Cat Safe & Cat Poisonous Spring Flowers

How many of you cat lovers were given lilies this past weekend? Who among us gave someone with cats lilies or are about to?
Go this article with a short one minute video about the dangers of lilies for cats then throw them into the compost bin!

Paws on Safety: 1 Min Pet Clinic – Lily Toxicity

Mother’s Day and Father’s Day are both coming up and that means gifts of pretty spring time flowers – but many of them are poisonous to cats and shouldn’t be anywhere inside the home of a cat. Among them are tulips, daffodils, and crocus. Did you know that baby’s breath is toxic to cats? We think you’ll enjoy this short article.

http://www.petpoisonhelpline.com/pet-owners/seasons/spring/

While we don’t endorse Teleflora (personally, we like to shop locally and put together our own flower arrangements) they do have a very good page on their website with safe Spring time flowers and pretty photos of bouquet ideas.

http://www.teleflora.com/nontoxic-pet-friendly-flowers-plants.asp


Pretty kittens with pretty cat-safe lilacs

At our house about the only flowers you’ll ever see are fair trade roses. You cannot go wrong with a nice bunch of roses! Or Lilacs! We adore lilacs during their all too short season. Other cat-safe flowers include: African violets, Alyssium, Calendula, Bachelor’s Buttons, Begonias, Columbine, Coneflowers, Gerber Daisies, Hollyhocks, Impatiens, Nasturtium, Orchids, Petunias, Snapdragons, Sunflowers, Violets, Zinnias.

If you are like me and love flowering herbs these make very sweet little rustic bouquets, darling in Mason jars: Basil, Bee Balm, Cilantro or Coriander, Chamomile, Lavender, Lemon Balm, Lovage, All of the Mints, Oregan, Rosemary, Sage, Tarragon, Thyme.

Is buying “pet insurance” worth the cost?

Nearly every vet’s office has an application at the front desk for some sort of “pet insurance” health policy. We’ve noticed there are quite a few different companies which offer animal health insurance which has us wondering which might be the best one to buy. A better question, is it even worth it? After all, this is a monthly fee for a service that you may never need, or may never use up what you put into it.

We found this objective article. The author makes a very good point that it’s a good idea to create a savings account to put aside money for the feline health version of “for a rainy day.”

http://www.nbcnews.com/id/43916934/ns/business-consumer_news/t/pet-insurance-good-deal-or-rip/

Next we also asked our good friend, Newton who’s one smart feline cookie to give us his purrspective, which we know is always a good one. He did some digging and not in the cat box! Interestingly, Newton tells us that: “I couldn’t find anyone recommending it (except the insurance companies). I tried to find out some background on the industry worldwide – not much out there.”


Newton’s Purrspective – Should you buy “pet insurance” for your cat’s possible health concerns?



Isaac Newton

We all know that keeping your cat healthy requires a certain level of financial commitment. However, most family budgets don’t include the costs for non-routine surgery, hospitalization for life threatening disease, or treatment by a specialist. Is health insurance for Kitty the answer?

Insurance is all about risk management. What are the chances your cat will need expensive veterinary care? Accidents can happen at any age. Senior cats are more likely to develop conditions such as diabetes (treated with insulin) or chronic kidney failure (requiring fluids either at home or during hospitalization). There is no way to predict what might happen or exactly what it will cost.

What is best for you may be a combination of these ways to plan ahead:

1. pet insurance
2. savings or credit options
3. regular veterinary care to detect problems early
4. a cat safe environment

Is pet insurance worth the cost?

http://www.nbcnews.com/id/43916934/ns/business-consumer_news/t/pet-insurance-good-deal-or-rip/

Those monthly payments may not seem so bad if Kitty does require expensive surgery. But everybody hopes they will never need the insurance and are often paying for peace of mind.

http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/magazine-archive/2011/august/money/pet-costs/pet-insurance-rarely-worth-the-price-in-our-analysis/index.htm

If you decide to buy pet insurance do the research to find a plan that is right for you. Questions to ask include:

1. What are the deductibles?
2. Are there treatment exclusions?

3. Is there a lifetime cap on benefits?

http://cats.about.com/od/pethealthinsurance/bb/bybpetinsurance.htm

Another option is to have savings set aside for emergencies (i.e. pay yourself the insurance premium). There is also a health care credit card called Care Credit. http://www.carecredit.com/ The online application can be done at home or right in your veterinarian’s office (online or by phone). You choose the amount you need (e.g. estimated cost of procedure) and you get the decision instantly.

Potential costs can be minimized with regular exams for early disease detection. Also make your home as cat safe as possible. Eliminate poisonous plants (http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/animal-poison-control/toxic-and-non-toxic-plants/c?field_toxicity_value[0]=02&&page=2) and dangerous toys (e.g. anything easily broken or small enough to swallow). I love my Legendary Cat Toys (http://www.catfaeries.com/toys.html) because they are large and can take a lot of rough play.

One final caution: Like most cats I can’t resist chasing yarn. It’s lots of fun until I catch it and it gets stuck to the little barbs on my tongue! Should this happen, my staff is always there to make sure I don’t swallow it. Thread is even more dangerous since it is often attached to a sewing needle. Yikes! http://www.catster.com/lifestyle/ask-a-vet-cat-swallows-needle-what-to-do

A cat safe environment is insurance everyone can afford.


On Newton’s advice to keep your cat’s home environment safe: Cat Faeries chimes in with a few favorites of our own. We’re pretty obsessively green around here as you probably have noticed from our articles!

  • Keep your home free of scented/fragranced products – artificial fragrances are carcinogenic, cause respiratory distress, and brain damage in some cases. Also, scent, whether or not it smell good is very subjective – not everyone likes the same smells. People who have chemical intolerance only smell the chemicals which aren’t pretty.
  • Hardwood floors or natural linoleum rather than carpet or laminate. 60 Minutes recently did an expose’ about toxic laminate from China:
    http://wtvr.com/2015/03/02/report-high-formaldehyde-levels-found-in-va-flooring-from-lumber-liquidators/
  • The microwave makes a good cabinet to store things! Don’t nuke your food or your cat’s food.
  • Glass bowls for the cat’s food and water – never plastic. Wash them with a simple soap and water, daily.
  • Filter the water that you drink and that you serve to your cat. Filter your cooking and coffee water too.
  • Take your filtered water to a higher level when you Vitalize the drinking water for everyone in your home with our VitaJuwel gemstone vial/wands!
  • Don’t buy furniture make from particle board. The glues and adhesives off gas and are carcinogenic. It horrifies us to see that particle board is used to build new homes, schools, and cat condos.

Why Sprouts Are Good for Cats: Make healthful Kitty Spaghetti from red clover seeds

We’ve always been fans of wheat grass for cats, having written what could have been the first article ever on the benefits of wheat grass for cats in Tiger Tribe magazine back in 1993.

Yaelle is a Cat Faeries customer and for over 20 years she’s made what she calls Kitty Spaghetti or Cat Salad from sprouted red clover seeds. She has tended to countless cats from her own, as well as ferals and fosters. A true cat whisperer! Here’s what she has to say about red clover sprouts.


Yaelle’s Healthy “Cat Salad” or “Kitty Spaghetti”

This is my simple “cat salad/kitty spaghetti” recipe that I feed my cats, to all my rescues/fosters, too. In over 20 years only 3 cats have refused this delicious and nutritious dish. Kitties gobble this up faster than I’ve seen cats eat any other kind of food.

What you need:

  • red clover seeds
  • A clean 1 quart Mason jar
  • Something mesh like: panty hose, cheese cloth.
  • A rubber band
  • Filtered water
  • Alternatively you could be a special sprouting jar at your local health food store, but truly a Mason jar is just as good and it’s practically free!

HERE’S A BASIC HOW-TO-SPROUT RECIPE:
1: Take red clover seeds and put them in your clean quart-sized jar. For one or two cats: 1 to 2 tablespoons. For more cats and yourself add 4 to 6 tablespoons of seeds.

2: Add purified or filtered water enough that the water is several inches above the seeds. The seeds will expand, so make sure you have enough water covering them.

3: Soak overnight.

4: In the morning pour off water. Then add more water through the pantyhose or cheesecloth and rinse the seeds well. Do this a couple of times. Once you’ve done your final rinse place mouth of jar down at 45 degree angle for drainage and ventilation. There are several ways you can tilt the jars at a 45 degree angle. You can use a dish drainer or prop the jar up at the correct angle with dish towels and something to lean the jar against.

5: Rinse twice a day with fresh cool water.

6: After 4 or 5 days you’ve got mature sprouts. Don’t let them go longer, they’ll get bigger and tough. It’s now time to start using them. Your sprouts are fresh for almost one week stored in a glass jar in the fridge.

Once you get the hang of this you can keep a jar or two in rotation so that you don’t run out of sprouts. It’s a bit tricky at first to get the rhythm down, and for a long time I found that either I had too many sprouts or I was running out. Eventually with practice, you develop a system that works optimally for you, your cats and your schedule. This delicate sprouting process doesn’t have to be a perfect science. Even if the sprouts are not fully grown, as long as they have sprouted, they are a “living food” and what’s essential for this healthful recipe!

I have 3 quart-sized glass jars “going” at all times:

  • One jar has seeds that are soaking. I soak my seeds about every 3 or 4 days.
  • The 2nd jar has sprouts that are in the growing stage.
  • The 3rd jar has the sprouts that are ready to harvest.

Time to add sprouts to your cat’s food!

After your sprouts are ready, you take your preferred moist cat food. I recommend Primal Freeze-Dried Formula for Cats It comes in little “bricks” or nuggets. It’s frozen 100% human-grade raw organic food full of wonderful things such as coconut oil. It’s a bit expensive but worth it if you can afford it.

Here’s where to find this cat food: http://www.primalpetfoods.com/locator/index.php

(Cat Faeries recommends the turkey flavor as we do not trust fish from any source at this time. This is what we feed our own cats, and only the turkey flavor.)

Put the cat’s food in a bowl and add sprouts, mixing with a fork. You might give the sprouts a rough chop first.

In addition you could add a little cod liver oil for skin and fur. It has lots of vitamin A and D and tastes fishy so cats really go for it! Kitties (and humans) really need their healthy fats.

Finally, to “spice” things up, I always sprinkle some spirulina into my cat salad/kitty spaghetti.

I only have known 3 cats who would not eat the “cat salad/kitty spaghetti” from the very first serving. For those cats you could add a few of your kitty’s favorite and healthful kibble just like “meatballs” on top of spaghetti or salad “croutons”!

BON APPETIT

With all my love,
Yaelle


Here’s a picture of Yaelle’s Cassie…

Scientists Prove Sitting in Boxes Calms Cats

Cats and boxes. Has your cat ever met a box it didn’t like (other than a teeny tiny box that a fabulous piece of jewelry came in)? Cats love boxes. Even boxes that appear to be too small for them, somehow your cat will squeeze into it and be blissful.

We found an article on Wired.com about fascinating scientists who have researched why cats love boxes so much, and from one in particular you’ll learn why boxes are a good thing. Claudia Vinke, a Dutch Ethologist* worked with cats in a Dutch shelter. She provided boxes for a newly arrived group of cats while not giving boxes to another group. She found a significant difference in stress levels between cats that had the boxes and those that didn’t. The cats with boxes got used to their new surroundings faster, were far less stressed early on, and were more interested in interacting with humans.

The article on Wired.com has more fascinating scientifically proven reasons for why cats love boxes – and actually need boxes. This has us thinking about our recent article about cats, stress, over grooming and the benefits of wearing a jacket or sweater for purposes of calming. We at Cat Faeries wonder: would cats who are self-barbering or over grooming not just benefit from a sweater, but also from having several boxes in the home to hang out in? It’s certainly an experiment that’s virtually free of cost, doesn’t take up a lot of space, and your cat could love it and be happier. What do you think?

Here’s the article about cats and boxes at Wired: http://www.wired.com/2015/02/whats-up-with-cats-and-boxes/

Here’s a link to our our story about cats and sweaters written by Cat Faeries’ friend, Newton, a cat who knows everything – http://www.catfaeries.com/blog/newtons-purr-spective-when-grooming-gets-out-of-control/

* Ethology is the scientific and objective study of animal behavior, usually with a focus on behavior under natural conditions. Behaviorism is a term that also describes the scientific and objective study of animal behavior, but it usually refers to the study of trained behavioral responses in a laboratory context.

Do you know who makes your cat’s toys?

If you are a Cat Faeries customer and newsletter reader you know that we are completely against cat toys and cat beds, as well as clothing and other goods, which are made outside of the US by exploited workers.

This short article about three fashion loving Norwegians who travel to Cambodia to live and work as sewing factory workers. Their naïve eyes were opened to just how bad it is. Whether jeans or cat toys: a sweatshop is a sweatshop – a deplorable place.

Here’s the article – A DOSE OF REALITY AT A SWEATSHOP: NORWEGIAN FASHION LOVERS GET AN EYE-OPENING EXPERIENCE – at EcoSalon.com.

There’s also a web series documenting their experiences – SWEATSHOP – DEADLY FASHION.

The article you’ll read only talks about the conditions that factory workers work and live in, it doesn’t touch upon other reasons why we should avoid “fast fashion” and soft goods from Asia – the fabrics are treated with toxic chemicals, once the items are loaded onto the ship the containers are fumigated, and then there’s the staggering amount of fossil fuel it takes to get those cheap clothes, cat toys and cat beds to the US. Articles like this one are about “the high cost of cheap clothes.” We are paying dearly with our health, and our good consciousness isn’t being served. The price and toll to health and environment of cheap goods made in Asia far outweigh the few pennies that you think you saved.

Cat Faeries catnip cat toys, and cat beds are American made – they always have been, and they always will be. Each toy is lovingly hand made by a talented artist. Chinese made cat toys are NOT OK OR SAFE in our view. The catnip in our toys doesn’t compare with the catnip in other toys which come from questionable sources – our catnip is beyond organic, it’s ethically wildcrafted. Our cat beds are made in a small factory in California where the workers are paid a living wage and get bonuses. The water proof pads that we offer are made in Canada – not China where all of the similar pads that we found are made. Cat Faeries cares about quality, safety, the health and wellbeing of your you and your cats, and for all of the people involved with making our products or components for our products.

Feline longevity, a long life for your cat.

Everyone wants to live a long and happy life, and your cat is no exception. Cat Faeries is devoted to making the lives of cats healthful, while providing solutions for good behavior. Here are our picks for feline life extension!

Kidney Kitty Flower Essence Formula For Cats
Starting when your cat is young, or really starting at any age because it’s never too late: a few drops in the water bowl every day supports kidney function. We’ve heard from many customers who said that when they ran out they saw a negative difference in their cat. Once they started again the cat rallied!

Here’s a recent quote from a customer…

Pita is almost 15 now. A few weeks ago he was displaying signs of kidney problems – lethargic, lack of appetite, his coat was getting nappy. I upped his daily dose of Kidney Kitty, and I was amazed – he bounced back to his normal self within 3 days!!! Thank you Cat Faeries!

Pam – January, 2015

Elder Support Flower Essence Formula For Cats
At the first sign of age start with this one in the water bowl or mixed into food. Supports joints, the brain, and the thyroid.
Mood Music for Cats (and cat lovers): A Ball of Twine, a CD of calming music
We can’t emphasize enough how soothing sounds and serenity kick illnesses to the curb, extend life, lower blood pressure, lower blood sugar, and so much more. We love this CD. It’s not new agey, these are original compositions which remind us a bit of lullabies. It’s very pretty music. There’s a sound clip at the link – hold your cat while you play it and see the reaction!
Comfort Zone with Feliway – Diffuser Plug-Ins
Even if your cats are perfect with their litter boxes and don’t fight the calming scent of this pheromone will keep them calm. Calm cats = cats who’ll age very well and gracefully. Place one in any room where your cats spend most of their time. Each refill bottle lasts 4 weeks. This is a great investment in your cat’s health and future.

Toys! Toys! Toys! And more Toys!
A lot of human fitness experts have stopped using words like “work” out, rather they are calling exercise “play.” And play is something we like to do no matter our age, cats included. Running, leaping, chasing, stalking, pouncing keeps your cat young with limber joints and a trim body. Our toys are American made. The catnip inside is ethically wildcrafted with the highest level of nepetalactone of any catnip on the planet (yes, it’s been tested!). The unique shapes, fabrics, and sizes appeal to cats of all ages, and the adorableness appeals to people.

Sleep my pretties, sleep! (in a Faerie Cat Bed!)

Our cat beds are American made in a small factory in California by workers who are paid a living wage and are treated very well. And they are pretty! And soft. Our beds do not have that toxic foam on the sides. Who wants toxins! Besides, those beds can’t be washed, and your cat can’t bend or position the sides to be comfy and cozy. Our beds wash beautifully and they are attractive to your cat and will look great in your home.

And, Green Cat Beds Are On Sale!