Do cats get depressed? They do – how you can help.


(Bizarro is one of our favorite comic strips!)

 
 

The recent suicide of comic genius Robin Williams has gotten a lot people talking about depression and keeping a closer eye on friends and relations who suffer from depression. But what about our cats, do they sometimes get depressed?

Well, they do. Generally feline depression can be overcome fairly quickly. So many things can trigger it. A death in the family (and that can be family with two feet and no tail, or four feet and a tail) is a big one. Cats can mourn anywhere from a few hours or days, to weeks into months. Any big changes to the home can be a trigger. If your cat feels neglected depression can set in.

Many years ago when we brought Torti home, our other tortoiseshell cat Tasha, let out a cry that was more like a wail a heartbreaking sound that we’d never heard before or ever heard again. It was as if she thought she was being replaced with another cat that looked like her, but was younger. It took loving work, but Tasha snapped out of it a week later and the two girls became inseparable until they both crossed The Rainbow Bridge.

Here are some of the warning signs that Kitty is depressed:

  • Not eating at all or eating much less than usual is number one.
  • Not grooming is probably the second sign that something is wrong (either depression or illness)
  • Hiding. Not engaging with you or the other cats.
  • Your cat could start to sleep noticeably more.
  • Your cat could become very quiet, not meowing, or purring.
  • On the flip side of that your cat could start to yowl which is comparable to us sobbing.
  • Walking with tail and head down, whiskers seem to droop,
  • They may become aggressive towards you or others in the home. They might hiss or bite, or swat.
  • They might stop using the litter box for either pooping or peeing, perhaps even both.
  • The cat may use the litter box but might not bury their droppings.
  • Loss of interest in toys, and affection from you.

Here is how Cat Faeries can help you to help your depressed cat.

A Ball of Twine, a calming music CD created just for cats to be played while you are not at home. The composer has studied the effects of sound on the brain, heart, and cells of the body so this music is truly medicinal.

Comfort Zone with Feliway – Diffusers can be installed in the room or rooms that this cat spends the most time in. That pheromone was intended to stop cats from peeing outside of the box but when it was created in the late 1990’s it was discovered that it calms cats and snaps them out of funks.

Catnip Mist can be sprayed on your cat’s bedding or favorite resting or hiding places. Most cats find the aroma of catnip hard to resist!

Our flower essence formulas. So many good ones to choose from: Moves and Changes, Calm and Serene, Multi Cat Household, Past Abuse, Forget Me Not (for mourning). One formula can go into the food and/or water bowl while another one is lovingly massaged on the cat’s head and ears.

Cat Saved From California Wildfire – How You Can Help Save Cats Caught in Fires

A few years ago we posted an article about how you can help fire fighters save cats caught in fires by donating specially sized oxygen masks for animals (we’ve posted a link to that at the bottom.

Here’s a photo from our local newspaper featuring a fire in the town of Weed, in Northern California (you can imagine the jokes that town gets!) of a fireman holding a cat he found during the big wildfire several days ago, after one of many homes burnt.

The cat looks a lot like our Madeline who was born in that region and came from a shelter 40 miles away! A cousin? Maybe! A big salute to fire fighters!


(from Fast-moving wildfire ‘the most horrible thing’ to ever hit Weed at SFGate.com)

“That fire was coming in here pretty good,” said Zach Curren, a firefighter from Napa, who worked the blaze near Angel Valley Road. “But we managed to stop it right there,” he said, pointing to a long, white ranch home with a crew of firefighters spraying down a smoldering roof.

In his arms he held a gray cat he had just found hiding under a pile of clothes in a house across the street from the smoking home. The neighborhood was deserted except for fire crews, and as the whoosh of hoses and grinding of engines filled the air, the cat shivered.

“Poor thing’s scared to death,” Curren murmured. “A lot of people were, too.”


About two years ago we posted an article to our blog about how you can help firefighters help cats by donating specially sized oxygen masks for animals.



This photo is from a video that is an extremely moving collage of fire fighters rescuing cats from fires. The music is great! You’ll need much tissue!

You can watch all of the video on our blog post on the oxygen masks.

A customer of ours told us about Mara DiGrazia, a veterinarian on Long Island. “She has donated hundreds of animal-sized oxygen masks to numerous fire departments throughout Long Island so they can dispense oxygen properly to animals who are rescued from fires. Without those masks, sadly many beloved animals die even though firefighters heroically rescue them from the flames of the fire because they couldn’t receive life-saving oxygen properly. This is something that makes perfect sense yet I never thought about until I heard Mara was doing it.”

Here’s our blog post – Your local fire department needs specially sized oxygen masks for animals to save the lives of animals. How you can help!

Last year we donated two of these oxygen masks to our closest fire house. One is cat sized, and one is dog sized.

Here’s a link to where you can buy animal oxygen masks to donate to your local fire department – Wag’N O2 Fur Life® Program – The Pet Oxygen Mask Initiative

Vitalize your cat’s water with a VitaJuwel Gemstone Wand

We are beyond delighted to tell you that you can turn your cat’s water into something with better flavor and something that’s vibrantly healthy – VitaJuwel Gemstone Wands. We have found hand blown glass vials in the shape of a wand filled with gemstones to vitalize water. Each wand is 7 inches long.

In just 7 to 10 minutes in a water bowl or a drinking glass and you’ll have vitalized water imprinted with the healing properties of amethyst, garnet and lots of quartz crystals. The water will hold the imprint of the gemstones for 2 days!

When you place one of the wands in water it will have the same energetic quality and radiance of pure water from a free flowing spring – what a rare treat that is! The flavor is light and absolutely delicious. I’m not sure if I’m imagining this but my drinking water looks clearer.

You’ll get so much millage out of your wand. You can place it in your cat’s water bowl for 7 to 10 minutes, then remove it, rinse it off, and place it in a 6 to 8 ounce glass of water for yourself.

Masuro Emoto, who is famous for his books on water including The Hidden Messages of Water, tested these wands himself. Here you’ll see a photo of regular tap water – not pretty, actually downright ugly and scary! The photo next to it is a photo of water that was vitalized with a VitaJuwel vial/wand which is beautiful and healthy looking, a lovely snowflake!

More giddy excitement from Cat Faeries: We are the first flower essence producer work to with the VitaJuwel Gemstone Wands to enhance the water we use in every bottle of our flower essences thus taking our work and the effectiveness of our flower essences to new heights!

We’ve already begun using this enhanced water in our unique formulas for cats, and our single essences which allow you to create your own formulas. If you haven’t checked out our single flower essences they are listed below the cat formulas. You’ll get double-duty healing with our flower essences with vitalized water from VitaJuwel wands!

Who doesn’t want to see their cats and themselves live long and very healthy lives?

Cat Faeries are innovation leaders in all things healthy and natural, and we love taking you and your cats to a whole new level of health, longevity, and consciousness. Get your VitaJuwel Gemstone Wand today and transform your water!

Why do cats like to sneak into attics or basements and spray? Our advice & products to the rescue!

Dear Cat Faeries,

We have been letting our cats “play” in the attic area (for some reason, they really want to be in there), and have just discovered they have been doing more than playing in there.
:( Nasty!


Those naughty kitties! This isn’t surprising, but don’t be angry with them – get your hands on a few bottles of our Anti Icky Poo urine cleaner (on sale now) which will get rid of the urine and odor.

I feel the reason they do this is that the smells up there are intriguing, and they know you don’t go up there often. It’s similar with basements or garages, or crawl spaces. Also those rooms don’t always have the insulation that other rooms of your house have so smells from outside waft in. Sometimes what your cat smells are from animals who are traveling through your yard or garden (and doing their business there too).

Another reason they suddenly want to go into your attic is that you’ve got mice or rats. You’ve either got them now or you recently had them. The smells of their little bodies and nests, plus their droppings can lure cats to such rooms or spaces in the house. When your cat can access where mice or rats have been they like to pee on top of those odors.

You might set rodent traps. What will dictate the type of trap you buy will depend on your view of trapping mice. Some people like what’s known as a humane trap so they release the mice to a field. Other people want The Terminator Method. Because the Hanta Virus carried by mice scares me, we like The Rat Zapper which your local hardware store probably carries or can order for you. The Rat Zapper can be used indoors and outdoors.

When you set any type of traps make sure that the room/area is completely closed off to your cats, dogs, and children.

Here’s Cat Faeries fail-safe bait recipe for any type of trap:

1 cookie (it can be stale)
1 bit of peanut butter (“the glue” for the next two crucial components)
1 Macadamia nut (mice and rats cannot resist them)
1 small piece of black licorice (they adore this too)

Have you ever noticed your cats staring at heater vents? Or worse, peeing on them? The heat ducts in your home are highways for mice! And yes, you may pour Anti Icky Poo down a heater vent – it’s not flammable. Just turn off the heat for the day or few days you are treating it with Anti Icky Poo.

So now we have yet another reason to have Anti Icky Poo always on hand. If you don’t have any more why not order a few fresh bottles?

How to talk to your vet about tough subjects, part two of two

In part two we give you some phrases that you can use to approach your doctors with intelligence and a firm hand, while remaining respectful. It’s a tricky juggling act, but it can be done with great results for everyone including a doctor who could learn a new trick, from you! (If you didn’t see the first part here’s How to talk to your vet about tough subjects, part one of two)

I just read a book…
“I just read a really interesting book about _____________. I learned many fascinating things which I think will really help me/my cat. I bought you a copy which is yours to keep and make notes in. If we don’t have time today to discuss some of the key points I’d like to set up an appointment or phone time. Would you have your front desk contact me when you’ve had a chance to read the book?”

Requesting tests
“I’ve read that sometimes basic testing isn’t enough to get to the root cause of many illnesses or diseases. After doing a bit of research I learned that testing for _____________ can be beneficial and shed light. Would you please order this test for me/my cat.”

If the doctor balks at about ordering the tests, don’t give up.
“Would you explain to me is detail why you feel it’s not valuable to test for ________?” I found many references between _______ and _____ so I’d really like to pursue advance testing, this week.”

If the doctor says “We only test for conditions that we can fix.”
Yes, that was once said to your cat faerie. Her comeback was:
“Well, I enjoy hunting for treatments and resources, I love turning over rocks and seeing what’s under them. So let’s go ahead and run the test, see some numbers, and I can do some research. Even if I come up with nothing at least we tried. I am paying for the test after all.”

The doctor does not know about alternative therapies, or thinks they are weird or don’t work.
We saved the toughest for last. Doctors paid a premium for their training and it’s very dear to them. So anything that wasn’t in their curriculum is often mysterious, threatening, and viewed as weird, not effective, or maybe even dangerous. They could have had instructors who warned them that alternative treatments are bad.

“I know that __________ isn’t your thing, but I’ve read good things about it, and I have a friend who used ___________________ and it worked out really well. Would you consider:

  • Reading this book
  • Reading this website or forum
  • Reading this report
  • Calling this clinic/specialist (provide name and phone number, or email) for some advice
  • Transfer a copy of my/my cat’s file to a practitioner that I found so they can review the history. I’ll have you copied on results.

If you seek the advice of another doctor or specialist, keep your vet in the loop by forwarding test results, treatment and progress for the file. If you doctor or vet knows you’ve sought out other directions, but kept him/her informed they won’t feel slighted, and everyone will benefit. It’s very possible that your doctor/vet will be impressed and learn a new modality. We’ve seen this happen first hand! We let a very skeptical, eye rolling veterinarian sit in on a session with an animal chiropractor. He was so impressed that not only did he study veterinary chiropractic he went on to become an instructor!

We often get emails from people who say: “My vet is really great. I wish I could find an MD as wonderful of my vet!” Cat Faeries is always here to help your cat AND you. Your cat faerie recently stuck gold here when she found her new MD from this list. You can search by state for doctors who are hip to diet + health which is hard to find: http://lowcarbdoctors.blogspot.com

Coming soon! Food allergy testing for cats and dogs! It’s easy! It’s effective and affordable.

How to talk to your vet about tough subjects, part one of two

In the first part of this article we’ll talk about what to look for in a veterinarian, and your own personal MD. We need doctors who listen, who take notes, who do not condescend to you, who do not roll eyes or huff and puff, and who truly care.

In part two we’ll give you actual scripted dialogue to help you articulate your thoughts, ideas, and concerns, and to bring up possibly touchy subjects.

This is particularly helpful when you want the doctor to explore alternative or uncommon methods to treat your cats or yourself, particularly if it’s something you discovered online. Doctors often cringe when we say “I read about blah-blah-blah online.”

We’ll help you approach your doctors with intelligence and a firm hand, while remaining respectful. It’s a tricky juggling act, but it can be done with great results for everyone including a doctor who could learn a new trick, from you!

Check List So You Can Evaluate Any Vet or Doctor:

  • Is this person a really good listener, who makes eye contact with you, seems present, not bored or annoyed? Let’s you speak and say what you want to say without interruption. Does this person save questions for when you are finished?
  • Ask the doctor if they stay current on professional bulletins, newsletters. Does the doctor go to conferences? If so, which ones, and how often?
  • Ask the doctor what advanced training they have taken, or what interesting fields they have studied beyond their university training. Ask if the doctor has considered modalities that are not taught in colleges.
  • Does the doctor confer with colleagues via Skype or email for tough cases?
  • Does this doctor seem rushed for time and make you feel there isn’t ample time for you to speak? Have your concerns been addressed and questions answered?
  • Did the doctor take notes, either handwritten in your file or typed into the computer?
  • Is their equipment state-of-the-art and replaced every few years? (This is important, we know of a vet clinic which used a very old X-ray machine that had belonged to a podiatrist who retired.)
  • Will they let you see “behind the scenes” for a glimpse at treatment, surgery and kennel areas. Be on the lookout for icky smells and cleanliness. Are these areas tidy and quiet?
  • Does this doctor volunteer time helping those in need? We know one veterinarian who plans vacations around going to exotic places performing surgeries on orangutans and big cats.
  • You may not be a stand-up comic, but if you said something funny or light hearted did this person show some degree of a sense of humor?
  • Are the nurses and front desk staff friendly, intelligent sounding, compassionate. Do they also listen to you without giving you’re The Bum’s Rush?
  • Does this doctor have a cell phone or email for after hours emergencies? That’s not mandatory, and of course the doctor needs personal down-time, but it sure is nice to be able to reach someone.

Part Two will be actual dialogue or a script that you can use when bringing up something touchy or something which might make the doctor feel challenged or threatened. In particular if you want to discuss alternative treatments and therapies, ideas which might be new to the doctor. Or worse, that the doctor thinks is weird. Diplomacy works wonders and it’s helpful to have a guide so you can find the words when you might feel intimidated.

We often get emails from people who say: “My vet is really great. I wish I could find an MD as wonderful of my vet!” Cat Faeries is always here to help your cat AND you. Your cat faerie recently stuck gold here when she found her new MD from this list. You can search by state for doctors who are hip to diet + health which is hard to find: http://lowcarbdoctors.blogspot.com