to not approach your cats. Let the cat’s curiosity kick in so that if your cats want to be petted it will be asked for.
  • No rough housing! No vigorous petting unless that’s something your cat likes.
  • Give your visitors a favorite Cat Faeries catnip toy so they can interact with the cat. The cat will view your catnip toting guest as a friend!
  • This may sound nutty, but it works. Make the visitor endearing to your cat via sense of smell. A spray or two of our Cat Faerie Catnip Mist on clothing works wonders! You can also give a spray or two of Comfort Zone with Feliway to clothing or shoes. Really! This works!
  • If your cat likes to hide in a back room, let it be. If the cat wants to join the holiday festivities, it should happen when the cat wants it, and on the cat’s terms.
  • Show children how to play gently with the cat. Children should know to not bother a hiding, sleeping or eating cat. Loud exclamations like “THAT CAT IS SO CUTE!” can frighten a cat who’s not used to hearing loud voices.
  • If you’ve got several Comfort Zone with Feliway Diffusers, place them all in the room that your cat spends the most time in. The beauty of the diffusers is that you can move them around.
  • Don’t change the cat’s feeding times. Even a half hour can worry or upset a cat.

To help make your cat more comfortable during holidays, plug in a Comfort Zone with Feliway Diffuser a day or two in advance. The diffuser will last for four weeks (so you may need more than one to keep your cat comfortable through the festivities), and helps your cat adjust to a changing environment. Stress behavior (vertical scratching, urine spraying, etc.) is usually a result of stress, and using Comfort Zone products with Feliway can help keep your cat happy and your home safe. Feliway is used and recommended by veterinarians nationwide.

Cat Faeries recommends:

Comfort Zone with Feliway – DIFFUSER
Plug it in and forget about it (until 4 weeks later when it’s time to install another refill of the pheromone) Fills a 600 square foot room with the calming scent. You may need two per room which is a good idea especially this time of year.

The Spray
The Comfort Zone with Feliway Spray makes it easy for you to go from room to room and spot treat furniture and other surfaces putting the calming pheromone right on places that the cat likes to sit or rest. It will also deter urinating or spraying urine.

Calm and Serene Flower Essence Formula for Cats
A few drops of this magic liquid in the water bowl or in food works wonders to calm down a cat. You can also rub a few drops on ears and top of the cat’s head.

Moves and Changes Flower Essence Formula for Cats
This formula will be helpful if your visitors will be staying for awhile! Cats don’t like change, even if it’s Aunt Martha who’s occupying the spare room for a few weeks! Even moving furniture around for the holiday can upset an otherwise calm cat.

Calm and Serene and Moves and Changes are on sale!

They’ve been marked down on our website.

Non-pill medication for cats from Koshland Pharm, the compounding pharmacy we endorse

Who doesn’t have a book full of stories about trying to pill their cats! And scratch marks too! Some of us are just not great at getting a pill into their cat. Others of us worry that the handling of the cat when pilling adds to the stress of being sick – not to mention it stresses us out too!

Perhaps you already know about compounding pharmacies and that they can put medication for feline hyperthyroidism in gel form to be applied inside a cat’s ear. The good news is that many more medications can be compounded into a gel for application inside a cat’s ear.

The reason why a cat’s ear is a great location for transdermal drug application is that the skin there is very thin and the medication will absorb evenly and quickly. A cat’s ear has a lot of blood flow to carry to drug directly into the blood stream.

Another great option for cats would be to put the medication in a flavored mini-chew.

This link will take you to an article which will tell you the wide array of medication that can be compounded to put either into an ear gel or mini-chew.

Veterinary Transdermal Medications – International Journal of Pharmaceutical Compounding

Researching compounding pharmacies has told us that not just any compounding pharmacy will do. The ones which are exclusively for veterinary are surprisingly the worst choice as their standards, quality, and precise measuring of ingredient particle sizes can be lax. You’ll want to seek out a compounding pharmacy which also creates human medications.

But that said, you also want a compounding pharmacy that will guarantee that none of the ingredients contain xylitol. Xylitol is a sweetener that is safe for people, but lethal to cats and dogs. Koshland Pharm guarantees that their products for animals are xylitol free. They also will provide you with a Certificate of Analysis if you ask for it – which is not the case with every compounding pharmacy. And your cat faerie knows personally that their attention to detail and getting everything just right is stellar.

The size of the flavored mini-chew from Koshland is about the same size as a pencil eraser.

Custom flavors include:
– Tuna
– Fish
– Shrimp
– Bacon
– Beef

– Chicken
– Liver
– Protein free flavors are also available

Here are six questions to help you evaluate a compounding pharmacy. Not all compounding pharmacies have the highest quality or standards.

Peter Koshland, the owner of Koshland Pharm, welcomes your calls and he will graciously answer your questions.

Koshland Pharm: Custom Compounding Pharmacy
(p) 415-344-0600 (f) 415-344-0607
301 Folsom St., Suite B
San Francisco, CA 94105
www.koshlandpharm.com